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9 hours ago, Michael Stuart Kelly said:

Samantha Bee is mediocre and one-dimensional hack (thus not very funny outside of a small political niche audience), but now advertisers are pulling out from her show because she said one more vile filthy comment about a politician. This isn't the first time, fer goddsake.

I am against the advertisers doing this just as much as I am against what the suits did to Roseanne for trashing a politician.

When backroom folks tie advertising on comedy shows to obeying Big Brother on political discourse, we open the door to a new kind of crony corporatism. And comedy gets closer to the end point of death by a thousand cuts. (American mainstream comedians are already not funny anymore.)

If anyone thinks this is a good idea, and you don't mind extinguishing laughter from our culture because you are politically outraged, it sucks to be you.

Seriously. You need to get laid or something.

Michael

Well, I think the essence of good comedy is in presenting the reality of people and situations and our behaviors and attitudes, in such an original way, that it strikes the funny bone through its truthfulness. In other words, there is something objective -and serious- underlying good humor. e.g. George Carlin, and many others. We've had generations of distorting spin-offs from that standard until we arrive at the point comedy is empty of standards: nothing matters. Isn't that hilarious? Self-irony, or superior and snide giggling at anything or anyone which could be considered 'good' in the least, is now considered cool. And also the general fare we get from films is a mixing of contradicting genres: romantic comedy, ("romcoms" which are often sentimentalist and unfunny) horror comedy, zombie comedy, apocalypse comedy, etc., While from "reality comedy" shows, comes nasty political satire (polcom?) - or some 'standup comic' expressing on stage, to uneasy laughter, the subjective emanations of his/her little mind and shallow feelings (emocom?). 

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Getting back to Roseanne, I just heard part of a video where Rush Limbaugh said the reason the mainstream media was so gleeful about ABC cancelling Roseanne, even while losing about $50-60 million in ad revenue was that this is exactly what the left dreams of doing to President Trump. (This is my paraphrase, obviously.)

They wake up every day certain that this is the day they finally get the Trump Tweet or gaffe that will take him down. One where he will go too far. They dream of this so hard they can't stand it. So when something like the Roseanne case comes along, they go batshit crazy in a feeding frenzy

Roseanne was simply a stand-in for President Trump in their grubby little deluded souls.

:)

Michael

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4 hours ago, anthony said:

Well, I think the essence of good comedy is in presenting the reality of people and situations and our behaviors and attitudes, in such an original way, that it strikes the funny bone through its truthfulness. In other words, there is something objective -and serious- underlying good humor. e.g. George Carlin, and many others. We've had generations of distorting spin-offs from that standard until we arrive at the point comedy is empty of standards: nothing matters. Isn't that hilarious? Self-irony, or superior and snide giggling at anything or anyone which could be considered 'good' in the least, is now considered cool. And also the general fare we get from films is a mixing of contradicting genres: romantic comedy, ("romcoms" which are often sentimentalist and unfunny) horror comedy, zombie comedy, apocalypse comedy, etc., While from "reality comedy" shows, comes nasty political satire (polcom?) - or some 'standup comic' expressing on stage, to uneasy laughter, the subjective emanations of his/her little mind and shallow feelings (emocom?). 

And it is funny if the protagonists are not very nice people, like on "Seinfeld," and the newer show, "MOM' who is played by ?Alison Janney? It's funny to see them get the skewer. So many "Seinfeld" episodes ended with them getting their Just Desserts.  

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1 hour ago, Peter said:

And it is funny if the protagonists are not very nice people, like on "Seinfeld," and the newer show, "MOM' who is played by ?Alison Janney? It's funny to see them get the skewer. So many "Seinfeld" episodes ended with them getting their Just Desserts.  

I haven't seen Mom. Coincidentally, recently been watching the entire Seinfeld series, and must disagree with not very nice people, although mostly they do receive their just desserts, i.e. not escaping reality, but not cruelly. The character Jerry is actually a decent and thoughtful guy who is often put into tricky situations by his friends' shenanigans and insecurities. There again, is that element of truth about people underneath the funny. Seinfeld humor is smart and gentle, not crossing the line into 'sophisticated', postmodern self-irony and cynicism. The really good humorists had that knack, too many now think they have to be nasty, slick and dark to impress. You seen "Barry" - a newish dark humor series about some depressed hitman, wannabe L.A. actor? - boring, once you know its plot-premise. Bloody violence and laughter are an unappetizing mixture. Before black humor became formulaic, I liked some, such as the movie Fargo. (And I really liked Two and a Half Men (the first series with Charley, only!), but can't enjoy the snideness of Big Bang Theory - for me -- "not very nice people").

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You've convinced me to reevaluate my "Seinfeld" theories. "Two and a Half Men" is great to watch even in reruns. I think the key to rooting for naughty, flawed characters is that they are mostly good. You need to wince when the door gets slammed in their face.

"The Big Bang Theory" has a spinoff called "Young Shelden" and it is very good. He is an 8 year old going to high school, who corrects the teachers when they are wrong. He is always truthful, and will instantly tell someone they look bad in those clothes. The "naughty character" is his grandmother, played by Annie Potts. In that part of Texas they call a grandmother, a "meemaw."   

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Never-Trumper writer and GOP ad-man Rick Wilson unleashes his heady humour on Roseanne ...

rickWilsonRoseanneSeason2reboot.png

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What a joy to listen to Roseanne now that the dust has settled.

 

She thinks there is going to be a paradigm shift in Hollywood after some of the elites who created the anti-Trump hoaxes land in jail. And she says that with a lot of pent up satisfaction. I think she's right and I hope she enjoys every moment of schadenfreude that emerges in her soul when it happens.

I loved her comment to Lionel when he asked her about the Democrat candidates as he rattled of the twenty-something names. He asked her what they had in common, what was their common platform for the Democratic party...

Immediately and without blinking she said: "We hate Jews who love Israel."

Dayaamm!

Boy, did that nail it.

:) 

Every goddam one of those candidates show signs of that.

She has even eschewed the term socialism. She said what they are doing now in the culture has nothing to do with what she meant before by that word, which was basically not letting anyone go hungry and live in the streets of America.

(My comment: Back when she was touting her working class leftism, you could hardly find any people like that. Now they are common in America's cities. Thanks Obama & Co.)

She said President Trump is doing a lot of what she wanted done.

One last one. When she was in a wheelchair, she said they would not let her smoke in some building or other, not even with the window open. Lots of tut-tut-tutting about their morally superior position. But when she went out on the street, she had to navigate around human feces. :) 

Michael

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I shall put this here, since she has been on TV. Doris Day was 97 when she died today and the following is to celebrate her life.

 

“The Dash Poem” by Linda Ellis

I read of a man who stood to speak

At the funeral of a friend

He referred to the dates on her tombstone

From the beginning to the end.

He noted that first came the date of her birth

And spoke of the following date with tears,

but he said what mattered most of all

was the dash between those years.

For that dash represents all the time

That she spent alive on earth

And now only those who loved her

Know what that life is worth.

For it matters not, how much we own,

The cars, the house, the cash,

What matters is how much we live and love

And how we spend our dash.

So think about this long and hard;

Are there things you’d like to change?

For you never know how much time is left

That can still be rearranged.

If we could just slow down enough

To consider what’s true and real

And always try to understand

The way other people feel.

And be less quick to anger

And show appreciation more

And love the people in our lives

Like we’ve never loved before.

If we treat each other with respect

And more often wear a smile,

Remembering that this special dash

Might only last a little while.

So when your eulogy is being read

With your life’s actions to rehash

Would you be proud of the things they say

About how you spent your dash?

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What is the funniest Seinfeld episode? Though I usually don't like Kramer, but in the following episode synopsis I think Kramer was at his best. Peter

Jimmy, played by Anthony Starke, is the title character in “The Jimmy”. He always talks about himself in the third person. He then gets George to talk about himself in the third person. He hurts himself and pledges revenge on Kramer, later attacking him at a benefit featuring Mel Tormé. He said, “Jimmy’s gonna get you, Kramer! Jimmy holds grudges!”

From Wikipedia. Jerry, George and Kramer finish playing a game of basketball with Jimmy (Anthony Starke), a man who always refers to himself in the third person. Jimmy is wearing special training shoes which supposedly improve vertical leap, and George wants a pair so they can be matching twins. George says he shouldn't have exercised because, even though he took a shower, it doesn't work. Jerry and Kramer are scheduled to see Dr. Tim Whatley, the dentist ("The Mom & Pop Store").

At the New York Yankees meeting Mr. Wilhelm informs George that there have been a series of escalating burglaries of shoes and batting "donuts" and that he thinks it's an "inside job." Meanwhile, George is sweating heavily as a result of exercising, causing him to look suspicious. While Jerry waits to see Tim Whatley, he realizes there are Penthouse magazines in the waiting room.

Back at the apartment, Elaine has tickets to a benefit for the Able Mentally Challenged Adults (AMCA) featuring famous crooner Mel Tormé (The Velvet Fog). Elaine also says she wants to meet a handsome blond guy from the health club, but Jerry and George claim to have no idea who she is talking about because they "can't find beauty in a man". Jerry is disgusted about the magazines he found in Whatley's dental office, although he did take a peek. Kramer on the other hand can't wait for his appointment. George says he and Jimmy will make good money by selling the special shoes. Kramer tastes some Kung Pao chicken and finds it too spicy.

At the health club Elaine tries to get the attention of the blond man but ends up talking with Jimmy, mistaking his own declarations of interest in her for that of the blonde man because of Jimmy's peculiar way of talking about himself in the third person. Elaine thus agrees to a date with Jimmy.

Kramer visits Tim Whatley's office. Later at the health club, because of the Novocaine, Kramer is drooling water all over the floor and speaking awkwardly. Kramer tells Jerry that Whatley has a new "adults-only policy" for his office. Then, because of the puddle of water, Jimmy slips while demonstrating some "rustling positions", severely injures his leg and promises revenge.

On the street, Kramer is still wearing the silly-looking training shoes and, still suffering from the effects of the Novocaine, is mistaken for an "Able Mentally Challenged Adult". Kramer shares a taxicab with an executive at the AMCA, who mistakes his Novocaine-induced condition, paired with his problems entering the cab due to the shoes, for that of an AMCA and invites him to the event.

Without Jimmy, George fails to demonstrate the value of the training shoes to employees at a sneaker store, as his vertical leap is embarrassingly short. At the apartment, Kramer says he is invited to the benefit as the guest of honor; Jerry and Elaine realize the confusion because of the Novocaine and the shoes, although they admit to each that it's debatable as to whether or not Kramer is in fact "mentally challenged."

At a second appointment with Dr. Whatley, Jerry is put to sleep with nitrous oxide. Jerry notices that his regular assistant Jennifer has been replaced by Cheryl (Alison Armitage); Whatley, with a knowing grin, tells Jerry she's at Dr. Sussman's office because "we find it fun to swap now and then." George eats Kung Pao chicken for lunch and is again sweating when individually questioned by Mr. Wilhelm about the stolen goods—who has walked in while George is on the phone with Sports Wholesalers talking about lots of shoes... "beautiful athletic gear." Wilhelm accuses George of being a terrible liar, thinking the sweat is an unmistakable indication of guilt. George, in response, replies in the third person: "George likes his chicken spicy."

When Jerry wakes up he has blurred vision but sees Whatley and his nurse putting their clothes back on. At Monk's, Jerry discusses with Elaine that he fears he may have been violated while asleep. Elaine says she has a date with Jimmy; after Jerry's description of his way of talking she realizes she is going with the wrong guy. George enters, talking again in the third person saying he must answer to the team owner, George Steinbrenner for the stolen equipment.

Elaine meets Jimmy again at the health club to tell him there's been a "little misunderstanding", to which Jimmy replies "Jimmy and misunderstandings kinda clash". She learns that Hank, the man she liked, is gay, begins to find Jimmy's manner of speech interesting, and decides to keep the date, declaring that she once tried to "convert" a gay man ("The Beard") but will not try that again. At the benefit, Kramer is no longer under the effect of drugs. However, Jimmy arrives and starts fighting with him, slugging him in the face before being dragged out by security, all the while yelling "Jimmy's gonna get you, Kramer! Hands off Jimmy! DON'T TOUCH JIMMY!"; Kramer's lip becomes swollen and he once again looks and speaks as if he is mentally challenged. While facing Steinbrenner, George starts talking in the third person; this confuses Steinbrenner who ends up talking about his lunch and completely forgetting about the stolen equipment. At the benefit, Mel Tormé dedicates his signature song, "When You're Smiling", to a beaming Kramer.

In the credits scene, Kramer picks up a copy of Penthouse Magazine and reads a letter from an unnamed dentist, who apparently recently had a little fun with his dental hygienist and one of his patients. Jerry looks on in horror and is assumed to be the victim of sexual assault. 

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