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BaalChatzaf

On this very day, April Ninteenth

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It was on this very day April 19, in the year 1775 that the Minute Men of Lexington Massachusetts gathered on the Green to face the British Regulars marching up from Boston to seize arms and gunpowder stored in Concord. The Minutemen had been warned of the approach of the Regulars by Paul Revere and William Dawes riding on horseback to spread the news.

The Regulars showed up around two in the morning. The Minutemen had been given their orders by their commander, Capt. John Parker. The orders were brief and clear: "Stand your ground, do not fire unless fired upon, but if they mean to have a war, let it start here".

There was an exchange of fire. Eight of the Lexington militia men were shot dead and several others were wounded. The British Regulars marched north to Concord where they were met by other Minutemen on the bridge over the Concord River. There fighting erupted. That day the British Regulars lost over a hundred men to rebel gunshot discharged from behind walls and trees. The Brits were rescued by a relief column sent up from Boston. At days end, there was no going back. The war was on, the Revolution had begun with shot and blood. The world has not been the same since.

The battles at Lexington and Concord lack the high drama of the stand of the 300 Spartans at Thermopylae, but the effect on the world was greater and will be remembered for as long as men recall battles for liberty and independence from tyranny. The Spartans were soldiers first, always and only. That is what the -were-. The men at Lexington Green were just plain folks who were soldiers because they had to be. Which was the greater heroism?

Ba'al Chatzaf.

Edited by BaalChatzaf

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I think the acts of heroism stand equal for all the reasons you listed and because you could also argue that the 300 Spartans at Thermopylae defended freedom as much as did the minutemen. The 300 Spartans (and a few thousand friends) stood up to a Persian empire. Sparta was not the bastion of freedom that the movie 300[/] made it out to be, but Athens was very much free (as far as the times went at the very least). The minuteman's intent was to defend freedom though.

On the other hand, I very much appreciate the point that you are making and join you in paying respects to the people who fought for my freedom. America is the greatest country in the world, we have them to thank for that.

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Ba'al; Thanks for the reminder of the day. The men at Lexington Green certainly got things started. A lot of brave people had to finish it. We should never forget them.

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I think the acts of heroism stand equal for all the reasons you listed and because you could also argue that the 300 Spartans at Thermopylae defended freedom as much as did the minutemen. The 300 Spartans (and a few thousand friends) stood up to a Persian empire. Sparta was not the bastion of freedom that the movie 300[/] made it out to be, but Athens was very much free (as far as the times went at the very least). The minuteman's intent was to defend freedom though.

There is no denying the courage of the Spartans. That is what they were born and bred to do, stand and fight and even die if necessary. However their motives were not liberty as such (Spartans enslaved the Helots), but -independence-. Spartan had no wish to bow the head or bend the knee to Xerxes or any other foreigner.

I point out that the Japanese Kamikze pilots (who died for an evil cause) were very Spartan in their determination. The Spartan military memes have worked their way into just about every national society, be it free or tyranny.

Ba'al Chatzaf

Edited by BaalChatzaf

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Sometimes events are done by individuals who maybe acting in way different from what will come from the event. The Spartans may not have realized all the implications but the results were good all the same. The men at Lexington Green has free men had a better grasp of what they were doing.

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Thank you! I think we've met but I hope to see you in Towson. Towson University is the site of the Atlas Society Summer Seminar July 8-14. More information at their web site.

Edited by Chris Grieb

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