I damn the men of earth.


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5 minutes ago, MereMortal said:

I think the phrase describes man's attitude about the universe, not the universe itself.  It goes like this: "I have a benevolent view of the universe.  It's a wonderful place and I can prosper in it."  

Bob is right, but so are you.

--Brant

context

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2 minutes ago, MereMortal said:

Correct.  I have always assumed that man's attitude is the context and the only context referenced by Rand.  

Sure. It was one of her sense of life references. Her broadest along with "malevolent." Very binary. But she mixed up both Bob and yours. The universe could not be benevolent just because you think it is; it also had to be so. Malevolent implied, in her cosmology, a mis-identication and/or the wrong way of comportment.

I hasten to add I'd have to do some re-reading of her to properly support this.

--Brant

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2 hours ago, MereMortal said:

I think the phrase describes man's attitude about the universe, not the universe itself.  It goes like this: "I have a benevolent view of the universe.  It's a wonderful place and I can prosper in it."  

Good, there's the context. When a person states a "benevolent" view, he/she presupposes the "beneficial" - actual and potential - nature of and contents within the universe. He corresponds his consciousness with existence. Effectively - the stuff of good life is here, I recognize it and treasure it. (Value - valuer).

Bob: The emphasis is clearly on "OF" - i.e., the individual's benevolent view towards the universe - not an "intent" and benevolence FROM it. Obviously the universe is not goal-directed.

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3 hours ago, Brant Gaede said:

Strike "might not" for "would not."

It depends on the planet and the sun around which it goes.  There is nothing in the solar system that would be really comfortable for humans.

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3 hours ago, MereMortal said:

I think the phrase describes man's attitude about the universe, not the universe itself.  It goes like this: "I have a benevolent view of the universe.  It's a wonderful place and I can prosper in it."  

parts of it are good for humans...

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I decided to scratch an itch.

Has anybody reflected on the title of this thread?

"I damn the men of earth"

Are there any other kind of men?

I got to thinking, this title would be a good one for a science fiction novel. You have the men of Planet Whatever who feel betrayed by the men of Earth, so they mount an attack...

:)

Michael

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8 hours ago, Michael Stuart Kelly said:

I decided to scratch an itch.

Has anybody reflected on the title of this thread?

"I damn the men of earth"

Are there any other kind of men?

I got to thinking, this title would be a good one for a science fiction novel. You have the men of Planet Whatever who feel betrayed by the men of Earth, so they mount an attack...

:)

Michael

Or not betrayed.  Here is the opening into to "The Invaders"  a Quinn-Martin production:

"David  Vincent has seen Them.  Aliens  from a dying planet,  come to Earth to make it  Their  world...."  

See  

 

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Bob wrote: But if we did get to another planet that could support our kind over the years, decades and centuries  humans  perhaps could adapt themselves  so that humans could benefit themselves and be more at home in the new place. end quote

Limitations: Travel time? How much luggage can we bring? We would first need to send probes, manned or not, that would sample the air and explore the environment . . . before we embark, that would continue sending the colonists reports as they traveled.

If we do set sail for a century long flight we would need to send a colony and I like the idea of suspended animation as in the movie I just saw, “Passengers.” Why? Because the people who arrive would be earthly to the core though if a generational flight is needed, their culture will evolve into something we cannot predict. Of course the culture might be like on Star Trek’s U.S.S. Enterprise which would be fine.

I sure would not want to hear, “Warning. You are entering Klingon Space. You will immediately withdraw.”

Peter

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