Scientists take a step closer to an elixir of youth


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Here is something to be optimistic about. It's still early, but I really like the direction.

Michael

Scientists take a step closer to an elixir of youth

By Richard Alleyne

Telegraph

20 Nov 2008

Researchers believe boosting the amount of a naturally forming enzyme in the body could prevent cells dying and so lead to extended, healthier, lifespans..

The protein telomerase helps maintain the protective caps at the ends of chromosomes which act like the ends of shoelaces and stop them unravelling.

As we age, and our cells divide, these caps become frayed and shorter and eventually are so damaged that the cell dies. Scientists believe boosting our natural levels of telomerase could rejuvenate them.

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Here is something to be optimistic about. It's still early, but I really like the direction.

Michael

Scientists take a step closer to an elixir of youth

By Richard Alleyne

Telegraph

20 Nov 2008

Researchers believe boosting the amount of a naturally forming enzyme in the body could prevent cells dying and so lead to extended, healthier, lifespans..

The protein telomerase helps maintain the protective caps at the ends of chromosomes which act like the ends of shoelaces and stop them unravelling.

As we age, and our cells divide, these caps become frayed and shorter and eventually are so damaged that the cell dies. Scientists believe boosting our natural levels of telomerase could rejuvenate them.

Believed when seen.

Ba'al Chatzaf

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This is old news, and far too oversimplified. They have known about telomeres since at least the 1980's. Chromosomes have a limited number of telomeres, and each normal cell division removes one of the limited number of copies from the end. The common word for unlimited cell division is cancer. Messing with telemores in vivo is far different from keeping cells alive in a dish culture. Indeed, the normal way of making immortal cell cultures is to convert them into cancers. There is a transmissable cancer known in dogs, and there is a good chance that a transmissable cancer among Tasmanian Devils will drive them extinct. Seek a happy life and immortality in your work and children.

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This is old news, and far too oversimplified. They have known about telomeres since at least the 1980's. Chromosomes have a limited number of telomeres, and each normal cell division removes one of the limited number of copies from the end. The common word for unlimited cell division is cancer. Messing with telemores in vivo is far different from keeping cells alive in a dish culture. Indeed, the normal way of making immortal cell cultures is to convert them into cancers. There is a transmissable cancer known in dogs, and there is a good chance that a transmissable cancer among Tasmanian Devils will drive them extinct. Seek a happy life and immortality in your work and children.

A lot of stuff works or seems to work in test tubes. It usually stops there.

--Brant

Edited by Brant Gaede
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