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Once in a while there will be a reference to Ayn Rand on the popular TV show Jeopardy.

Today the contestants were asked which book had the working title "The Strike." The ultimate winner correctly answered with the question, What is Atlas Shrugged?

Always good to see Ayn Rand's famous novel mentioned before an audience of several million people.

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gulch

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Once in a while there will be a reference to Ayn Rand on the popular TV show Jeopardy.

Today the contestants were asked which book had the working title "The Strike." The ultimate winner correctly answered with the question, What is Atlas Shrugged?

Always good to see Ayn Rand's famous novel mentioned before an audience of several million people.

www.campaignforliberty.com 230,014

gulch

I saw it, and one little detail you didn't mention is that it was a $200 clue in the first round. Meaning it was a giveaway, the writers expected it to be answered correctly. Good sign.

The category, BTW, was 50's novels.

Edited by Ninth Doctor
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I guess that means at some point there will be a Final Jeopardy question about Little Streets". See the tread "I knew this would come back."

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  • 3 months later...

Tonight we had a redux, this time the Final Jeopardy category was "American Novelists", the answer was (paraphrasing): this novelist and advocate of capitalism was laid out in 1982 next to a 6 foot tall dollar sign. All three players got the right answer.

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Did they pronounce it correctly?

Only Trebek was tasked with pronouncing the name, it being Final Jeopardy, and yes he got it right, 3 or 4 times in fact. He definitely said “Ayn” correctly, but I tend to pronounce the vowel in Rand like canned or banned, he used a somewhat fuller vowel, close to wand. It was correct though.

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Alex Trebek is from Canada which might have something to do with his pronunciation. He's one of my favorites btw.

Also his clothes are great. Very stylish.

Ba'al Chatzaf

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  • 5 months later...

There was another one tonight. It went something like: "John Galt quits the 20th century motor company when it goes socialist", the answer (ahem, question) being "what is Atlas Shrugged". The first person to ring in got it right. I don't remember the category, but it was something along the lines of name the book by plot element.

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Did they pronounce it correctly?

Only Trebek was tasked with pronouncing the name, it being Final Jeopardy, and yes he got it right, 3 or 4 times in fact. He definitely said "Ayn" correctly, but I tend to pronounce the vowel in Rand like canned or banned, he used a somewhat fuller vowel, close to wand. It was correct though.

Interesting. Where are you from, Dennis? Do you pronounce the vowels in "have" and in "halve" the same or differently?

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Did they pronounce it correctly?

Only Trebek was tasked with pronouncing the name, it being Final Jeopardy, and yes he got it right, 3 or 4 times in fact. He definitely said "Ayn" correctly, but I tend to pronounce the vowel in Rand like canned or banned, he used a somewhat fuller vowel, close to wand. It was correct though.

Interesting. Where are you from, Dennis? Do you pronounce the vowels in "have" and in "halve" the same or differently?

Ted:

Now this interests me. I pronounce Rand and canned. And I pronounce the halve with what I think is a Boston muted "a" and pronounce have differently. What does that establish?

I enjoy trying to calculate where persons are from by their speech and physiognomy. I floored a very attractive Doctor about two months ago by asking...out of curiosity, are you from the Ukraine. Well you might have thought I had told her what color her nipples were because she was pleasantly stunned. We have established a nice friendship.

Adam

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Did they pronounce it correctly?

Only Trebek was tasked with pronouncing the name, it being Final Jeopardy, and yes he got it right, 3 or 4 times in fact. He definitely said "Ayn" correctly, but I tend to pronounce the vowel in Rand like canned or banned, he used a somewhat fuller vowel, close to wand. It was correct though.

Interesting. Where are you from, Dennis? Do you pronounce the vowels in "have" and in "halve" the same or differently?

Ted:

Now this interests me. I pronounce Rand and canned. And I pronounce the halve with what I think is a Boston muted "a" and pronounce have differently. What does that establish?

I enjoy trying to calculate where persons are from by their speech and physiognomy. I floored a very attractive Doctor about two months ago by asking...out of curiosity, are you from the Ukraine. Well you might have thought I had told her what color her nipples were because she was pleasantly stunned. We have established a nice friendship.

Adam

My father married a Ukrainian chick, so I know the attraction. I will answer the linguistics question shortly in the linguistics thread.

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Interesting. Where are you from, Dennis? Do you pronounce the vowels in "have" and in "halve" the same or differently?

Miami. I don’t have any accent in particular. I would say have and halve about the same, but the “L” in halve does affect the vowel since the tongue gets involved. So it’s the same starting vowel but as you resolve to the “L” it changes (I'm sure there's a technical term for this). Come to think of it, it might depend on what the next word is, particularly whether it starts with a vowel or a consonant. I think I would say “halve it, Jeeves” differently from “halve this slithering serpent’s tongue in twain”. You know what, I really don’t say “halve” very often.

What’s the point, what does this establish?

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Interesting. Where are you from, Dennis? Do you pronounce the vowels in "have" and in "halve" the same or differently?

Miami. I don't have any accent in particular. I would say have and halve about the same, but the "L" in halve does affect the vowel since the tongue gets involved. So it's the same starting vowel but as you resolve to the "L" it changes (I'm sure there's a technical term for this). Come to think of it, it might depend on what the next word is, particularly whether it starts with a vowel or a consonant. I think I would say "halve it, Jeeves" differently from "halve this slithering serpent's tongue in twain". You know what, I really don't say "halve" very often.

What's the point, what does this establish?

You express what are some common misconceptions or inexactitudes. To say that one doesn't have an accent is a common enough thing. But of course every person has a particular accent, just as every person has a particular weight or height. What you obviously mean is that you have something approaching what is called a general American accent, rather than a stereotypical regional accent. Your accent can still be specified by various tests.

Do the following words rhyme in your speech?

hoarse and horse

cot and caught

Dawn and Don

marry and Mary

merry and marry

merry and Mary

Murray and merry

water and hotter

water and daughter

water and footer

water and butter

writer and rider

writer and spider

rider and spider

Your comment that the ell affects the pronunciation of halve is an incipient form of what is called spelling pronunciation. If the ell affected the pronunciation of halve (to cut in half) then the word would rhyme with valve. which it does not do for any native speaker of English.

Edited by Ted Keer
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Do the following words rhyme in your speech?

hoarse and horse

cot and caught

Dawn and Don

marry and Mary

merry and marry

merry and Mary

Murray and merry

water and hotter

water and daughter

water and footer

water and butter

writer and rider

writer and spider

rider and spider

So where can we take this test and get the answers? :)

Judith

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Do the following words rhyme in your speech?

hoarse and horse

cot and caught

Dawn and Don

marry and Mary

merry and marry

merry and Mary

Murray and merry

water and hotter

water and daughter

water and footer

water and butter

writer and rider

writer and spider

rider and spider

So where can we take this test and get the answers? :)

This reminds me of the scene in the movie Gettysburg in which there is an encounter between a Union Army officer and Confederate captors. It is a civil conversation. The Confederate says they are fighting for their rights. With his accent it sounds like "rats."

I love the movie in which every word uttered is documented to have actually been spoken historically. Based on the book Killer Angels.

Judith

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Your comment that the ell affects the pronunciation of halve is an incipient form of what is called spelling pronunciation. If the ell affected the pronunciation of halve (to cut in half) then the word would rhyme with valve. which it does not do for any native speaker of English.

Thinking about it may affect the pronunciation, but I say yes, there is a subtle difference between halve and half, also writer and rider (d and t aren't the same consonant, ask a trumpet player). Dawn and Don also are a little different (the vowel resolution), water and hotter (the double "t" causing a full stop on the consonant), that's about it. Murray and merry have different first vowels, I suppose they still rhyme though. You have to demonstrate the difference in sound, writing about this isn't easy.

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  • 2 months later...

Looks like they have AR on a quarterly rotation. Anyway, tonight the category was Women Authors, it was the 3rd clue down in double jeopardy, and, paraphrasing: This author's "The Fountainhead" was rejected by 12 publishers, some claiming it was too controversial. The first person to ring in got it right.

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  • 2 months later...

Looks like they have AR on a quarterly rotation.

Maybe they've decided to increase her to a bimonthly rotation! Tonight there was a category, "Celebrities Favorite Novels" (or something like that), and Pat Sajak gave the $400 clue, crap I don't recall the exact phrasing but it was 1957 novel by Ayn Rand with maybe something about individualism. The Great Gatsby and The Sun also Rises were two of the other answers in the category.

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Looks like they have AR on a quarterly rotation.

Maybe they've decided to increase her to a bimonthly rotation! Tonight there was a category, "Celebrities Favorite Novels" (or something like that), and Pat Sajak gave the $400 clue, crap I don't recall the exact phrasing but it was 1957 novel by Ayn Rand with maybe something about individualism. The Great Gatsby and The Sun also Rises were two of the other answers in the category.

O Jeopardy O mores! Anybody mentioned lately that Alex is not, like a real American?

Ninth here is one for you: category, opera singers who remind you of Ayn Rand.Answer: She wore a breastplate and conquered Isabel Bayrakdarian in her Cleopatra bling. Hit the buzzer!

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Today, Monday, May 23rd, 2012, one of the Jeopardy answers in the category Favorite Books, was a video of Alex Trebek of Wheel of Fortune fame, who said the novel had an individualistic theme and came out in 1957, with a mythical character's name in the title.

A contestent questioned correctly: What is Atlas Shrugged?

Several million more get to hear about it.

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Ninth here is one for you: category, opera singers who remind you of Ayn Rand.Answer: She wore a breastplate and conquered Isabel Bayrakdarian in her Cleopatra bling. Hit the buzzer!

Sorry, I was watching House. I'm betting the opera in question is Julius Caesar by Handel, and so I would guess the singer is David Daniels. But you're asking for a she. Trick question? I saw David Daniels do the role in Chicago opposite Danielle DeNiese oh, maybe 5 years ago. Anyway, I don't know. I'm not really into Baroque opera, not very much.

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Today, Monday, May 23rd, 2012, one of the Jeopardy answers in the category Favorite Books, was a video of Alex Trebek of Wheel of Fortune fame, who said the novel had an individualistic theme and came out in 1957, with a mythical character's name in the title.

No, not Alex Trebek, but Pat Sajak. This guy:

boomer-pat-sajak.jpg

Not this guy:

alex-trebek-picture.jpg

And the category was "Celebrities Favorite Books", meaning Pat Sajak is declaring this his personal favorite.

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Ninth Doctor,

Thank you for the correction. Its been a long day filled with strenuous activity and I am exhausted and obviously not thinking.

As a token of my appreciation here is a link to a BeforeITsNews.com article which contends that the Birth Certificate of one Barack Hussein Obama was found at Mombasa hospital in Kenya:

http://beforeitsnews.com/story/76/526/Proof_Positive:_Documents_Showing_Obama_Was_Born_In_Kenya,_Africa.html

I have chosen to bury this tidbit here rather than start a new thread as this issue has been beaten to death. Most Americans believe eligibility depends on being born on American soil. My understanding is that the Founders thought that having both parents who were American citizens was necessary to have a future president raised by those who were loyal to America first. I have posted here that Vattel's Laws of Nations published in 1755 or thereabouts was widely read by the Founders which explains why they thought it unnecessary to give a complete definition of the concept: Natural Born Citizen.

Presumably if both of Obama's parents were American citizens at the time of his birth that would fulfill that requirement. Still residency would play a role as well.

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