Michael Stuart Kelly

The Story Wars of Hot Political Issues

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The art of persuasion?  This video was shown to the media scrum before President Trump took questions, apparently.  The White House logo is ... prominent. Who is "Destiny Pictures"?

[Added:  MSK has already posted the video, embedded in a Tweet, which I missed. Sometimes my turbo browser (Slimjet) fails to load tweet-embeds properly.

-- I am left wondering if the Korean-language version of the trailer will be available to North Korean news consumers. ]

 

Edited by william.scherk
Added link-back to MSK's original posting of the Destiny Pictures trailer ...

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43 minutes ago, william.scherk said:

Who is "Destiny Pictures"?

William,

I imagine this: Destiny Pictures.

The Founder is this guy: Mark Castaldo.

From his mini-bio on IMDb:

Quote

Born and raised in New York, Mr. Castaldo began a professional career in the casino business working 10 years in Atlantic City and Las Vegas as a croupier. Mr. Castaldo then relocated to Los Angeles where he resides to pursue his passion of telling stories.

Mr. Castaldo is a multi- award winning independent producer well versed in all areas; development, talent, pre-pro, production, post, festivals and sales/distribution with his company Destiny Pictures.

I wonder who could have been in the casino business in Atlantic City at the time Mr. Castaldo was a croupier, I wonder, I wonder? :)

Since this is about persuasion and story wars, let's hear from Scott Adams on the filme:

And a comment from him about those who don't grok what's going on:

And what do I think of the anti-Trumpers sourpussing even this? They'll get there someday. I'm rootin' for 'em. But I have to admit, their constant negativity on anything and everything Trump sure makes for some fun mockery.

:)

Michael

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1 hour ago, Michael Stuart Kelly said:

William,

I imagine this: Destiny Pictures.

The Founder is this guy: Mark Castaldo.

From his mini-bio on IMDb:

I wonder who could have been in the casino business in Atlantic City at the time Mr. Castaldo was a croupier, I wonder, I wonder? :)

Since this is about persuasion and story wars, let's hear from Scott Adams on the filme:

And a comment from him about those who don't grok what's going on:

And what do I think of the anti-Trumpers sourpussing even this? They'll get there someday. I'm rootin' for 'em. But I have to admit, their constant negativity on anything and everything Trump sure makes for some fun mockery.

:)

Michael

It's a hoot watching people who are all style and zero substance criticizing this masterful use of aesthetics.

J

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23 hours ago, william.scherk said:

The art of persuasion?

The enemies of America took the intriguing video and used it to make fun of Big Daddy's dealmaking.  

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15 minutes ago, william.scherk said:

The enemies of America took the intriguing video and used it to make fun of Big Daddy's dealmaking.  

Attempted humor, in order to succeed, needs to be truthful. The above isn't. It isn't making fun of Trump, but of the really bad straw man caricature narrative that the left has tried, and failed, to construct of Trump. 

It is kind of cool to be learning just how much the left has forgotten how to appeal to people, and is now making fun of hope and inspiration. They've forgotten how Billy Clinton and Barry Obama got elected. They seem to think that their anger and cynicism, and their being vocally opposed to the pretend straw man Trump that they've invented is going to get them somewhere? Cool. Keep it up!

J

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3 hours ago, Jonathan said:

Attempted humor, in order to succeed, needs to be truthful.

Jonathan,

And it needs to be funny. When you make a joke, then follow it with other jokes, you have to mix in new forms or, at least, let the forms you are using grow and morph. Otherwise, you get when psychologists call habituation.

The way the anti-Trumpers do repetition in humor is, basically, to tell the same joke over and over and over. Loot at that video. The joke is that Trump is trying to dazzle a bloody dictator with cheesy stock video to disarm his nukes. (All right, all right... the joke in the video is actually much lamer. All they're really joking about is mocking President Trump's intelligence and taste. But I'm trying to give them a helping hand here and throw in a little contrast, you know, to do them a solid, poor things. :) )

It goes like this: Here's an example of an image of stock video doing something unrelated to nukes. Yuk yuk yuk. Here's another example. See? Stock video. Yuk yuk yuk. Here's another example. See? Stock video. Yuk yuk yuk. Here's another example. See? Stock video. Yuk yuk yuk. Here's another example. See? Stock video. Yuk yuk yuk. Here's another example. See? Stock video. Yuk yuk yuk. 

It's just not funny anymore after the first couple or three times. 

There's another point, too. The initial joke isn't all that funny in itself because the point of the mockery is self-congratulatory. It's not about It's all about the video maker "nailing it" and feeling superior. And that gets tiresome pretty fast. Here's an Australian article from last year that discusses this very point:

The left can’t meme
From the article:

Quote

Generally speaking to be considered funny one can’t take themselves too serious. They need the ability to laugh at themselves and see irony in situations. In the past it was the conservative right that struggled with this; today it’s the left that has a puritanical streak. It’s hard to get humour when you’ve built an entire identity and social structure around being offended by everything.

. . .

... the left’s main trick is to state a ‘“fact” unsupported by evidence or using shock-value “evidence” and then tell themselves how they ‘nailed it’. Then they all laugh.

Rand had this problem, which is why comedy in O-Land is scarce. Rand thought laughing at oneself to be a moral crime. Sometimes it is, but not all the time. Sometimes taking yourself less seriously is just a way to let off steam and refocus your mind. And maybe share some good vibe. (There's neuroscience to back this up.)

Look at leftwing late-night comedy, This, too, has become tiresome because it's the same joke over and over. You can even Google this and get article after article trying to figure out what's gone wrong.

The fact is, there's no surprise, anymore. There's no letting the audience stare perplexed for a second, then start howling in hilarity as they suddenly figure out the comic connection.

There's only bashing Trump and habituation.

The big joke of the night is to bash Trump with an incongruent image. Audience applauds with self-righteous whoops and laughs a little. Then bash Trump again with another incongruent image. Audience applauds with self-righteous whoops and laughs a little. Bash Trump again with another incongruent image. Audience applauds with self-righteous whoops and laughs a little. Bash Trump again with another incongruent image. Audience applauds with self-righteous whoops and laughs a little. Bash Trump again with another incongruent image. Audience applauds with self-righteous whoops and laughs a little. Bash Trump again with another incongruent image. Audience applauds with self-righteous whoops and laughs a little. Bash Trump again with another incongruent image. Audience applauds with self-righteous whoops and laughs a little.

And on and on and on. This format never changes.

What's going on here is not comedy. It's ritual and probably something to do with self-affirmation by Nouveau Puritanical insecure soy eaters.

See? I can do it, too. But I stop after one, even if that one wasn't up to my great wonderful genius talent.

:) 

Michael

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20 hours ago, Michael Stuart Kelly said:

It's ritual and probably something to do with self-affirmation by Nouveau Puritanical insecure soy eaters.

See? I can do it, too. But I stop after one, even if that one wasn't up to my great wonderful genius talent.

 

At least "Nouveau Puritanical insecure soy eaters" has some truth to it, where the Narrative™ that has been made up about Trump and his supporters has none.

J

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14 minutes ago, Jonathan said:

At least "Nouveau Puritanical insecure soy eaters" has some truth to it, where the Narrative™ that has been made up about Trump and his supporters has none.

J

Soy? There is a commercial on TV where a woman talks about the difficulty in making lunch for "her little vegan."

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On 6/13/2018 at 1:56 PM, Michael Stuart Kelly said:

The way the anti-Trumpers do repetition in humor is, basically, to tell the same joke over and over and over.

Then there is Never-Trumper Rick Wilson, whose grip on the English language may give delight (to those awful people who don't want a proto-Emperor in the White House).  

A sample from his latest, "Donald Trump, the Insecure Pledge in the Dictatorship Fraternity."

Quote

[...] Why is today’s statement so much more outrageous, so much more egregious than any of a host of other Trumpian excesses, deviations from American values, shit-talking lunacy, and post-truth verbal dysentery? Because this week, Trump’s love of authoritarians, dictatorships and his actions and words came together. Donald Trump first went to the G-7 to wreck the proceedings with a combination of insult-comic schtick, diplomatic demolition derby, Putin cheerleading, and giant-toddler petulance.

He followed that with the Singapore Shitshow. It was a monstrous reality TV event, as was intended. But it left our putative allies wondering at the new Axis of Assholes Trump has joined—the CRANK: China, Russia, America and North Korea. By the end, it didn’t feel like he was after denuclearization but management tips from the portly little thug Kim.

For the American president to normalize, excuse, and ally himself with the worst of the world's bad actors while insulting, degrading, and destroying our allies and alliances would be appalling in any circumstance. The fact that Trump acts like a bumbling, eager fraternity pledge, desperate to join Phi Sigma Dictator makes it all the worse.

Donald Trump’s authoritarian impulses have never exactly been a state secret. The entire Trump leadership oeuvre is a grotesque, bubbling slurry of reality TV star egomania and crap-tier nationalist nostrums that sound like Pat Buchanan and Lyndon LaRouche had a love child. Barely contained racial animus and a will to power is what resembles the real heroes of Trump's blisteringly awful mental and moral landscape.
 
[...]
 

Trump's style from the beginning was authoritarian-chic; bossy, needy, insufferable, and centered on the bright, hot star in the center of the stage. Trump was never a man running as a servant of the people; he was an avatar for their darkest, most vengeful, most petty grievances and imagined slights from a catalog of monsters from the Fox News scare closet. He wasn’t a leader; he was an avenger. He played an old tune from the authoritarian songbook: pose as the one man who will the avenge the Dolchstoßlegendecommitted against MAGAmerica by the perfidious Others, whether they be Mexicans, Chinese, Jews, Muslims, RINOs, the Establishment, or the literate.

In office, he adopted more than even the usual trappings of the Imperial Presidency, right down to the Royal Family serving in positions of influence. His staff engaged in behavior toward Trump that treated him not as a President, but as a king. It started before the White House, with his dictator-chic interior design sensibility striking every wrong chord, a trainwreck of Saddam and Liberace set loose with too much gold leaf, a glue gun, and a half-pound of cocaine. [...]

Rick Wilson is on Twitter.

Edited by william.scherk
Added paragraphs from Never-Trumper Wilson's article; if we are going to use inflated language, might as well go whole hog. It's slightly better than "blah blah blah" ... IMHO

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18 minutes ago, william.scherk said:

Then there is Never-Trumper Rick Wilson, whose grip on the English language...

... was used to tell the same joke over and over.

He cusses about Trump.

yawn...

It's just not funny. He telegraphs all the punchlines ("Trump bad").

Michael

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2 hours ago, Michael Stuart Kelly said:

... was used to tell the same joke over and over.

He cusses about Trump.

yawn...

It's just not funny. He telegraphs all the punchlines ("Trump bad").

Michael

Oddly enough, I looked at the news just now to see this:

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette fires editorial cartoonist Rob Rogers

Rogers is a an anti-Trump cartoonist. And, of course, the left is going apeship about his firing, howling freedom of the press, victim of right wing oppression, and so on.

But, to my point, I don't think Rogers was fired over the anti-Trump content of his cartoons. That might have been part of it because of the volume, but it's nowhere near the major part. A newspaper is a business and if its customers dislike something, it will have to accomodate them or take a hit in the marketplace.

When customers see a political cartoon, the least they expect to get is a chuckle. When humor is nowhere to be found, the bias is against their own, and all they see is ugliness and propaganda-like demonization, they think, "Ugh. What crap." After enough times, they stop buying the paper.

As an indication, amidst all the yelling and self-righteous posturing in the article about poor mistreated Rogers,, there's this (my bold):

Quote

In recent weeks, a number of his cartoons, including some on President Donald Trump, were killed by the paper’s editorial director, Keith Burris.

. . .

He said he did not “suppress” Mr. Rogers’ cartoons but that Mr. Rogers was unwilling to “collaborate” with him about his work and ideas.

“We never said he should do no more Trump cartoons or do pro-Trump cartoons,” said Mr. Burris. “For an in-house staff cartoonist, editing is part of it. Rob’s view was, ‘Take it or leave it.’”

. . .

... the two exchanged frequent emails about Mr. Rogers’ cartoons in which Mr. Burris said he was trying to address “the tone and frequency” of his drawings about Mr. Trump.

“I asked for broader topics and could they be funnier?” Mr. Burris said.

On some occasions, he spiked Mr. Rogers’ cartoons and ran others from different artists on the same topics “with a little more humor,” Mr. Burris said.

Notice that the cartoons killed were not only ones dealing with President Trump. But I looked at the cartoons and, as I expected, there is so much hatred for Trump in them, they actually are not funny.

But try to tell that to a zealot stewing in hatred. Try to tell him that bigoted-level propaganda mockery is not funny to the average person.

Here's a typical recent cartoon to show what I mean.

06.16.2018-14.47.png

Never mind that a large chunk of Pittsburgh Post-Gazette customers have painful memories of family members killed in action and who think President Trump represents precisely the values of Truth, Honor, and Rule of Law, this cartoon just isn't funny.

It's the equivalent of the cartoonist sticking his tongue out at Trump and calling him a "fuckface." Being in front of a gravestone just adds to the bad vibes. Actually, that level of humor is funny to kindergartners and, maybe, virulent Trump haters, but to everybody else, it makes them feel embarrassed for the cartoonist--much the same way they feel embarrassed for a comedian who tells a string of unfunny jokes at a club that nobody laughs at, but thinks he's hot shit because some girl in the corner giggles a little every third joke or so.

I don't expect this cartoonist to understand that, though. And he should because there are a couple of chuckle-worthy cartoons of his I saw--even against Trump. So he knows better. He just doesn't want to do better. Here's an example that is more humorous:

06.16.2018-14.44.png

What make the second funny and the first not? The direct incongruity in the first is the equivalent of a haranguing lecture and gross demonization during a memorial of loved ones. It implies those who agree with Trump also kill Truth, Honor, and Rule of Law.

In the second, the main problem is space for text on the book cover and the message glides in under that. Even as propaganda, the second is far more effective than the first.

So not only is the left starting to lose the comedy side of the story wars, they are now starting to lose their jobs. Political bias is one thing and it can go far, but being funny is fundamental for a comedian. If he can't be funny, he's soon out of work. That's not too hard to understand. Duh...

:) 

Michael

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