BaalChatzaf

The kilogram has been redefined

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The kilogram is a mass standard.  Since the late 19th century it was defined as something that balances a standard kilogram, a platinum-iridium metal mass kept under lock and key in Paris.  The standard K  is also kept in a nest of bell-jars to prevent dust and particles in the air from settling on the weight.  

The new kilogram standard is defined in terms of Planck's Constant  used in conjunction current in an electrical  weighing device.  In short, the standard of mass is now defined solely in terms of physical constants.

Please see https://www.nist.gov/si-redefinition/kilogram-kibble-balance  for the details. 

 

See also https://www.nist.gov/si-redefinition/kilogram-kibble-balance  for details on the special scale (Kibble Balance)  used to iimplement the new standard and weight against it.

 

 

L.L.A.P \\//

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THE standard Kilogram? In Paris? Shouldn't they keep that in Antarctica? No ladies or "chubby guys" want to know their weight in kilograms. Now kilos works for the fashion conscious. Yup Bubba. I'm down to 100, uh I mean 70 kilos since muh wife put me on a diet. If I don't fit into last years pants she gets all oriental on me and says things like, "No cookie. No nookie." 

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19 hours ago, Peter said:

THE standard Kilogram? In Paris? Shouldn't they keep that in Antarctica? No ladies or "chubby guys" want to know their weight in kilograms. Now kilos works for the fashion conscious. Yup Bubba. I'm down to 100, uh I mean 70 kilos since muh wife put me on a diet. If I don't fit into last years pants she gets all oriental on me and says things like, "No cookie. No nookie." 

Yes Paris.  France is the nation which originated the metric system. Thomas Jefferson wanted to adopt the metric system for the U.S.  but his pro-French leanings  annoyed Congress and the system was not adopted.  

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15 hours ago, BaalChatzaf said:

Yes Paris.  France is the nation which originated the metric system. Thomas Jefferson wanted to adopt the metric system for the U.S.  but his pro-French leanings  annoyed Congress and the system was not adopted.  

Thank God, and 8 pound 2 oz baby Jesus.

The metric system is less conducive to creativity than the imperial system. 10 works great for the observation mindset of science techies, but 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, etc., works better for creators.

J

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2 hours ago, Jonathan said:

Thank God, and 8 pound 2 oz baby Jesus.

The metric system is less conducive to creativity than the imperial system. 10 works great for the observation mindset of science techies, but 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, etc., works better for creators.

J

Nonsense.  Physical science has not suffered one bit from its exclusive use of the metric system.  The good part about the metric system as that measurements among like attributes (mass, length, time etc) the different quantities are related by powers of 10.  This is not the case with the British System which is the system for non scientific  applications used in the United States.  We still measure our distances  in inches, feet, yards and miles and the quantities have no simple interconvertability.  One must remember 12 inches to the feet,  3 feet to they year 1760 yards to the mile etc. Likewise for ounces of weight), pounds, tons.  It is a mess, but we can manage it.  The only time the issue of measurement really mattered was in a Mars probe where the American engineers  used the British system and the parts made in Europe were metric.  The probe failed miserably and it cost  millions of dollars to place a bundle of scrap on Mars.

 

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8 minutes ago, BaalChatzaf said:

Nonsense.  Physical science has not suffered one bit from its exclusive use of the metric system.  The good part about the metric system as that measurements among like attributes (mass, length, time etc) the different quantities are related by powers of 10.  This is not the case with the British System which is the system for non scientific  applications used in the United States.  We still measure our distances  in inches, feet, yards and miles and the quantities have no simple interconvertability.  One must remember 12 inches to the feet,  3 feet to they year 1760 yards to the mile etc. Likewise for ounces of weight), pounds, tons.  It is a mess, but we can manage it.  The only time the issue of measurement really mattered was in a Mars probe where the American engineers  used the British system and the parts made in Europe were metric.  The probe failed miserably and it cost  millions of dollars to place a bundle of scrap on Mars.

 

Yeah, you didn't read and comprehend what I wrote, did you? Heh. Not at all. None of it.

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On 11/20/2018 at 1:46 PM, Jonathan said:

Yeah, you didn't read and comprehend what I wrote, did you? Heh. Not at all. None of it.

Yes I did. Some of the most creative people who ever lived did physics and they used the metric system.  The English system does  not work based on powers of 2.  However binary arithmetic does and the computer folks do well with powers of two.  

 

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