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Country and Atonal

Rodney posted this video on Facebook.

I posted this over there (and I hardly ever post on Facebook anymore:

Quote

This was like Alexander the Great chopping through the Gordian knot of my lifelong cognitive dissonance that started in my college days.

That I have lived to see and hear this... ahhh... life is good... :) 

If I had heard this song decades earlier, my life might have gone in a different direction.

Merle Hazard described my music composition teachers and the avant garde culture at Boston University perfectly.

At least I now get to laugh...

:) 

And that banjo riff... the John Cage silence...

LOL... :) 

Michael

 

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7 hours ago, Michael Stuart Kelly said:

If I had heard this song decades earlier, my life might have gone in a different direction.

 

Which direction would that have been?

Not sold on extended atonality?  Find it too hard to extract the ear-worm of Stravinsky's uber-catchy adaptation of The Owl and the Pussycat?

Nothing tops the "beautiful Pussy" part for getting unintended laughs from a college recital audience.

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Dennis,

You bring up bad memories.

:) 

btw - In my composing days, I sketched out a companion piece for Stravinsky's L'Histoire du Soldat, which, thank God, was before his atonal phase. The reason I wanted to do this was because the instrumentation of Stravinsky's piece was so odd that nothing else was written for it. So I wanted to use the same ensemble.

(I played that thing a number of time since trombone was one of the instruments. That's how I got interested in it.)

I was full of Rand at the time, so, for the story, I chose a short story by O. Henry called "The Cop and the Anthem." I called my piece Soapy after the protagonist.

The story is about a bum named Soapy who wanted to go to jail for the winter. Cold was coming on and in jail it was warm with guaranteed meals. He tried everything he could to get arrested, but couldn't for the life of him. After the last attempt, he freaked and ran and ran and ran until he had to stop from exhaustion. It was outside a church. As he heard the music coming from the church, he started musing over how he had wasted his life. He decided to clean himself up, get a job, and make something out of himself. No sooner had he come to that decision, a cop came along, arrested him for vagrancy and threw him in jail for the winter.

In my piece, there were no words or singing. Essentially the actors would mime of the different situations. However, there was a ballerina always dancing around Soapy like a fairy or an angel, reflecting his moods and inner resolves. My idea was to make the setting realistic and the ballerina other-worldly. Soapy would only dance once--with the ballerina. It would be during church anthem and it would be uplifting, going to a nice climax. After the officer arrests Soapy at the end, the ballerina would follow them downtrodden, no longer dancing.

I never finished this. I intend to still write music at some point in my life, so I just might do this piece. Except I don't want to ally it anymore to L'Histoire. which, truth be told, kinda sucks. :) So the ensemble will probably be a lot different. String orchestra would do just fine, or maybe something else. Maybe even a light pop music angle...

I'm going to think on this...

Michael

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3 hours ago, Michael Stuart Kelly said:

Soapy would only dance once--with the ballerina. It would be during church anthem and it would be uplifting, going to a nice climax.

Recall that Rand wanted to see a hybrid of ballet and tap dancing.  The trouble being that different shoes are needed (I think).  How about having Soapy tap dance? 

And make sure the arresting officer looks like Kant.  Then you'll have a shot at getting it premiered at OCON. 

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5 minutes ago, 9thdoctor said:

Recall that Rand wanted to see a hybrid of ballet and tap dancing.  The trouble being that different shoes are needed (I think).  How about having Soapy tap dance? 

And make sure the arresting officer looks like Kant.  Then you'll have a shot at getting it premiered at OCON. 

She said Fred Astaire mixed them up. I think it was tap with elements of ballet. I'm not sure what she wanted. Don't recall that.

--Brant

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3 hours ago, Michael Stuart Kelly said:

You bring up bad memories.

While we're doing music humor and bringing up bad memories for you, there's a channel on YouTube that's all about combining wildly different songs and old time music videos with hilarious results.  The first one is selected to keep those bad memories flowing, plus the dancing might be something Soapyish. 

The second one is rather more clever, musically speaking.  The whole thing calls to mind Charles Ives.  Like the end of the 2nd Symphony, when Columbia, the Gem of the Ocean gets mashed up with Camptown Races.

There are a bunch more of these, some great, some just ok.  Worth checking out. 

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Ear worms? This song is tonal and well sung but the lyrics? The most critical and scathing song lyrics ever written, tada. Peter

Big Shot" by Billy Joel
Well you went uptown riding in your limousine
With your fine Park Avenue clothes
You had the Dom Perignon in your hand
And the spoon up your nose
And when you wake up in the morning
With your head on fire
And your eyes too bloody to see
Go on and cry in your coffee
But don't come bitchin' to me

Because you had to be a big shot, didn't you
You had to open up your mouth
You had to be a big shot, didn't you
All your friends were so knocked out
You had to have the last word, last night
You know what everything's about
You had to have a white hot spotlight
You had to be a big shot last night

They were all impressed with your Halston dress
And the people that you knew at Elaine's
And the story of your latest success
Kept 'em so entertained
Aw but now you just don't remember
All the things you said
And you're not sure you want to know
I'll give you one hint, honey
You sure did put on a show

Yes, yes, you had to be a big shot, didn't you
You had to prove it to the crowd
You had to be a big shot, didn't you
All your friends were so knocked out
You had to have the last word, last night
You're so much fun to be around
You had to have the front page, bold type
You had to be a big shot last night

Well, it's no big sin to stick your two cents in
If you know when to leave it alone
But you went over the line
You couldn't see it was time to go home
No, no, no, no, no, no, you had to be a big shot, didn't you
You had to open up your mouth
You had to be a big shot, didn't you
All your friends were so knocked out
You had to have the last word, last night
So much fun to be around
You had to have a white hot spot light
You had to be a big shot last night

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Another “ear worm?” I have told this story before but . . . I was out of the army in 1969 and walking by Janice Joplin’s San Francisco residence with a disc jockey friend George Feist, (pronounced Feast), when he said, “Go push her button. If she likes your looks she might let us in.” I just couldn’t do it, but I remember being thrilled at the thought.  

Emma Franklin, elder sister of Aretha recorded “Take Another Little Piece of My Heart,” in 1967, a year and a tear, before Janice Joplin in 1968. I watched Emma’s version from around 1993 and it is only a little different from the Joplin mega hit and frequently in a good way.  How can lyrics so simple, (and almost violent singing) touch us in such a profound way? Is she talking about her loving heart or her loving  . . . . Peter

Oh, come on, come on, come on, come on!

Didn't I make you feel like you were the only man yeah!
Didn't I give you nearly everything that a woman possibly can?
Honey, you know I did!
And each time I tell myself that I, well I think I've had enough
But I'm gonna show you, baby, that a woman can be tough.

I want you to come on, come on, come on, come on and take it
Take it!
Take another little piece of my heart now, baby!
Oh, oh, break it!
Break another little bit of my heart now, darling, yeah, yeah, yeah.
Oh, oh, have a!
Have another little piece of my heart now, baby . . . .

Piece of My Heart,” by Jerry Ragovoy and Bert Berns originally recorded by Emma Franklin in 1967. 

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* Erma.

Anyway, I love both Erma and Janis's versions -- quite a contrast of how two different artists handled the same piece.

J

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7 hours ago, Peter said:

Another “ear worm?” I have told this story before but . . . I was out of the army in 1969 and walking by Janice Joplin’s San Francisco residence with a disc jockey friend George Feist, (pronounced Feast), when he said, “Go push her button. If she likes your looks she might let us in.” I just couldn’t do it, but I remember being thrilled at the thought.  

 

Emma Franklin, elder sister of Aretha recorded “Take Another Little Piece of My Heart,” in 1967, a year and a tear, before Janice Joplin in 1968. I watched Emma’s version from around 1993 and it is only a little different from the Joplin mega hit and frequently in a good way.  How can lyrics so simple, (and almost violent singing) touch us in such a profound way? Is she talking about her loving heart or her loving  . . . . Peter

 

Oh, come on, come on, come on, come on!

 

Didn't I make you feel like you were the only man yeah!
Didn't I give you nearly everything that a woman possibly can?
Honey, you know I did!
And each time I tell myself that I, well I think I've had enough
But I'm gonna show you, baby, that a woman can be tough.

 

I want you to come on, come on, come on, come on and take it
Take it!
Take another little piece of my heart now, baby!
Oh, oh, break it!
Break another little bit of my heart now, darling, yeah, yeah, yeah.
Oh, oh, have a!
Have another little piece of my heart now, baby . . . .

 

Piece of My Heart,” by Jerry Ragovoy and Bert Berns originally recorded by Emma Franklin in 1967. 

She was so underappreciated.

Even those who appreciate her do not spell her name right! She chose to be Janis.

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10 hours ago, caroljane said:

She was so underappreciated.

Even those who appreciate her do not spell her name right! She chose to be Janis.

 

Damned Autoincorrect.

J

 

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There is one song Janis Joplin sang that I never resonated with. She used to sing "Summertime" by George Gershwin from the opera Porgy and Bess

The thing is, that song is a lullaby. I never could get the image out of my mind of Janis holding an infant in her arms and screeching into the poor baby's face to get it to go to sleep.

:) 

Janis was definitely not good lullaby material from the baby's perspective. I would hate to see what she wanted to put in the baby's formula...

:) 

Michael

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3 hours ago, Jonathan said:

Whiskey and herion. Not good for da baby.

J

Last night on the PBS and BBC show "Victoria" the German Aunt is left to care for the six kids while Vicky and Albert travel to Ireland. The Aunt gives the two oldest kids who I would guess are 10 and 12 a glass of wine with their breakfast.   

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If you ever need some good pick me up music, the scores from movies are always good for a lift. Here are some of my favorites. Go ahead and listen to a few that you might remember on You Tube etc., or just do a search for them all Peter

My current favorites are in this first paragraph but it is subject to change. The Phantom of the Opera, The Music of the Night, All I Ask of You, Wishing You Were Somehow Here Again, The Titanic theme, My Heart Will Go On, by Celine Dion It Must Have Been Love from “Pretty Woman”, by Roxette

Doctor No, You Only Live Twice, and Goldfinger from the James Bond franchise

Superman 1978, Shaft by Isaac Hayes, Ghost Busters, Chariots of Fire by Vangelis, Rocky, Jurassic Park, The Pink Panther, The Way We Were by Barbra Streisand

Night Fever, How Deep Is Your Love, and Stayin’ Alive from Saturday Night Fever, Harry Potter and The Philosopher’s Stone, Top Gun,

The Wind Beneath My Wings from “Beaches” by Bette Midler, Saint Elmo’s Fire, 9 to 5 by Dolly Parton, Footloose, Arthur’s Theme (best that you can do)

The Power of Love by Huey Lewis and the News from the movie from “Back to the Future”, Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head from "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" "I Will Always Love You" 1992's soundtrack for "The Bodyguard"

"The Theme From 'A Summer Place'" - Percy Faith And His Orchestra, "Endless Love" by Diana ross and Lionel Richie, "You Light Up My Life", Don’t Fence Me In.

And back a bit further in time. The Pink Panther theme, The High and the Mighty, Exodus, The Bridge on the River Kwai March song. Yup. It’s a bunch of guys just whistling.  

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