NASA'S Fermi catches thunderstorm hurling anti-matter into space!


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http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/GLAST/news/fermi-thunderstorms.html <<<NASA recreation video

Scientists using NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have detected beams of antimatter produced above thunderstorms on Earth, a phenomenon never seen before.

Scientists think the antimatter particles were formed in a terrestrial gamma-ray flash (TGF), a brief burst produced inside thunderstorms and shown to be associated with lightning. It is estimated that about 500 TGFs occur daily worldwide, but most go undetected.

"These signals are the first direct evidence that thunderstorms make antimatter particle beams," said Michael Briggs, a member of Fermi's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) team at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH). He presented the findings Monday, during a news briefing at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Seattle.

NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected beams of antimatter launched by thunderstorms. Acting like enormous particle accelerators, the storms can emit gamma-ray flashes, called TGFs, and high-energy electrons and positrons. Scientists now think that most TGFs produce particle beams and antimatter. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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http://www.nasa.gov/...nderstorms.html <<<NASA recreation video

Scientists using NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have detected beams of antimatter produced above thunderstorms on Earth, a phenomenon never seen before.

Scientists think the antimatter particles were formed in a terrestrial gamma-ray flash (TGF), a brief burst produced inside thunderstorms and shown to be associated with lightning. It is estimated that about 500 TGFs occur daily worldwide, but most go undetected.

"These signals are the first direct evidence that thunderstorms make antimatter particle beams," said Michael Briggs, a member of Fermi's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) team at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH). He presented the findings Monday, during a news briefing at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Seattle.

NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected beams of antimatter launched by thunderstorms. Acting like enormous particle accelerators, the storms can emit gamma-ray flashes, called TGFs, and high-energy electrons and positrons. Scientists now think that most TGFs produce particle beams and antimatter. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Ah, yes, but what is Phil's role in all this? Mighty suspicious.

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http://www.nasa.gov/...nderstorms.html <<<NASA recreation video

Scientists using NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have detected beams of antimatter produced above thunderstorms on Earth, a phenomenon never seen before.

Scientists think the antimatter particles were formed in a terrestrial gamma-ray flash (TGF), a brief burst produced inside thunderstorms and shown to be associated with lightning. It is estimated that about 500 TGFs occur daily worldwide, but most go undetected.

"These signals are the first direct evidence that thunderstorms make antimatter particle beams," said Michael Briggs, a member of Fermi's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) team at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH). He presented the findings Monday, during a news briefing at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Seattle.

NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected beams of antimatter launched by thunderstorms. Acting like enormous particle accelerators, the storms can emit gamma-ray flashes, called TGFs, and high-energy electrons and positrons. Scientists now think that most TGFs produce particle beams and antimatter. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Interesting. Verrrrry.... Interesting. I assume the Fermi Gamma ray technicians ran a thorough diagnostic on their measuring devices to make pretty well sure they are not detecting an artifact.

The second time this happens, preferably with a different set of devices we have yet Another New Fact to account for. This is precisely what makes science interesting. New Facts is what keeps the scientists sharp and is yet another demonstration that we cannot pull the Cosmos out of an A Priori arse hole.

Ba'al Chatzaf

Edited by BaalChatzaf
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I really enjoyed this! How kewl are those graphics?

Ah, yes, but what is Phil's role in all this? Mighty suspicious.

Hard to say. Conventional wisdom would say Chuck Norris is behind it, as in most things. However, Phil seems to be giving it a bit of a run these days. I suppose if he ate too much Taco Bell we could make a case for him being the cause of the phenomena.

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It just occurred to me. If anti-matter can be produced locally and cheaply (how much does a thunderstorm cost?) then suppose we could confine the anti-matter in a very strong magnetic field? Pretty soon we can start building star ships like Enterprise. I exaggerate. However if we could bottle the anti-matter made in our atmosphere it might be a very interesting energy source or at least an envelope for story energy, lots of it.

Whoever says we have an energy shortage simply does not know what he/she is talking about.

Ba'al Chatzaf

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> Ah, yes, but what is Phil's role in all this? Mighty suspicious.

> Hard to say. Conventional wisdom would say Chuck Norris is behind it, as in most things. However, Phil seems to be giving it a bit of a run these days. I suppose if he ate too much Taco Bell we could make a case for him being the cause of the phenomena.

Guys, I always appreciate when a thread turns to a discussion of me. Or, best of all, has my name in in the title. (Hat tips to Jonathan and Rich.)

So in order to further that noble goal, I will reveal that not only am I half-alligator and kin to a snapping turtle, I -crap- lightning and -fart- anti-matter. Some of it makes its way up to the stratosphere and that is what the scientists were detecting.

Modestly and Crockettishly Yours,....

Edited by Philip Coates
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