The Common Core of State Mind Control over Children


Michael Stuart Kelly

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"Shoot" might also soon apply to citizens shooting down law enforcement such as that off duty cop acting as security. That's when the shit really hits the fan. If they are going to use cops that way they should be in uniform just for starters and they should not act under instructions from a school board but only enforce the law. What law was he enforcing? It can't be trespass. If a school board wants to take questions non-verbally then they should be mailed in and considered in a closed session. Some years ago I saw an off-duty cop in civies tackle a shop-lifter in a store's parking lot. He was the store's security though I don't know what his employment status was respecting his primary job. That was a legitimate police action. Police are like dogs in that they both do what they are told and do what they can. If you are compliant they can't do much, especially in a public way. If you aren't, they will make you compliant as long as they think they can get away with it. In private they can be extremely dangerous, especially if they are ego-weak and/or pressured by a corrupt peer group that demands that corruption.

--Brant

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My son's school has an open meeting tonight regarding Common Core. Unfortunately, I'm away on business and am going to miss it. Now I'm thinking maybe it's a good thing.

Yep...the thought police are out in full force now and they are not going to go away.

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Here's Glenn talking about Bill Gates and Common Core. He doesn't mention the term "crony capitalism," but that's the ostensive power at the root of this brainwashing method.

The hidden power is a philosophy and attitude that some people are superior than others and should be in control of how these other people live their lives.

Did Bill Gates admit the real purpose of Common Core?

It's a video, but I couldn't find an easy way to embed it here.

This is pure dictatorship by committee of technocrats.

Michael

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  • 2 weeks later...

St. Tammany School Board committee adopts resolution seeking end of Common Core in LA

My child doesn't attend public school, but I still found it encouraging. It doesn't change anything, but it is at least a public statement.

In related news, I missed my son's school's open meeting regarding Common Core implementation so I've requested a personal audience with administrators. The vice principal so far seems to be avoiding me. :mellow:

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Children are so emotionally generous. I know so many great people with pretty bad parents, really bad human beings, and their children truly love them. The big bonus for parents is, absent real neglect or abuse, your kids are going to love you. And even like you!

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I did get some complaints about reading "girl's stories" . Haha, said I, Mark Twain did not think so. If Anne was good enough for him she is good enough for you.

http://www.openculture.com/2013/10/mark-twains-advice-to-little-girls-witty-counsel-to-young-ladies-of-1865.html

Mark-Twain.jpg

Others go as far as to become enthusiasts of all things Twain, but perhaps stop just short of reading his “Advice to Little Girls,” a brief piece that offers the following points of counsel to the young ladies of 1865:

  • Good little girls ought not to make mouths at their teachers for every trifling offense. This retaliation should only be resorted to under peculiarly aggravated circumstances.
  • If you have nothing but a rag-doll stuffed with sawdust, while one of your more fortunate little playmates has a costly China one, you should treat her with a show of kindness nevertheless. And you ought not to attempt to make a forcible swap with her unless your conscience would justify you in it, and you know you are able to do it.
  • You ought never to take your little brother’s “chewing-gum” away from him by main force; it is better to rope him in with the promise of the first two dollars and a half you find floating down the river on a grindstone. In the artless simplicity natural to this time of life, he will regard it as a perfectly fair transaction. In all ages of the world this eminently plausible fiction has lured the obtuse infant to financial ruin and disaster.
  • If at any time you find it necessary to correct your brother, do not correct him with mud—never, on any account, throw mud at him, because it will spoil his clothes. It is better to scald him a little, for then you obtain desirable results. You secure his immediate attention to the lessons you are inculcating, and at the same time your hot water will have a tendency to move impurities from his person, and possibly the skin, in spots.
  • If your mother tells you to do a thing, it is wrong to reply that you won’t. It is better and more becoming to intimate that you will do as she bids you, and then afterward act quietly in the matter according to the dictates of your best judgment.
  • You should ever bear in mind that it is to your kind parents that you are indebted for your food, and for the privilege of staying home from school when you let on that you are sick. Therefore you ought to respect their little prejudices, and humor their little whims, and put up with their little foibles until they get to crowding you too much.
  • Good little girls always show marked deference for the aged. You ought never to “sass” old people unless they “sass” you first.
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What is it?

It's an education program called Common Core State Standards Initiative.

I am not all that familiar with it, so I won't comment on details yet. I learned of it from yesterday's Glenn Beck Program--he is making a major campaign against it. Here is the article on TheBlaze ...

Glenn Beck mentioned that Michelle Malkin has a lot of information on the Common Core State Standards Initiative. I looked it up on her site. She has an entire "Rotten to the Core" series. I have not had time to read it, but given my leaning in Glenn and Michelle's direction and my trust in their credibility to get the information right (but not always agreeing with their conclusions), here are the links.

Paraphrasing his conceptual communalism, he stated that ...

... As one author noted, Dewey explained that ...

For the record, I have not seen Mitra mentioned in any of the Common Core materials I have examined yet, but ...

... I'm only providing this video because I came across it and it fits so well.

The following isn't Common Core, but it show just how far the infiltration of indoctrination goes

Here's Glenn talking about Bill Gates and Common Core. He doesn't mention the term "crony capitalism," but that's the ostensive power at the root of this brainwashing method.

The hidden power is a philosophy and attitude that ...

The Common Core State Standards Initiative website is located here.

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The astounded me having been involved in aspects of curriculum development in my nine (9) years on the school board...

So when I discovered this Common Core lesson on Early World Civilizations and began to read up on the things being taught in the unit, imagine my surprise when I discovered this lesson was for 1st grade. Yes, you read that right, FIRST grade. Six year olds will be asked to do the following:

Those are only three of the eighty one (81!) things that your 6 year old should know at the end of this “ELA Domain.” And none of them have anything to do with the actual mechanics of reading and writing.

Explain the significance of the Code of Hammurabi;

Explain the significance of gods/goddesses, ziggurats, temples, and priests in Mesopotamia;

Describe key components of a civilization.

This particular lesson was taken from EngageNY, an organization created by the New York State Education Department to provide Common Core-aligned educational resources among other things.

- See more at: http://politichicks.tv/column/common-core-developmentally-inappropriate/#sthash.zx9SsA3j.dpuf

So, I followed the links.

First of all, this is from a website of great intentions created June 11, 2013. This is not a curriculum.

Second, if it were in McGuffey's Reader, you would be touting it and wringing your hands that the Progressives have dumbed us down.

Third, it is only part of a long list of 81 goals that includes:

Locate the area known as Mesopotamia on a world map or globe and identify it as part of Asia;
Identify cuneiform as the system of writing used in Mesopotamia;
Explain why a written language is important to the development of a civilization;
Describe key components of a civilization;
Identify hieroglyphics as the system of writing used in ancient Egypt;
Identify pyramids and explain their significance in ancient Egypt;
Explain that much of Egypt is in the Sahara Desert;
Locate Jerusalem, Israel, and the area known as the Middle East on a map;
Define monotheism as the belief in one God;
Identify that a Jewish house of worship is called a synagogue or temple;
Identify important Jewish holidays such as Passover, Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, and Hanukkah;
Explain that followers of Christianity are called Christians;
Identify that a Christian house of worship is called a church;
Explain that Islam originated in Arabia;
Explain that followers of Islam are called Muslims;
Listen to and demonstrate understanding of nonfiction/informational read-alouds of appropriate complexity for grades 1–3;
With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed;
Carry on and participate in a conversation over at least six turns, staying on topic, initiating comments or responding to a partner’s comments, with either an adult or another child of the same age;
Ask questions to clarify information about the topic in a fiction or nonfiction/informational read-aloud;
Ask and answer questions (e.g., who, what, where, when), orally or in writing, requiring literal recall and understanding of the details and/or facts of a fiction or nonfiction/informational read-aloud;
Ask questions to clarify directions, exercises, classroom routines, and/or what a speaker says about a topic;
Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly;
Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation;
Use personal pronouns orally

My guess is that personal pronouns will be the take-away here...

It is not true that infantile children are being coerced into college-level concepts. It is true that children can, indeed, understand such concepts when they are presented appropriately. It is also true that these 81 points cannot all be addressed in a single 35-week school year. The teacher will just have to do the best she can...

In the mean time, political conservatives can relax: your children (at age 6) will not know more than you do ...

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In the mean time, political conservatives can relax: your children (at age 6) will not know more than you do ...

Really?

Know more "information?"

Or, know more how to critically evaluate a set of inputs and reason through to a conclusion that works with reality?

Sometimes, Mike, you make assertions that, at best, are difficult to rationally follow.

A...
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Selene, of the 81 points, I purposely selected the concretes. In fact, among the others are:

Explain why a written language is important to the development of a civilization;
Explain the significance of the Code of Hammurabi;
Explain why rules and laws are important to the development of a civilization;
Explain the ways in which a leader is important to the development of a civilization;
Explain the significance of gods/goddesses, ziggurats, temples, and priests in Mesopotamia;
Describe how a civilization evolves and changes over time;
Explain the importance of the Nile River and how its floods were important for farming;
Explain the significance of gods/goddesses in ancient Egypt;
Use narrative language to describe (orally or in writing) characters, setting, things, events, actions, a scene, or facts from a fiction read-aloud;
Identify who is telling the story at various points in a fiction read-aloud;
Ask and answer questions (e.g., who, what, where, when), orally or in writing, requiring literal recall and understanding of the details and/or facts of a nonfiction/informational read-aloud;
Answer questions that require making interpretations, judgments, or giving opinions about what is heard in a nonfiction/informational read-aloud, including answering why questions that require recognizing cause/effect relationships;
Identify the main topic and retell key details of a nonfiction/informational read-aloud;
Describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a nonfiction/informational read-aloud;
Ask and answer questions about unknown words and phrases in nonfiction/informational read-alouds and discussions;
Also in the list above that Selene passed off as mere "information" rather than critical thinking were:
With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed;
Carry on and participate in a conversation over at least six turns, staying on topic, initiating comments or responding to a partner’s comments, with either an adult or another child of the same age;
Ask questions to clarify information about the topic in a fiction or nonfiction/informational read-aloud;
Ask and answer questions (e.g., who, what, where, when), orally or in writing, requiring literal recall and understanding of the details and/or facts of a fiction or nonfiction/informational read-aloud;
Ask questions to clarify directions, exercises, classroom routines, and/or what a speaker says about a topic;
Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly;
Clearly, Common Core is an ambitious undertaking. If launched by a conservative home school support coalition, it would be praised to high heaven.
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I followed the link to PolitiChicks ("voice of conservative women") that Selene cited in the early posts. The writer was proudly ignorant.

I remember learning about the Etruscans when I was in the 9th grade. To this day I couldn’t tell you what they did or who they were because it was so boring I could barely keep from nodding off while writing the report and pray I didn’t get the uncontrollable giggles when I gave my presentation.So when I discovered this Common Core lesson on Early World Civilizations and began to read up on the things being taught in the unit, imagine my surprise when I discovered this lesson was for 1st grade. Yes, you read that right, FIRST grade....

This discussion inspired me to create a blog post about Common Core. I opened with this:

If “Common Core” had been discovered in the yellowed pages of a 19th century Presbyterian teachers’ college from Ohio, political conservatives would be insisting that it be instantiated immediately. Moreover, they would claim that any resistance to it is evidence of postmodernist Muslim Marxism. As it is, political conservatives across the spectrum, including libertarians and Objectivists, are completely and irrevocably opposed to something they know nothing about. If they understood it, they would be in favor of it.
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So, you disapprove of a national curriculum, regardless of its content, because it is imposed by the federal government?

It's all of a piece. It must be imposed and can't be national unless it's by the Federal government.

--Brant

"Teacher! Leave those kids alone!"

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Clearly, Common Core is an ambitious undertaking. If launched by a conservative home school support coalition, it would be praised to high heaven.

It always fascinates me when you cram "conservative" and "home school" into a philosophical mixmaster and claim some kind of undestnding about how the state should impose a curriculum on free citizens.

No thanks.

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Common Core is NOT a Federal initiative. It was created by the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers. That is why 45 states (Republican and Democrat), four territories, and the US DoD have adopted these standards.

Texas chose not to. It was their privilege. However, note that Texas does have a unified state school system. (Lee Harvey Oswald did not shoot President Kennedy from the roof of the Dallas Book Depository because that one building was where all the Dallas area school books were kept. The State of Texas buys all the books for all the public schools, so everyone gets the same education. Thus, the top 10% of all kids at all school have guaranteed admission to the University of Texas,)

Also not in are Minnesota, Nebraska, Virginia, and Alaska. Again, it was their choice. This is not a Federal mandate.

Common Core is a "drop back and punt" conservative strategy in response to the years and years of conservatives wringing their hands because kids in the USA score lower than their peers in Estonia, Singapore, and 17 other industrialized nations. Those nations all have integrated (national) educational systems. In most of them, private schools exist only by permission and must follow government curricula. Last year, on my blog, I wrote:

The greatest strength in the American system of education is that there is no system. The pluralism of our society allows choices, options, and alternatives at every level. The USA has more than 14,000 school districts (for primary and secondary education) and over 5,700 institutions of higher education (two-year and four-year colleges and universities). These all serve 81 million client learners. About 10% (5 million plus) attend private schools K-12. Also, about 2 million are home schooled. Peculiar to the USA, annually, about 65,000 unauthorized immigrants graduate from high school.

American Education: At Least Two Cheers

Moreover, as everyone knows, with some exceptions such as Singapore, in those other nations, not everyone goes to the same high schools and not everyone can go to college. In those other nations, your future is decided by the secondary school you enter. In Japan (at least through the 90s when I was active in the culture), the university you entered determined the corporation you would work for. In addition, those other nations are not multi-cultural continent-sized federations. Singapore is an exception, but if you look at Hong Kong, Estonia, Finland, The Czech Republic, the Slovak Republic, ... you find a lot of little monochromatic places. So, for them, nationalized, unified systems might make sense.

Common Core is an attempt to regain the high quality basic education that everyone seems to think we once had when American led the world. That mythical world of "Leave it to Beaver" or the previous "Greatest Generation" was very much like our own: troubled about the lack of education. Thus, America copied the German "gynmasium" and British "publc school" (i.e. private school), with our own High School movement of the early 1900s. It was needed to keep feeding students into the new land grant colleges such as Michigan State, Texas A&M, etc., etc. because an eighth grade education was no longer enough. Americans either studied on their own with tutors or went to a finishing school or prep school. To solve the "crisis" we launched secondary schools or "high" schools. It seemed to work... for a while...

Myself, I think that the lack of a system worked best. But Common Core is not a creation of Comrade Mullah Barack Obama (who only exists when he is perceived).

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