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6 minutes ago, Michael Stuart Kelly said:

Jon,

Warm humor?

Good Lord!

:) 

Michael

Yes, warm humor. Are the voices in your head saying otherwise?

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1 hour ago, Jon Letendre said:

Go back to the looney bin.

Why did you just now have a negative reaction to this post, Billy?

I was just keeping it light with Tony, with some warm humor.

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This is for the general reader.

I saw this video last night. Oddly enough, I was looking into something completely unrelated to what has been going on in this thread, but man does it apply.

Although the humor thing I gave above is correct, Mark Leary gave me a frame for much of the bullshit that happens on forums and in social media.

The issue is rules of social exchange.

Some people imagine the rules of social exchange are only what is in their heads and they collide with people who are committed to their own set of rules for how others need to act in social settings.

Then, after pressure builds, they lose it over bullshit.

This is a pattern I have seen way too often to ignore.

It's even why a lot of people--ones who have preached for decades exactly what President Trump has done recently--can't stand him. He doesn't act like the way they want people to act in social exchanges.

They want to be the ones to lay down the rules, not him. And substance doesn't matter. Their thing is who controls the rules.

Michael

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One more, then I promise I’m done ...

From Hare to Heir is a Warner Bros. Merrie Melodies theatrical cartoon short released on September 3, 1960 starring Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam as Sam, Duke of Yosemite at Bedlam Manor. The cartoon was directed and written by Friz Freleng.

From Hare to Heir
Directed by Friz Freleng
Produced by John Burton, Sr.(uncredited)
Story by Friz Freleng
Starring Mel Blanc
Music by Milt Franklyn
Animation by Gerry Chiniquy 
Art Davis 
Virgil Ross
Layouts by Hawley Pratt
Backgrounds by Tom O'Loughlin
Color process Technicolor
Distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures
Release date
September 3, 1960 (USA premiere)
Running time
6 minutes 31 seconds

 

 
 
Contents
 

 

 
PlotEdit
Learn more
 
This section's plot summary may be too long or excessively detailed.

The cartoon takes place at Bedlam Manor, located somewhere in England, during the 18th Century. Sam, Duke of Yosemite finds out from one of his servants that Sam no longer has any money, because his uncle, the King, has cut off his allowance (possibly as punishment for losing his temper once too many times). After Sam punishes the servant for this message ("not having the books balanced") by giving him the "nose-in-the-book" penalty (slamming a heavy book on the servant's big nose), Bugs Bunny comes to his door as a representative of an unnamed company and offers Sam one million pounds. According to the document that Bugs reads, Sam must prove that he is worthy of the monetary gift by displaying mild temperament at all times; if he loses his temper at any time, a portion of the million pounds will be deducted, the amount depending on what Bugs thinks is suitable ("In short, whenever you blow your top, you blow some dough. Get it?"). Sam welcomes Bugs into his home, anxious to receive the one million pounds.

Bugs plays the role of an annoying house guest to test Sam's temperament. During dinner, Bugs keeps asking Sam for various condiments one by one (first asking for salt, then asking for pepper, and finally asking for olives). Sam takes it in stride at first, but then it becomes too much (as they are sitting at opposite ends of a very long dining room table) and he goes into a closet to express his vexation. It doesn't help, though, as Bugs can hear him through the door, so Sam loses £300 which is then changed to £400 after another burst of anger, prompting Sam to run outside into the distance to let off more steam.

Bugs' provoking of Sam continues that night by playing the piano while loudly and obnoxiously singing "Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair" while Sam is trying to sleep. Sam bursts out of his room and screams: "Stop that music, ya crazy rackin', frackin', varmint rabbit!". After Bugs deducts some more money, Sam requests that he play "Brahms' Lullaby" so that he can fall asleep. Bugs agrees but in the form of a one-man marching band, pacing back and forth right outside Sam's bedroom door. Of course, this ticks off Sam even more, but he is able to pretend that he likes it.

Next morning, Bugs hogs the bathroom and Sam shouts for him to get out, the first demand resulting in the door being slammed into him (without being penalized) and the second costing him another £400 plus 35 shillings. After furiously pounding his head on the piano (in which Bugs wonders what that "song" is) and realizing he's not going to have any money left if the temper-losing deductions keep up, Sam gets an idea to get rid of Bugs and make it look like an accident so that he receives the entire million. He saws a hole in the floor outside the bathroom door and covers the hole with a mat so that when Bugs comes out of the bathroom and walks over it, he'll go through and plunge into the river below. When Bugs still won't budge from the bathroom, Sam bursts in and pushes him out, but Bugs traverses across the covered hole and Sam falls through it, cursing in gibberish all the way down. A drenched Sam charges back upstairs and is told by Bugs that he can use the bathroom now. Sam charges towards Bugs but has completely forgotten about the hole between them, falling through and plunging into the river again, bellowing out the same cursive gibberish as before.

Later that day, Bugs climbs up a really long staircase (“The Alps have got nothing on these stairs for climbing.”). Sam is awaiting for him at the top, posing as a statue in armor. When Bugs gets close enough, Sam takes a swing at his head with a double-bladed axe, but Bugs ducks and he falls down the stairs. As Sam descends while ranting, raving and cursing all the way down, Bugs continuously writes out deductions.

The following day, Sam finally gets control of his temper. He shows Bugs by having his servants physically mock him with a pie in the face, a kick in the rear and a conk over the head with a rolling pin. As Sam goes through this repeatedly, Bugs looks at the camera and says: “I haven’t got the heart to tell him that he’s used up all the money” as the cartoon fades in (though it is never revealed if there actually was any money in the first place).

 

 
Usage in compilationsEdit

This cartoon was included in the 1983 compilation film Daffy Duck's Movie: Fantastic Island as Sam's wish and possibly the final classic sketch in the movie.

On April 21, 2016, VH1 Classic aired this episode following the movie Purple Rain, starring Prince.

 

 
AvailabilityEdit

"From Hare to Heir" is available, uncensored and uncut, on the Looney Tunes Superstars DVD. However, it was cropped to widescreen.[1]

 

 
See alsoEdit

 

 
ReferencesEdit
  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-12-02. Retrieved 2010-04-03.

 

 
External linksEdit
 
 

 

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Wikipedia

 
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One more, then I promise, I’m done ...

SupermanSuper-Rabbit was the 16th Bugs Bunny entry, and the 47th directed by Chuck Jones.

Super-Rabbit
LC SuperRabbit.jpg
Directed by Charles M. Jones
Produced by Leon Schlesinger
Story by Tedd Pierce
Starring Mel Blanc
Kent Rogers
Tedd Pierce
Music by Carl W. Stalling
Animation by Ken Harris
Layouts by John McGrew
Backgrounds by Gene Fleury
Color process Technicolor
Production
company 
Distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures
The Vitaphone Corporation
Release date
April 3, 1943
Running time
8 min
Language English

 

 
 
Contents
 

 

 
PlotEdit

Professor Cannafraz (a Richard Haydn impression) creates a "super carrot" and uses it on his test subject – Rabbitus idioticus americanus (Bugs Bunny), who immediately wolfs down the proffered carrot. Armed with temporary superhero abilities that need to be replenished with additional super carrots, Bugs remembers a newspaper article about Texas hunter "Cottontail" Smith, who wants to hunt down all rabbits.

Bugs flies to Deepinaharta, Texas, and assumes the moniker of a mild-mannered forest creature, complete with oversized glasses and hat. He encounters Smith, who attempts to shoot Bugs, only for the bullets to form an outline of Bugs before harmlessly falling to the ground. Bugs then hands Smith a cannon, eats another carrot then, upon being struck by the cannonball, plays basketball with it, quickly shoving Smith and his horse onto bleachers while he acts as his own cheerleader. After Bugs returns to the air, the bemused Smith and his horse fly into the sky with their own airplane. Bugs then snatches the shell of the plane away from them, plunging them to the ground.

Bugs runs out of power, but when he tries to recharge again, his carrots fall to the ground. When Bugs lands, he opens his eyes to see a line of chewed-up carrots eaten by Smith and his horse-turned-Superhero. Bugs turns to the camera and says "This looks like a job for a REAL Superman!" He ducks into a phone booth. Both Smith and the horse are ready to attack - until the booth opens and they both snap to attention and salute. Bugs marches out in a Marine uniform, singing the "Marines' Hymn." He dismisses the two, claiming he has "important work to do!", and marches off to "BerlinTokyo and points East."[1]

 

 
CreditsEdit

 

 
CastEdit

 

 
ReceptionEdit

The U.S. Marine Corps were so thrilled that Bugs Bunny decided to become a Marine in this cartoon that they insisted the character be officially inducted into the force as a private, which was done, complete with dogtags. The character was regularly promoted until Bugs was officially "discharged" at the end of World War II as a Master Sergeant.[2]

Cottontail Smith later appears as one of Yosemite Sam’s sidekicks in Looney Tunes: Back in Action. The character’s voice is a less raucous version of Sam’s and Foghorn Leghorn’s.

 

 
AnalysisEdit

The short parodies the Superman animated series as a figure soars across the sky from random directions. Onlookers are heard speculating on its nature: "Look! Up there in the sky" "It’s a boid" [bird], "Nah, it ain’t a boid, it’s a dive-bommah".[1][3]

A Marine is described as "a real superman" by Bugs.[1]

 

 
AvailabilityEdit

 

 
SourcesEdit

 

 
ReferencesEdit
  1. a b c Shull, Wilt (2004), p. 157
  2. ^ Audio commentary by Paul Dini for Super-Rabbit on the Looney Tunes Golden Collection: Volume 3 (2005).
  3. ^ Weldon (2013), unnumbered pages

 

 
External linksEdit
 
 

 

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Wikipedia

 
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Just now, Jon Letendre said:

Have I upset you?

Jon,

No.

Not in the way you seem to imagine.

But I am irritated.

I have productive work to do, not this bullshit. And my productive work is behind. But this bullshit keeps happening and it's damaging the forum.

Michael

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Oh, something productive. Sounds important.

 

Who cou,d forget Hare Trigger?!?!

Learn more
 
This article needs additional citations for verification.

Hare Trigger is a 1945 Merrie Melodies directed by Friz Freleng.

Hare Trigger
HareTrigger Lobby Card.png
Lobby card
Directed by I. Freleng
Produced by Edward Selzer (unc.)
Story by Michael Maltese
Starring Mel Blanc
Music by Carl W. Stalling
Animation by Manuel Perez
Ken Champin
Virgil Ross
Gerry Chiniquy
Jack Bradbury (unc.)
Layouts by Hawley Pratt
Backgrounds by Paul Julian
Color process Technicolor
Production
company 
Distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures
The Vitaphone Corporation
Release date
May 5, 1945 (USA)
Running time
8:00
Language English

 

 
 
Contents
 

 

 
TitleEdit

The title is a play on "hair trigger", referring to any weapon or other device with a sensitive trigger.

 

 
PlotEdit

After opening credits underscored by a lively instrumental of "Cheyenne", an old-fashioned train is seen rolling along through the desert. It passes another train going around a utility pole, and voices are heard repeating "Bread and Butter".

Bugs is riding in the mail car of a train, singing a nonsense song called "Go Get the Axe", when a pint-sized bandit attempts to rob the train (with the underscore playing stereotypical "villain music"), only to have it pass clear over his head. He then calls for his horse, which he needs a rolling step-stair to mount. He catches up and boards the train and begins to rob it while the mail clerk wraps himself in a package marked DON'T OPEN 'TIL XMAS. The bandit accidentally throws Bugs Bunny in his sack. Bugs assumes he's Jesse James. The bandit scoffs and tells him (and the audience), "I'm Yosemite Sam, the meanest, toughest, rip-roarin'-est, Edward Everett Horton-est hombre what ever packed a six-shooter!" (This pattern of Sam introducing himself to Bugs and the audience continued in other cartoons.) Bugs tells Sam that there is another tough guy in the train packing a "seven-shooter", and Sam goes looking for him – and it's Bugs in disguise.

Various fights ensue, as each character temporarily gets the upper hand for a while. In one scene Bugs dumps red ink on Sam, compelling him to think he's been shot; he collapses but eventually gets the joke. In one of the funniest moments of the toon, Sam pushes his face furiously into Bugs', then pulls back and with a quiet, offended tone asks, "Why did you pour ink on mah haid?" After another skirmish, Bugs tricks Sam into dashing into a lounge car in which a horrific fight is occurring. Stock film footage of a stereotypical western saloon fight (taken from the Warner Bros western film Dodge City, was used for this). With the sounds of crashes and bangs in the background, Bugs calmly sings "Sweet Georgia Brown" to himself. Sam emerges tottering, banged and bruised, to a comical instrumental of "Rally 'Round the Flag", and a gag occurs where Bugs affects the stereotyped voice of an African-American train porter, and has the dazed Sam convinced he's supposed to disembark the train, piling him up with luggage; Sam even hands Bugs a silver coin as a tip, and Bugs says, "Thank you, suh!" As Sam steps off the moving train, the mail-drop hook grabs him and temporarily whisks him off the train. Bugs thinks he has vanquished Sam, and yells, "So long, screwy, see ya in Saint Louie!" a line that will be echoed in Wild and Woolly Hare and A Feather in His Hare. But Sam gets back on board somehow. Bugs and Sam start a fight on top of the passenger train.

Finally, Sam has Bugs tied up, dangling from a rope, weighted down by an anvil, and fiendishly cutting through the rope, while the train is passing over a gorge. ("Now, ya lop-eared polecat, try and get out of this one!") The screen fills with the words the narrator (Mel Blanc, in close to his natural voice) is saying, "Is this the end of Bugs Bunny? Will our hero be dashed to bits on the jagged rocks below?" and so on. Then Bugs walks across the screen, dressed in top hat and tails, carrying a bag full of gold (reward money), and dragging the now tied-up Sam behind him, mocking the on-screen words ("Is he to be doomed to utter destruction? Will he be rendered non compos mentis?"). Bugs closes by turning to the audience and repeating a popular radio catch-phrase from Red Skelton's "Mean Widdle Kid": "He don't know me vewy well, do he?" as a bar of "Kingdom Coming" plays on the track at iris-out.

 

 
AvailabilityEdit

 

 
See alsoEdit

 

 
NotesEdit
  • The engines on both trains are 4-4-0s or American type locomotives, which were the most common wheel arrangements for locomotives, during the 1800s on American railroads, despite the engine being a 2-4-0, converted to a 2-4-0.
  • "Hare Trigger" contains the first appearance of Yosemite Sam, who would go on to be one of Bugs Bunny's most common rivals, after Elmer Fudd. Freleng created Yosemite Sam because he thought Elmer Fudd was too stupid and soft and he needed a smarter and tougher foe for Bugs. The character was well received and would go on to star in thirty-two more shorts in the Golden Age.
  • This is the first cartoon with the 1945-55 opening rendition of Merrily We Roll Along.
  • This is the first cartoon with full credits.
  • This is also the first Bugs Bunny cartoon with the "Bugs Bunny in" opening.

 

 
External linksEdit
 
 

 

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Wikipedia

 
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17 minutes ago, Michael Stuart Kelly said:

Jon,.

I run OL.

You don't.

Michael

The voices comment was warm, light humor, Michael.

It is how this latest battle with Peter started.

I was making what I think are important posts about important world events when Peter said it was about the voices in my head. I didn’t like that, and neither do most people. It is not humor, as you can now attest.

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3 minutes ago, Jon Letendre said:

I was making what I think are important posts about important world events when Peter said it was about the voices in my head. I didn’t like that, and neither do most people. It’s not humor, as you just now experienced.

Jon,

Horseshit.

I'm not defending Peter's comment as anything productive, but, even if interpreted in your manner, it is a tiny little thing. You made it a declaration of war.

And now you want to go around proving you are right.

There are bad guys out there for real--that is the important stuff--yet you want to spend all your time--and all our time--on this bullshit.

And then you tell me to get a life as "warm humor" in a super-clunky way to prove that only you know what humor is and that Peter's humor does not exist, but if it does, it's evil. And you're the virtuous one. So you will set the rules of how we act and teach everyone why.

This is all just pure bullshit.

Michael

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29 minutes ago, Jon Letendre said:

Why did you just now have a negative reaction to this post, Billy?

I was just keeping it light with Tony, with some warm humor.

Was it because you recognize that the language I used on Tony, the same Peter uses on me and passive-aggressively claims is light warm humor, is actually toxic language?

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5 minutes ago, Michael Stuart Kelly said:

Jon,

Horseshit.

I'm not defending Peter's comment as anything productive, but, even if interpreted in your manner, it is a tiny little thing. You made it a declaration of war.

And now you want to go around proving you are right.

There are bad guys out there for real--that is the important stuff--yet you want to spend all your time--and all our time--on this bullshit.

And then you tell me to get a life as "warm humor" in a super-clunky way to prove that only you know what humor is and that Peter's humor does not exist, but if it does, it's evil. And you're the virtuous one. So you will set the rules of how we act and teach everyone why.

This is all just pure bullshit.

Michael

No, I don’t want to own humor, I just want people who have a lot to say about our dispute to experience the language Peter uses on me and see how it feels. Thanks for participating.

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I agree Michael.  One other point about being civil. A person may involuntarily cuss "in person" when that is normal group speak. You can't go back and edit "What the "F"" to your Army buddies. But when writing you can edit yourself before sending. To claim otherwise, is not logical.

When I engage anyone in conversation online and it is not a personal message, I look at the "Activity" list for guidance. That is when I engage or not. If a person had no activity I would not engage. That is not stalking.  

On another list Azrael Rand wrote: Let me ask this question? If Ayn Rand were alive today and was able to keep up with the scientific discoveries of the day as well as current events do you believe she would have amended her philosophy to be consistent with its original premise based on the feedback given to her by reality or do you believe she would have stayed the course even up until today. I choose to believe in the former which is one of the reasons I believe in the concept of Open Objectivism. end quote

What would Ayn Rand think of someone cussing, accusing, name calling, and being uncivil? I don't need to answer because it is obvious.

Another line of thinking about that quote may be the subject of another thread. If she were still alive and writing, what would Rand change or expand upon? Peter 

 

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If a person cusses or bullies in writing, what is the possibility that that is how they act in their personal life? That sounds harsh and a bit too personal but not if someone claims they have no control over their actions. Involuntary and volitional contradict each other. Peter

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2 minutes ago, Peter said:

If a person cusses or bullies in writing, what is the possibility that that is how they act in their personal life? That sounds harsh and a bit too personal but not if someone claims they have no control over their actions. Involuntary and volitional contradict each other. Peter

You don’t get my jokes and you attack  me. That’s all you seem able to do. You misinterpret my cussing manner of laughing at all your great jokes and you attack, attack, attack.

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On 6/20/2019 at 2:47 PM, Peter said:

CIA black op sites in Iran? Did Natural News tell you that or did "the voices" inform you?

I propose a do-over.

The above post made me very angry. In my response I told peter he was a mass-media brainwashed idiot, and I also said he had a feeble brain.

In the do-over, I will not take him for attacking me, but just making light humor.

I will respond with light humor, and no cussing, because it is cussing that can ruin good, light humor. Here we go:

Who talked you out of the unavoidable truth that the CIA has always had undeclared sites in every country? Was it your sister, while the two of you were making sweet, sweet love?

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35 minutes ago, Michael Stuart Kelly said:

Although the humor thing I gave above is correct, Mark Leary gave me a frame for much of the bullshit that happens on forums and in social media.

This is a note to myself.

There is a book I found extremely enlightening (for my fiction writing), but I was always confused about one point. The book is called Why We Snap: Understanding the Rage Circuit in Your Brain by Douglas Fields. There's a lot of technical stuff, but the innate part of our rage circuits start at specific neurons on the hippocampus. They've even done experiments on rats where they drill a hole in a rat's head, insert a fiber optic thread that ends on a specific neuron, say, one that makes the rat become blind with rage, then send pulses that trigger the neuron. They can then turn the rage on and off instantly with a switch. Switch it on, the rat goes apeshit. Switch it off, the rat instantly calms down.

Fields identified 9 neural circuits that prompt a person to snap. But instead of fiber optic threads, the trigger happens by built up pressure. Over time, with enough pressure, this finally triggers the circuit to overpower the rest of the brain and the person will engage in something physical, usually bad, and it will be automatic. (But sometimes a good action can follow, like when a person immediately jumps in a river to save a drowning person, then doesn't remember jumping in.)

He used an acronym for the nine circuits.

L = Life and limb
I = Insult
F = Family and friends
E = Environment (territory)
M = Mate
O = Order (rules of society)
R = Resources (food and shelter)
T = Tribe
S = Stopped (stuck)

For fiction writing, if you apply pressure to one or more of these circuits on a character in a story and keep piling it on, there will come a natural climax where the character will erupt. That's been my focus. (Paddy Chayefsky, the screenwriter for Network, basically said this was his goal of writing, without the neuroscience, of course.)

But I was always confused about O (order, rules of society). Mark Leary's explanation finally made it make sense to me. There is no such thing as society innately in the brain, but there is an innate neural groove where how to deal with other members of the species can develop through learned behavior. Note, this is not learned behavior on a blank slate, the way Rand says. It is learned behavior within a neural template, a groove, a premade form of sorts.

I was so impressed with Leary's video above, I got his two "Great Courses" on human nature at Audible. (I have a subscription where I get one credit a month. They ran a sale where I can get two audiobooks for one credit and, by chance, they were offering the audio of these two courses. So I snapped them up.)

Anyway, this is a note to myself and information for anyone else interested. I will probably copy it over in the writing section since it has nothing to do with Iran.

:) 

Michael

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6 minutes ago, Jon Letendre said:

I propose a do-over.

The above post made me very angry. In my response I told peter he was a mass-media brainwashed idiot, and I also said he had a feeble brain.

In the do-over, I will not take him for attacking me, but just making light humor.

I will respond with light humor. Here we go:

Who talked you out of the unavoidable truth that the CIA has always had undeclared sites in every country? Was it your sister, while the two of you were making sweet, sweet love?

That should get you a reprimand, but why bring up your sister? Now that is GI humor. You mentioned having a family. Is this how you treat them?

This encounter clearly illustrates the difference between objective banter, argumentation, and what is clearly a destructive personal attack.  

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Transference  [trans-fer´ens] in psychiatry, the unconscious tendency of a patient to assign to others in the present environment feelings and attitudes associated with significant persons in one's earlier life; especially, the patient's transfer to the therapist of feelings and attitudes associated with a parent or similar person from childhood. The feelings may be affectionate (positive transference), hostile (negative transference), or ambivalent. Sometimes the transference can be interpreted to help the patient understand childhood attitudes. end quote

A person who transfers their personal feelings into an attack on another person, attributing what they are ashamed of, to that other person, is not a good characteristic and should not be condoned. Take each instance of name calling or slander and wonder, “Is that what they are really like?” Perhaps, Ellen Stuttle may be one person with an opinion on this, but anyone, please feel free to contribute. Peter     

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22 minutes ago, Peter said:

That should get you a reprimand, but why bring up your sister? Now that is GI humor. You mentioned having a family. Is this how you treat them?

This encounter clearly illustrates the difference between objective banter, argumentation, and what is clearly a destructive personal attack.  

I should have known better, I didn’t anticipate that you would execute some of that unassailable GI humor of switching it to my sister. I underestimated your genius again, Peter!

You are not being fair at all. That is a humorous, cuss-word-free response to your original offending post of voices in my head. Yet you reject it also. There’s no satisfying you. Ellen is right, you are a whiner.

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6 minutes ago, Peter said:

Transference  [trans-fer´ens] in psychiatry, the unconscious tendency of a patient to assign to others in the present environment feelings and attitudes associated with significant persons in one's earlier life; especially, the patient's transfer to the therapist of feelings and attitudes associated with a parent or similar person from childhood. The feelings may be affectionate (positive transference), hostile (negative transference), or ambivalent. Sometimes the transference can be interpreted to help the patient understand childhood attitudes. end quote

 

A person who transfers their personal feelings into an attack on another person, attributing what they are ashamed of, to that other person, is not a good characteristic and should not be condoned. Take each instance of name calling or slander and wonder, “Is that what they are really like?” Perhaps, Ellen Stuttle may be one person with an opinion on this, but anyone, please feel free to contribute. Peter     

 

Attack, attack, attack.

And in the process, he exposes his true meaning of “voices in your head,” used against me three days ago. It wasn’t humor.

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