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pippi

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> Rich Engles fer shure! [wss]

You got it!

> I do recall that one of my own slovenly rants seemed to hit your funnybone

I'm thinking of making you honorary Mr. Bojangles Junior because of your eclectic writing style :-) Do you tap dance in a jail cell or drinks a bit? :-)

> why do you flounce out of OL saying you're not posting anymore, and then come back and post a week or so later? [sjw]

I didn't. I believe I said I was cutting back - if you read the full post carefully.

(Also: Have I spoken to you about not using the non-objective, Perigo word 'flounce'? Another example of lazy mental habits.)

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That's damn skippy right, Phil. It is also very cute when you try to make a funny--once or twice (in the last ten or more years) you have managed to pop a few corks. And there is no doubt that you are a very gracious punching bag.

The thing is, though, when you really cause me the yuk-yuks comes not so much from what you initially post, but in the more economical replies to the various forms of beatings following said posting.

This "Mr. Bojangles" thing, though. Not good, Phil; "it is neither fun nor funny." Very awkward, amateur work, Phil. You see, when you make a comparison like that, it has to have a little more weight to it.

I can see how you might have gone about effing this one up, though--rookie error. The song lyrics, of course, end up chorusing "dance...dance...." etc. and that might have been where you were pulling--I can't imagine much else, because I am intimately familiar with the history of both the song, and the person it was written about. For those of you who are not, I will paste in the lyrics and a sypnosis (probably from Wiki, hmmm....anyway let's do that):

I knew a man Bojangles and he'd dance for you in worn out shoes

Silver hair, ragged shirt and baggy pants, that old soft shoe

He'd jump so high, he'd jump so high, then he lightly touched down

Mr. Bojangles, Mr. Bojangles, dance.

I met him in a cell in New Orleans, I was down and out

He looked to me to be the eyes of age as he spoke right out

He talked of life, he talked of life, laughing slapped his leg stale

Mr. Bojangles, Mr. Bojangles, dance.

He said the name Bojangles and he danced a lick all across the cell

He grabbed his pants for a better stance, oh he jumped so high and he clicked

up his heels

He let go laugh, he let go laugh, shook back his clothes all around

Mr. Bojangles, Mr. Bojangles, dance, yeah, dance.

He danced for those at minstrel shows and county fairs throughtout the south

He spoke with tears of 15 years of how his dog and him but just travelled all about

His dog up and died, he up and died, and after 20 years he still grieves

Mr. Bojangles, Mr. Bojangles, dance.

He said I dance now at every chance at honky-tonks for drinks and tips

But most of the time I spend behind these county bars, cause I drink so bit

He shook his head, yes he shook his head, I heard someone ask him, please,

Mr. Bojangles, Mr. Bojangles, dance, dance, Mr Bojangles, dance.

Bill "Bojangles" Robinson (May 25, 1878 - November 25, 1949) was an American tap dancer and actor of stage and film. Audiences enjoyed his understated style, which eschewed the frenetic manner of the jitterbug in favor of cool and reserve; rarely did he use his upper body, relying instead on busy, inventive feet and an expressive face.

A figure in both the Black and White entertainment worlds of his era he is best known today for his dancing with Shirley Temple in a series of films during the 1930s.

See, there just isn't enough there--this is a very specific, accurate description of (and a tribute to) the beloved, iconic performer Bill Robinson. A black tap dancer. Well, there is a bit here: I am not black, but I did take tap when I was a kid. Also, a couple of years ago, I learned East Coast jitterbug (and cha-cha) because I was dating a ballerina/tap/bellydancer and she kind of jammed me into that, which did not require much persuasion, because I was motivated by the thought of going out dancing with her at swing joints and so forth--she was hot to have as your partner on the dance floor, let me tell you what. . .hot on numerous levels. So I studied with her, as well as Valerie Salstrom, who is one of the North American Lindy Hop champions. I liked dancing with her, too, oh yes. . .again, numerous levels! That is a fun story, but I am hogging the table. I guess we could say, then, that perhaps Phil understands that I do make some sort of connection between jazz dancing and jazzy writing. But Phil, I rarely find the need to write in a "frenetic" style, any more than I do frenetic jitterbugging (which, of the two, is much more difficult)--no, Phil, my body rhythms are much deeper than that.

Anyway, you can see why this whole BoJangles thing is too thin. I've done better numbers on myself. If you really want to properly dispense with me, Phil, I would recommend that you ask me to ghost write something on your behalf. I'll just message you the raw text, and you can do whatever else you want with it. I will not require you to be beholden to me for this, Phil--the only thing I have to insist upon is that you sign your full name to it.

Warmest Regards,

Richard "Mr. Bill 'Bojangles' Robinson" D. Engle

Bill_Robinson.jpg

Edited by Rich Engle
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(Also: Have I spoken to you about not using the non-objective, Perigo word 'flounce'? Another example of lazy mental habits.)

It's not a "Perigo" word, it's an English word, and it perfectly describes what you did. In case you are too lazy to look it up, here it is:

Flounce. Noun: An exaggerated action, typically intended to express one's annoyance or impatience.

Shayne

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4. In the case of Jonathan, I have repeatedly seen a great deal of malice - toward myself, toward Newberry, toward Rand, toward others. (I wouldn't call him lazy or a 'slothful poster' though.)

Of course. Laughing at Phil's vices is malicious. Correcting Newberry's falsehoods is malicious. Challenging Rand's contradictions and inconsistencies is malicious.

What actually angers Phil so much about me is how rational and substantive I've been in challenging certain bits of foolishness perpetrated by Rand and her followers. He can't answer my criticisms, just as Newberry can't, and just as Rand wouldn't have been able to, and that's apparently very frustrating to him. I think the difference between Rand, Newberry and Phil is that, in regard to any issue, there's a good chance that, when cornered (intellectually speaking), Rand would have been willing to face reality and alter her judgments accordingly, where Newberry digs in his heels and just sort of hopes to wish his errors out of existence, and where Phil doesn't even really have a clue about what's being discussed, and is too angry and lazy to learn, so he's left with little more than shallow tactics like whining about how "malicious" others are in disagreeing with the side that he wants to win.

J

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At this rate, poor Pippi is going to be stuck at minimum wage forever.

I'd suggest to Phil he put me on his "ignore" list. It's obvious he doesn't get anything from reading me, and little from anyone else. If your primary concern is form over substance, you're going to be talking past just about everybody.

--Brant

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2. In the case on ND, he has a good mind (as do you), but is prone to fire off a humorous video clip or a one-liner rather than take the time to think something through precisely. He also resorts to the lazy tactic of dealing in personalities too much.

Concerning one liners etc. my attitude is if that’s all someone has the time or inclination to offer, fine. Glad to have it, oftentimes. If one disagrees with another’s posts, however laconic, they can rebut and maybe a conversation will develop. Rarely do I take the time to compose something substantial, and given my priorities that’s exactly the way it ought to be. I don’t get paid to contribute here, and if I were an academic I couldn’t use OL to help me get tenure, so this is totally gratuitous and done for enjoyment in my free time. You don’t like it? Try the ignore feature. It’s time you recognized that you have no say concerning the guest list. You have lots of free time? Good for you, post all you want just don’t be a dick about it. If I were pippi I’d have been offended and/or humiliated by your first post. What’s funny is that Bob Kolker is always apologizing for his (aspie) lack of social skills, but you’re so much worse and are seemingly clueless about it. Here’s someone (pippi) who’s taken the time to seek out this forum, and identified with it enough to share her personal woes…forget it, I don’t have time for this and others have already said it well enough. And besides, you’re immutable, I may as well talk to a brick wall.

PS the fact that I just took the time to write this should not be interpreted to mean that I give a rat's ass what you think of me.

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a few pompous bozos is not enough to humiliate me

quite the opposite I am quite appreciative of all the advice and support I got.

no one is going to keep this uneducated slovenly bingo playin trailer park queen down

you betcha! :P

see i can even use punkchuashun gollee

Edited by pippi
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My point with Pippi's lack of caps and 'text message' style is that it might be easier or more appropriate for a chat list, but it would *appear* in an employer's mind to suggest

um this is a chat list sparky (not an employment application)

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My point with Pippi's lack of caps and 'text message' style is that it might be easier or more appropriate for a chat list, but it would *appear* in an employer's mind to suggest

um this is a chat list sparky (not an employment application)

YES!

Pippi scores from behind the blue line with a solid slap shot past ole' Phils rigid defenses!

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Does anyone honestly still think job and career success has anything to do with qualities like brains, hard work, determination, and passion?

Success is based on one thing nowadays, and that is simply one's ability to (as I say) "play the game."

i wish i could disagree with you chris but i dont...that is why i have a hard time with objectivism and the 'real world' they just dont seem to gel alot of the time..esp esp especially now with the job market so poor

my min wage job just told me i have to take responsibility for errors that were out of my control (it is customer service work-aka the pit of hell) i.e. the company didnt deliver what the person ordered or overcharged them etc- and i am getting a written warning over it.

i was even told by my supervisor even if i disagree with my rating and warning i have to pretend it was my fault.

ps thanks selene !

Edited by pippi
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Does anyone honestly still think job and career success has anything to do with qualities like brains, hard work, determination, and passion?

Success is based on one thing nowadays, and that is simply one's ability to (as I say) "play the game."

I didn't know you hadn't yet read The Fountainhead.

--Brant

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Does anyone honestly still think job and career success has anything to do with qualities like brains, hard work, determination, and passion?

Success is based on one thing nowadays, and that is simply one's ability to (as I say) "play the game."

This goes to far but it is certainly true that to the degree fascism has infiltrated the economy then to that degree the above is true (except that it's fine to have all those attributes when brains are absent).

Those who apply libertarian principles to the present economy without taking into account how deeply fascism has infiltrated it (e.g., touting big business while ignoring that most big business is big because of political favors) are sometimes called "vulgar libertarians". Objectivists are "vulgar libertarians" par excellence. Objectivists are generally oblivious about the insidious ways in which fascism is distorting the American economy, precisely because Objectivism as a philosophy has fascist streaks in it.

Use "Look Inside", and search for "nock", should take you to a section on Economism/Fascism which addresses this aspect of American fascism in some detail: http://www.amazon.com/Individual-Rights-Treatise-Human-Relations/dp/0984587004/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1294356148&sr=8-1

Shayne

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Does anyone honestly still think job and career success has anything to do with qualities like brains, hard work, determination, and passion?

Success is based on one thing nowadays, and that is simply one's ability to (as I say) "play the game."

I didn't know you hadn't yet read The Fountainhead.

--Brant

I read the fountainhead and atlas about 5 or more times each-things arent that black and white especially now-what sjw wrote is true big business is only big alot of the time because the government is 'helping' them (and the unions)

I read awhile back there were whole years when GE paid NO TAXES-I will find a link

And roark would have been fired after 1 day in this job market for not being a team player. It isnt enough anymore to just be polite-you have to go the extra mile (you all know what i mean)

I highly doubt Roark would have survived going the route he did in today's world (starting his own company with no name no degree and no friends)

Brant can you explain more what you are meaning by your comment?

Edited by pippi
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Pippi:

I believe Brant was pointing out to Baker that the theme of the Fountainhead was precisely that you will not "succeed" if you do not play the game, a la Peter Keating.

In his beautifully subtle, sardonic and surgical way, he was pointing out to Baker that it has been obvious to us who have read Ayn's works that the playing the game was clearly stated.

Therefore, Baker should have not had to state the obvious if he had read the Fountainhead which he sure should have read to be here on OL!

Adam

Post Script: You are more than welcome Pippi

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Does anyone honestly still think job and career success has anything to do with qualities like brains, hard work, determination, and passion?

Success is based on one thing nowadays, and that is simply one's ability to (as I say) "play the game."

I didn't know you hadn't yet read The Fountainhead.

--Brant

I read the fountainhead and atlas about 5 or more times each-things arent that black and white especially now-what sjw wrote is true big business is only big alot of the time because the government is 'helping' them (and the unions)

And roark would have been fired after 1 day in this job market for not being a team player. I highly doubt he would survive going to route he did in today's world (starting his own company with no name and no friends)

I read awhile back there were whole years when GE paid NO TAXES

I will find a link

Brant can you explain more what you are meaning by your comment?

I'm going to make a prediction and say that this blind spot is going to be Objectivism's (qua official/ARI movement) cultural downfall. Atlas Shrugged did not seem to have this fascism defect in significant measure* (on the contrary, Atlas illustrates the big business/government connection), but Objectivism's political philosophy itself does, both in explicit emphasis and particular in how it is practiced by ARI Objectivists.

Americans are smarter than that. They look at things like the 2008 bailout, compare it to what Objectivists are saying, and mock the Objectivists for being morons. This unfortunately leaves an opening for the communists, which as we saw with the Obama election have gained some ground lately. In politics, barring genuine understanding of fundamental problems, any fascist tendency will cause a swing to communist tendencies, and vice versa.

Shayne

* Atlas does have a bit of of Nietzscheanism in it

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Pippi:

I believe Brant was pointing out to Baker that the theme of the Fountainhead was precisely that you will not "succeed" if you do not play the game, a la Peter Keating.

In his beautifully subtle, sardonic and surgical way, he was pointing out to Baker that it has been obvious to us who have read Ayn's works that the playing the game was clearly stated.

Therefore, Baker should have not had to state the obvious if he had read the Fountainhead which he sure should have read to be here on OL!

Adam

Post Script: You are more than welcome Pippi

well-i guess i am dense I am still not getting the point (have fun phil and co) roark didnt play the game and he succeeded-is the fact you put 'the game' in quotes mean that rand had no respect for the game and didnt want to win it?

thanks

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Pippi:

I believe Brant was pointing out to Baker that the theme of the Fountainhead was precisely that you will not "succeed" if you do not play the game, a la Peter Keating.

In his beautifully subtle, sardonic and surgical way, he was pointing out to Baker that it has been obvious to us who have read Ayn's works that the playing the game was clearly stated.

Therefore, Baker should have not had to state the obvious if he had read the Fountainhead which he sure should have read to be here on OL!

Adam

Post Script: You are more than welcome Pippi

well-i guess i am dense I am still not getting the point (have fun phil and co) roark didnt play the game and he succeeded-is the fact you put 'the game' in quotes mean that rand had no respect for the game and didnt want to win it?

thanks

Pippi:

That is what I believe that Brant meant. I guess we will have to wait until he informs us. Roark's success was a standout rarity from the game players or the normal successful architects.

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