Fukushima update on zerohedge shocking


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I might have posted this on Events and Happenings because that is what it is rather than just an article.

One of my friends tells me that I worry too much. But i do have a grandson who will be living in this world along with all the radiation being released into the air and ocean.

Admittedly the Pacific Ocean is huge and can certainly dilute whatever is dumped into it and heavy stuff will sink to the bottom. Still fish eat and drink in things which then work their way up the food chain, get caught, cut up and find themselves in cans on supermarket shelves for us to purchase and eat. If there happens to be a radioactive contaminant like Stronchium 90 or Cesium 137 or Plutonium that is our tough luck.

The media has not kept us informed. Japan has not been able to contain the destroyed six Fukushima powerplants which have exposed fuel rods, leaking cooling tanks, and tons of radioactive ingredients with half lives ranging from days to millions of years.

One of these articles points out that one gram of Cesium 137 spread over one square mile renders that real estate uninhabitable for one hundred years.

The article mentions that airborne plumes from Fukushima have sprinkled all over European crop land. The cows eat the grass and the babies drink the contaminated milk.

Is it true that dead fish, jelly fish, baby salmon going out to sea are being washed up on the beaches of Oregon from Alaska to Baja?

Not to worry right?

Or are we witness to the end of the species of intelligent life known as Homo sapiens?

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-08-14/we’ve-opened-gates-hell

I would like to know your thoughts. In the meantime I will hope that the latest attempt to declare our man in the White House to not be a natural born citizen is successful.

http://www.wnd.com/2014/08/obama-eligibility-case-lives/

gg

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No. We are not going to become extinct any time soon.

The Hiroshima bomb released more radioactive substances than the Fukishima melt down.

Also Dai Ichi Fukishima had a containment wall (unlike Chernobyl)

You will notice Japan is alive and well.

Ba'al Chatzaf

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Chernobyl

My understanding is that very few died there, as bad as it was.

A...

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Chernobyl

My understanding is that very few died there, as bad as it was.

A...

They evacuated the area thoroughly. The city of Propyat is virtually a ghost city. It remains to be seen what the long term effects on the children of the area will be. It is expected there will be a higher rate of cancer, but only time will tell.

The emergency crew that covered the blown out facility with boron re-enforced concrete had an extremely high rate of cancer. Something like 70 percent of the crew was dead of cancer within ten years.

There almost certainly will be high casualties among the emergency crew at Dai Ichi Fukishima. It will take about 30 years to see if there is a "spike" in cancer rates for residence who lived say, withing 50 miles of the Japanese facility.

Ba'al Chatzaf

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As is so often the case no one who comments seems to have actually read even just the headlines.

You make it sound as if the only people affected by Fukushima will be those who live near the site.

Actually hundreds of tons of radioactive elements are being released with the cooling waters into the Pacific Ocean every day. Despite dilution micro organisms concentrate and work their way up the food chain. The governments are not testing fish for radio activity. People all over the world will be consuming radioactive elements. There is no safe number of such elements and even a small dose will cause cancer in the years to come.

Listen to Helen Caldicott, M.D. on youtube.

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On the Rense website there is an ongoing series of info about the "Fukushima Nuclear Catastrophe", as they call it.

The latest interviews on Rense:

Jeff Rense interviews Richard Wilcox. 44 minutes "technically uninhabitable"?? "Tokyo should be evacuated"??

http://rense.gsradio.net:8080/rense/special/rense_Wilcox_072914.mp3

Jeff Rense interviews Yoichi Shimatsu. 45 minutes

http://rense.gsradio.net:8080/rense/special/rense_Shimatsu_081114.mp3

If these interviews are too long, that's not a problem. You can do something else while listening, multitask.

Also you can right arrow the boring parts.

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As is so often the case no one who comments seems to have actually read even just the headlines.

Seems that you may not read what a prior poster said when you use "you."

I, Adam, addressed Chernobyl only.

As an aside, there were a small number of Japanese workers who survived the first blast and took a train to Nagasaki to continue working atfor Mitsubishi.

I’m not going to go into the details of the bombings, the reasons, and why it happened. There are plenty of strong opinions on whether or not it was necessary. There are also many articles you can read about this to brush up on your history and form your own opinions. I do want to tell you a pretty amazing story, though, about one particular man who got hit by both blasts and survived to the ripe old age of 93 despite everything. To do that we should probably start with a paragraph or two regarding the radiation side of things.

(read the article for that material - nice charts)

tsutomu.jpg

When he was 29 years old, Yamaguchi worked at Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. He was in Hiroshima on a business trip when the atomic bomb dropped on August 6, 1945. He was a little less than two miles away from ground zero, getting burns and rupturing his eardrums. Compared to so many others, he was quite lucky. He tried to find the Hiroshima Mitsubishi Offices but it was just rubble. So then, he spent the night in a Hiroshima bomb shelter to try and figure out what to do next.

The next day, he followed a rumor that there were trains running in the outskirts of the city. Indeed they were, so he hopped on a train to Nagasaki. I think you know where this story is going. Arriving in Nagasaki, he found his wife and 2-year-old son. From there he made his way to the Mitsubishi office in Nagasaki and told his boss about the bomb in Hiroshima. It went something like this:

“You’re an engineer,” [the boss] barked. “Calculate it. How could one bomb…destroy a whole city?” Famous last words. [At that moment] a white light swelled inside the room. Heat prickled Yamaguchi’s skin, and he hit the deck of the ship engineering office. “I thought,” he later recalled, “the mushroom cloud followed me from Hiroshima.” (from
The Violinist’s Thumb
)

http://www.tofugu.com/2012/08/07/tsutomu-yamaguchi-the-guy-who-got-hit-by-an-atomic-bomb-twice/

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On the Rense website there is an ongoing series of info about the "Fukushima Nuclear Catastrophe", as they call it.

The latest interviews on Rense:

Jeff Rense interviews Richard Wilcox. 44 minutes "technically uninhabitable"?? "Tokyo should be evacuated"??

http://rense.gsradio.net:8080/rense/special/rense_Wilcox_072914.mp3

Jeff Rense interviews Yoichi Shimatsu. 45 minutes

http://rense.gsradio.net:8080/rense/special/rense_Shimatsu_081114.mp3

If these interviews are too long, that's not a problem. You can do something else while listening, multitask.

Also you can right arrow the boring parts.

Strange. Tokyo has not become a nuclear wasteland. I wonder why. If you want to see a nuclear wasteland, see if you can get a permit to visit Propiyat in the Ukraine. It was a major city built to service the Chernobyl nuclear plants. Now no one lives there. No one can live there long term.

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Thanks to the efforts of certain volunteers who dropped tons of concrete on the Chernobyl reactor it was successfully enclosed or contained after much radioactive elements were released. This is not the case with the six reactors in Fukushima which are exposed and releasing contaminants into the air and the water in massive amounts daily.

Given that much of this will circulate around the world for the case of those elements with exceedingly long half lives such harmful elements will find their way beyond the Northern Hemisphere into the Southern Hemisphere too. It has been said that only cockroaches will still be alive given enough time.

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Thanks to the efforts of certain volunteers who dropped tons of concrete on the Chernobyl reactor it was successfully enclosed or contained after much radioactive elements were released. This is not the case with the six reactors in Fukushima which are exposed and releasing contaminants into the air and the water in massive amounts daily.

Given that much of this will circulate around the world for the case of those elements with exceedingly long half lives such harmful elements will find their way beyond the Northern Hemisphere into the Southern Hemisphere too. It has been said that only cockroaches will still be alive given enough time.

Why aren't the bodies piling up in Tokyo? We probably get more radiation from cosmic rays which constantly bombard the planet.

Define "enough time". If we wait long enough, say several hundred million years the roaches will inherit the earth.

Ba'al Chatzaf

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Gulch, you're an M.D. If small amounts of radiation were deadly there couldn't be radiation oncology. The patient gets dosed, goes home to recover and goes back for more. For people there are two types of radiation divided by dosage: tolerable and intolerable. Radiation hormesis (if true) means a relatively small amount is beneficial. If all people got the radiation dose they'd get at 35,000 feet in an airplane continually on the ground there would likely be a statistically beneficial result of much less cancer overall. There is, of course, an over the mountain point where the radiation generates increasing amounts of cancer, but that point is much higher than that defunct Japanese reactor will ever globally generate. That would likely even be true for General Thermonuclear War, On the Beach to the contrary notwithstanding.

--Brant

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Brant,

There is no tolerable dose of many of the radioactive particles generated by Fukushima and I fear many people will be affected not just those close to the site.

If so there is no tolerable dose of the cosmic rays that bombard us every second of every day everywhere on the surface of the earth.

Gulch! We are doomed! None of us will live forever.....

Ba'al Chatzaf

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 year later...

No. We are not going to become extinct any time soon.

The Hiroshima bomb released more radioactive substances than the Fukishima melt down.

Also Dai Ichi Fukishima had a containment wall (unlike Chernobyl)

Revisiting this for latest news http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-12-10/tepco-admits-fukushima-radiation-leaks-have-spiked-sharply

and some very old news http://web.archive.org/web/20130430183954/http://seekingalpha.com/instablog/135406-alan-von-altendorf/157949-fukushima-build-a-seawall-pronto

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