Conspiracy theories and Conspiracy theorists


KorbenDallas

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4 hours ago, Jon Letendre said:

That’s a fine institution you have there. Be a shame if someone came along and bankrupted it. Billion, B. Will he get that? No. But this is only one student. Wait for the class–actions and criminal judgements.

Another lawsuit filed by Joshua Toy and his mother said he was denied college admission despite a 4.2 grade point average, and seeks $500 billion of damages from 45 defendants for defrauding and inflicting emotional distress on everyone whose “rights to a fair chance” to enter college was stolen.”

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-education-cheating-idUSKCN1QV20W

Isn't 4.0 the highest grade average you can accumulate? So who was bribed to get the extra 2 percent? What a shame. Some of the few Hallmark shows I like were with Lori Laughlin. Is that spelling wrong? Now where is that Mensa home test I ordered?   

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4 minutes ago, Peter said:

Isn't 4.0 the highest grade average you can accumulate? So who was bribed to get the extra 2 percent? What a shame. Some of the few Hallmark shows I like were with Lori Laughlin. Is that spelling wrong? Now where is that Mensa home test I ordered?   

I think you misunderstand it, Peter. Joshua has a 4.2 gpa, he didn’t cheat, he is suing those who did cheat.

GPA now  goes higher than it used to. Now, not all straight As are equal.

Say you get an A in a science class, 4.0 grade.

I get more than 4.0 to reflect I got my A in a college–level AP (advanced placement) physics course. My A is bigger, so it counts for more than 4.0

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2 minutes ago, Jon Letendre said:

I think you misunderstand it, Peter. Joshua has a 4.2 gpa, he didn’t cheat, he is suing those who did cheat.

GPA now  goes higher than it used to. Now, not all straight As are equal.

Say you get an A in a science class, 4.0 grade.

I get more than 4.0 to reflect I got my A in a college–level AP (advanced placement) physics course. My A is bigger, so it counts for more than 4.0

Is there a GNC supplement I can take to make it bigger?

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14 minutes ago, Peter said:

Isn't 4.0 the highest grade average you can accumulate? So who was bribed to get the extra 2 percent? What a shame. Some of the few Hallmark shows I like were with Lori Laughlin. Is that spelling wrong? Now where is that Mensa home test I ordered?   

Hallmark dumped her today.

Yale, Stanford, UCLA, it’s quite a large conspiracy. Coaches bought off to fake athletic participation, etc.

These are leftist institutions, so 

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1 minute ago, Jon Letendre said:

Hallmark dumped her today.

Yale, Stanford, UCLA, it’s quite a large conspiracy. Coaches bought off to fake athletic participation, etc.

These are leftist institutions, so 

I'd give Lori a hug if I could. Yet if a rich man walks into Harvardvark or EliYale university and says here's a mill, give my kid a room at the rich kids dorm, it is done and apparently that is legal. 

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1 hour ago, Peter said:

I'd give Lori a hug if I could. Yet if a rich man walks into Harvardvark or EliYale university and says here's a mill, give my kid a room at the rich kids dorm, it is done and apparently that is legal. 

She only obtained her freedom after paying a $1,000,000 bail, so apparently it isn’t all that legal, afterall.

Trump will see to it they get zero federal dollars if they continue suppressing the free speech of those they don’t agree with and zero federal dollars if they won’t be transparent about admissions. Frankly, I hope they resist and get destroyed.

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12 hours ago, Jon Letendre said:

She only obtained her freedom after paying a $1,000,000 bail, so apparently it isn’t all that legal, afterall.

Trump will see to it they get zero federal dollars if they continue suppressing the free speech of those they don’t agree with and zero federal dollars if they won’t be transparent about admissions. Frankly, I hope they resist and get destroyed.

When a private college accepts federal funds, then morally reprehensible but legal private admission policies, become crimes. Public institutions that falsify records and pass them on commit fraud and fall under the same shameful federal and state laws. If the private institution of Hogwarts, or if the public schools of Hoboken give every kid an "A" that is deemed AOK. "No child left behind" is also fraudulent. Go figure.  

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From AP:  Puzzling number of men tied to Ferguson protests have died. FERGUSON, Mo. — Two young men were found dead inside torched cars. Three others died of apparent suicides. Another collapsed on a bus, his death ruled an overdose. Six deaths, all involving men with connections to protests in Ferguson, Missouri, drew attention on social media and speculation in the activist community that something sinister was at play. Police say there is no evidence the deaths have anything to do with the protests stemming from a white police officer's fatal shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown, and that only two were homicides with no known link to the protests. end quote

Here’s a conspiracy theory. Were the suicides, shootings and overdoses tied to Roswell, New Mexico, or to Ferguson, Missouri and the fact that the dearly departed’s demographics show a more likeliness to die mysteriously or violently? I would guess it was aliens. Peter 

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7 hours ago, Peter said:

From AP:  Puzzling number of men tied to Ferguson protests have died. FERGUSON, Mo. — Two young men were found dead inside torched cars. Three others died of apparent suicides. Another collapsed on a bus, his death ruled an overdose. Six deaths, all involving men with connections to protests in Ferguson, Missouri, drew attention on social media and speculation in the activist community that something sinister was at play. Police say there is no evidence the deaths have anything to do with the protests stemming from a white police officer's fatal shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown, and that only two were homicides with no known link to the protests. end quote

 

Here’s a conspiracy theory. Were the suicides, shootings and overdoses tied to Roswell, New Mexico, or to Ferguson, Missouri and the fact that the dearly departed’s demographics show a more likeliness to die mysteriously or violently? I would guess it was aliens. Peter 

Gosh, if they publish lots of similar stories it helps all "conspiracy theories" look extra stupid, doesn't it? Is that their motivation for pretending this is worthy? You don't imagine they think it is worthy, right?

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On 3/15/2019 at 12:35 AM, Jon Letendre said:

She only obtained her freedom after paying a $1,000,000 bail, so apparently it isn’t all that legal, afterall.

Trump will see to it they get zero federal dollars if they continue suppressing the free speech of those they don’t agree with and zero federal dollars if they won’t be transparent about admissions. Frankly, I hope they resist and get destroyed.

Changing grades and activities to gain admission is illegal. Bribing officials is illegal. Giving a school a million to put up the Letendre Library and admit your child who may barely meet the standards set and may have lesser grades than others not admitted, is legal and happening every 60 seconds in April, May, and June for the following school year. Did I say one million? Make that two.   

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33 minutes ago, Jon Letendre said:

Gosh, if they publish lots of similar stories it helps all "conspiracy theories" look extra stupid, doesn't it? Is that their motivation for pretending this is worthy? You don't imagine they think it is worthy, right?

It's worth it dude if you want to spoof the world. Wayne's World. Wayne's World.  

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28 minutes ago, Peter said:

Changing grades and activities to gain admission is illegal. Bribing officials is illegal. Giving a school a million to put up the Letendre Library and admit your child who may barely meet the standards set and may have lesser grades than others not admitted, is legal and happening every 60 seconds in April, May, and June for the following school year. Did I say one million? Make that two.   

It isn't going to stay "legal" with Trump, is what I'm saying. Just a prediction; that just as he has stated they will stop suppressing speech or lose federal dollars, so also admissions will have to be transparent, or no federal dollars. 

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Arrested three years ago. Interesting connection to New Zealand.

Most of this about him is news to me. He was so utterly blackmail-able. It would be so easy to get him to go along with anything they cooked up, if it meant being saved from a felony sexual assault conviction.

SANDY HOOK SHOOTER’S PSYCHIATRIST ARRESTED

“On December 17, 2012 Connecticut police reached Dr. Fox to interview him about the Adam Lanza case. The psychiatrist had moved to New Zealand after things had gotten a bit hot for him in the Northeast.

“Just six months earlier, the 59 year old psychiatrist had been accused of sexual assault of a female patient while practicing as a psychiatrist in Brookfield, Connecticut. The patient in question was 19 years old, and state records show that Fox prescribed her “three to four” psychiatric drugs and also gave her free samples. The girl’s mother stated her daughter “was turning into a zombie.”

“Following this accusation, Dr. Fox voluntarily gave up his license to practice in New York and Connecticut and began working as a psychiatrist in New Zealand, almost 9,000 miles away from his former office.

...

During the phone call with the Connecticut police, Fox stated that the only records he had brought to New Zealand were billing records and that all of his medical records pertaining to clients he treated in the United States were “currently in storage in the United States.”

“Twenty-four hours after that phone call, Dr. Fox contacted the Connecticut police, telling them that any medical records pertaining to Adam Lanza had been destroyed. Based on the investigative records, Fox last saw Lanza in 2007, which means Dr. Fox destroyed Lanza’s psychiatric records two years earlier than the law allows.

...

”Dr. Fox was de-registered by the New Zealand Medical Council in February 2014.

“When Dr. Fox moved back to Maine he discovered his sexual abuse of patients in Connecticut had not been forgotten by the authorities. He was arrested at his home in Peaks Island, Maine on April 20th, 2016 by detectives and Homeland Security Agents and charged with three counts of second-degree sexual assault.”

https://www.cchrflorida.org/sandy-hook-shooters-psychiatrist-arrested/

 

 

 

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The rage the left “feels” blinds them to the fact that Americans are freer, better off, and safer under our great President. They were denied power and they know in their shriveled hearts and heads that they have no chance in 2020. They don’t want justice. They want power over others, a stacked deck, and revenge.   My case for “a plot” rests on the evidence we see. The whole investigation and affair was a coordinated plan to take down a freely elected President. It was meant to hamper his administration even if it harmed the country and the President’s family. Though we the living should not take things too far, we should feel moral outrage at the bastards who have tried to harm our lives for two years. And they have not had ANY second thoughts. They will not stop. Peter

But a cautionary note. Barbara's lecture delivered in 2006 at The Atlas Society summer conference (the link, posted elsewhere on OL by Ed Hudgins, to this article on The Atlas Society's own website has been broken). Objectivism and Rage by Barbara Branden A lecture presented at the TAS 2006 Summer Seminar, July 4, 2006, Chapman University, Orange, CA

One cannot avoid recognizing that we live in a very angry age. At one time, people spoke to “My worthy opponent” when addressing someone who disagreed with their views. That attitude of respecting differences has long disappeared. Today, in discussions of politics, of religion, of environmentalism, of war and peace, of abortion—of all the issues that concern and often divide us—we hear little but raised voices and enraged insults coming from all sides of every issue. Speak to an opponent of the Iraq war and suggest that it might have been a good idea—and a torrent of abuse washes over you. Say that Israel is morally superior to the Palestinians—and statistics about Israel’s supposed “atrocities” of the last 2,000 years fly furiously at your head. Say a kind word about George W. Bush—and you had better take to the hills at once.

Objectivists are by no means immune to this rage. On the contrary, I find it to be increasingly prevalent among Objectivists. We see everywhere—particularly on the Internet—the spectacle of supposed supporters of reason and free inquiry erupting in fury at the least provocation and hurling abuse at anyone who opposes—even questions—their convictions.

But what I call “Objectivist Rage” has a peculiar twist to it, unlikely to be found anywhere else except, paradoxically, in religion. It is almost always morally tinged. Those who question our ideas and those who oppose them, we are told, are not merely unintelligent, ignorant, uninformed; they are evil, they are moral monsters to be cast out and forever damned.

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Fiddle sticks. Barr just said he won’t release the Mueller findings today. Remember the good old days? Ellis Island and earned citizenship? I feel like reshowing these gems. Peter

Earned Citizenship. Who said the following? The answer is at the bottom. "We have to deal with the 11 million individuals who are here illegally. We all agree that these men and women should have to earn their way to citizenship. But for comprehensive immigration reform to work, it must be clear from the outset that there is a pathway to citizenship. We’ve got to lay out a path — a process that includes passing a background check, paying taxes, paying a penalty, learning English, and then going to the back of the line, behind all the folks who are trying to come here legally. That's only fair."

From: "Andrew Taranto" To: <atlantis Subject: Starship Troopers (was Re: ATL: collectivized ethics and US intervention) Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2001 16:37:54 -0500

Ellen L replying to Sandra M: >Joey, you have the great benefit of living in the freest country in the world. I agree with Robert Heinlein's view that citizens should do something to *earn* that citizenship? Ayn Rand earned her citizenship by writing a book that gave an ethical underpinning to laissez-faire capitalism (THE FOUNTAINHEAD) by writing another book that exposed the horrors of life under communism (WE THE LIVING) and by writing ATLAS SHRUGGED and numerous essays that greatly clarified the political and economic thinking of the generations that followed.

 >Robert Heinlein wrote over a period of at least 30 years. I haven't read Starship Troopers but I doubt seriously if he ever really believed that citizenship was to be earned, and if he did I doubt he kept that view.  You might read The Moon is a Harsh Mistress for what was probably more his real view point.  I suspect the character of Prof de la Paz was his role in the book.

In the Starship Troopers ethos, citizenship was "earned" by ~voluntary~ military service; and one could opt out of one's service at any point. Citizenship then gave one the right to vote and hold public offices. It makes some sense: if one wants political power, one must lay one's life on the line. Conversely, force someone to lay his life on the line, and he becomes a thorn in the government's side when he assumes his rightful position in public office.

Also note that non-citizenship did not relegate people to second class status: they were simply barred from voting or holding political offices. Besides the slight enmity between citizens and non-citizens in the book, I really don't think it displayed a caste society in any meaningful sense.

I have no idea if Heinlein ~believed~ in this form of polity; but _Starship Troopers_ made a very compelling (and entertaining) thought experiment. If anything, I think Heinlein provided a viable (or at least semi-viable) alternative to the kind of political order we have now, or at least an interesting principle upon which to base such an alternative (i.e., voluntary citizenship, with full individual rights retained by non-citizens). Laissez-faire, Andrew Taranto

From: Michael Hardy To: atlantis Subject: ATL: Re: Starship Troopers Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2001 18:13:32 -0500 (EST) Andrew Taranto attributed the following to Ellen Lewit: >Robert Heinlein wrote over a period of at least 30 years.

*Only* 30?  Well, it said "at least" 30, but it still seems like a ridiculously small number to assign to this.  Heinlein was diagnosed terminally ill in 1935 (and therefore kicked out of the navy) and died in 1988.  He wrote fiction from 1939 until shortly before his death in 1988, two months before his 81st birthday (he was born on 7/7/07).

>I haven't read Starship Troopers but I doubt seriously if he ever really believed that citizenship was to be earned, and if he did I doubt he kept that view.  You might read The Moon is a Harsh Mistress for what was probably more his real view point.  I suspect the character of Prof de la Paz was his role in the book.

Heinlein did play Devil's advocate a lot. But ferchrissake: Heinlein was no good at non-fiction or philosophy.  I've outgrown the stuff he wrote for primarily adult audiences.  The stuff he wrote for 14-year-olds was GREAT, and I recommend it to adults and to everyone else.  It's unfortunate that crap like “Stranger in a Strange Land” gets so much publicity and turns people off to Heinlein, and then they never read his "juvenile novels" that were originally serialized in the boy scout magazines during the '50's.  Even “Stranger in a Strange Land” was written in an entertaining way, but the plot as a whole has too much silliness that adults will see through.  Not so his "juveniles."  (Yes, they have implausibility’s that you can poke holes in if you like pointing out others' imperfections, but they're not important to the value of the stories.)

Here are some very good ones: Have Space Suit, Will Travel. Starman Jones. The Sky Beast. Farmer in the Sky.

The protagonist of this last one is perhaps 11 or 12 years old   --- younger than most protagonists of Heinlein's "juveniles."  Here's a very interesting tidbit from it: Bill, the protagonist, is the only child of a widower.  He and his father are going to emigrate to a planet being newly colonized, to which emigration is restricted to married couples with children.  The father will marry a widow with a daughter before their departure.  To the son the prospect of colonizing this primitive place is a great adventure, and of course that's why he wants to go.  One day the father is astonished to learn that the son thinks the father is getting married so that he can emigrate.  And then the son is surprised when the father says that's not how it is. The father explains that he is emigrating so that he can re-marry.  He wants to make a kind of complete break with his past life and career for emotional reasons.

In the '50's there were some silly movies about monsters attacking cities, and I don't think they dealt with the lawsuits that would ensue.  Clearly if a monster attacks a city then somebody's going to sue somebody, right?  That's a major part of what “The Sky Beast” is about.  But it's even more complicated: The monster turns out to have relatives in high political offices, and diplomatic hassles turn out to be most of what the story's about.

In “Starman Jones”, Max Jones starts out as a subsistence farmer. Getting from there to being a respected professional is a matter of using your head.  That's the story.  What goes on in Max's head – the workings of his intellect and of his conscience -- are followed, but it's not overly, and certainly not explicitly,  psychological.  When I read it at the age of 15, I was totally surprised by a climactic event, which I only much later realized was, like most of Heinlein's fiction, inspired by Heinlein's own biography.  A hint: Heinlein graduated from the Naval Academy. “Have Space Suit, Will Travel” is delightful and anyone who is not delighted by it is a member of the Taliban and is hereby scheduled to be an organ-donor for heart- lung- and liver-patients tomorrow morning. Everyone here is ordered to read the first chapter of it tonight. You'll love Kip Russell's father.  (It's also the book from which, at the age of 11, I first heard of MIT.) Mike Hardy end quote 

It was, President Barack Obama, January 29, 2013.

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If anyone wants to get into the weeds with what really happened in the Deep State attempted takedown of President Trump, the following is one of the best documented timelines I have come across.

I'm putting this in the conspiracy thread because in this very thread, the very existence of the Deep State was mocked.

The timeline article below shows how it operates, albeit, the term "Deep State" is not used in it.

Spygate: The Inside Story Behind the Alleged Plot to Take Down Trump

The word "alleged" is telling to me. I expect this topic to see a lot of courtroom in the not so distant future. So the legal hedge is included for now.

It's a long read and I only got halfway through it so far. But I'm captivated. I will finish it.

There's a 44 minute video at the beginning that is basically a lady reading the article but presenting it like a news cast, with B Roll and everything. She takes a few liberties at times, but they are minor and mostly for flow.

This is a hell of a great job. The author, Jeff Carlson, started the story back in 2011 when DOJ Inspector General Michael Horowitz got his power usurped by Eric Holder and Sally Yates under the Obama administration and goes all the way up to a 2017 FISA court ruling. There are many names of people who don't normally appear in the news along with the usual suspects, lots of dates, interdepartment squabbles and intrigues, constant misbehavior by top officials, all kinds of information. 

And they all lead up to the following paragraph:

Quote

Virtually every FBI and NSD official with material involvement in the original Carter Page FISA application would later be removed—either through firing or resignation.

This one's a keeper, just for the research alone.

Michael

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Alex Jones was deposed in a judicial proceeding surrounding his Sandy Hook 'Hoax' broadcasts.  The deposition was recorded on video and made public yesterday.

This is from a Huffington Post story, "We Got Alex Jones' Deposition Video. It Was A Predictable Disaster For Him" ...

Quote

Jones is asked about the supposed “deep research” he did on the shooting shortly after being read the official report: 

Bankston: Okay. Thank you, Mr. Jones. Mr. Jones, I’ve noticed on a lot of these answers you’ve said, “Well, I’m just going off what Mr. [Wolfgang] Halbig said.” So what I want to know is: When you talked earlier about how you did deep research, what was that? What deep research did you do?

Jones: Well, I mean, I did look at the news articles saying they were being very secretive about the case, that a lot of things were sealed, which is unusual. There were lawsuits involved with that, and I did do research on [Michael] Bloomberg putting out an e-mail the day before saying, “Get ready. There’s going to be a big event,” you know, just straight up, people waiting around for mass shootings or whatever. And just the way the media made a spectacle out of it right away is what really made me question. That scene like with the WMDs or babies in the incubators, I just saw the media so on it, so ready; and I thought that added credibility to it.

Bankston: Okay. I mean, I’m glad you brought up the Bloomberg thing. I remember there was a couple of episodes where you talked about this Bloomberg e-mail and you said to your audience that there was an e-mail that came out in the lawsuit where Bloomberg told his people: Get ready in the next 24 hours to capitalize on a mass shooting. That didn’t happen; that’s not a real e-mail, is it?

Barnes: Objection as to form.

Jones:  I mean, I don’t think it’s exactly that; but there’s one similar to that.

Bankston: Yeah. I mean, what you said is not real.

The full transcript also reveals that Jones had correspondence with Wolfgang Halbig, a notorious Sandy Hook conspiracist who exchanged more than 4,000 emails with Infowars. Halbig was recently found to have also been in contact with an NRA official discussing unfounded conspiracies about mass shootings, HuffPost reported Wednesday. In the deposition, Bankston refers to Halbig as a “raving lunatic.”

A brief from the New York Times on Jones's "sourcing."

 

More on Wolfgang Halbig.

Edited by william.scherk
Added tweet-with-video from NYT.
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15 minutes ago, william.scherk said:

My favorite part of the article is this:

Quote

From the start of the surreal deposition, Jones’ lawyers whined and sparred often with Lewis’ attorney.

I might watch the YouTube videos because I don't recall ever witnessing a lawyer whine in court.

I've seen a lot of court videos and court TV and, finally, I might get to see what a whining lawyer looks and sounds like.

For Alex Jones's lawyer to whine and whine and whine like the article says, he must have really been ashamed and scared...

:evil:  :) 

A quality article, let me tell ya'...

:) 

Michael

 

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16 minutes ago, Michael Stuart Kelly said:

For Alex Jones's lawyer to whine and whine and whine like the article says, he must have really been ashamed and scared...

I'm over 20 minutes into the video and I still haven't heard any whining.

See for yourself:

How odd.

:evil:  :) 

I don't have time to see more...

So I guess it's another opportunity lost...

yawn...

I wish Alex luck on his court case. From what I saw from his interviewer, the lawyer suing doesn't have much of a case other than trying to get people to feel sorry for the parents of the murdered children. Or at least, this particular lawyer isn't very good at presenting the case. Instead of citing law and so on, the interviewer keeps trying to lead Alex to make "shameful" statements, meaning what a modern progressive would call shameful, in contradiction to what Alex has said a gazillion times in public. And Alex kept repeating what he always said, which, as I understand it, is perfectly legal.

Who knows, though? Judges tend to advocate from the bench these days. But even if Alex loses, if litigation unfolds in the tenor of this deposition, an appeal will be a slam dunk.

Michael

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8 hours ago, Jonathan said:

Well, don't have a insane meltdown tantrum about it, jeez.

Jonathan,

But.. but... but... isn't the fact that now they've got Alex Jones... this time he's talking to a lawyer... and it's official and all... and Sandy Hook for goddsake?... isn't that proof that Alex Jones should be in jail or shot or something?... boy is he a goner...

I mean, even his lawyer is whining...

Just like Trump's legal counsel whined all through the Mueller investigation... they whined and whined... hell even Trump whined right from the very beginning back in 2015:

:) 

Crony progressives always like to see their opponents whining...

They dine on it spiritually...

It proves they already won.

:) 

You better watch out or they'll have you whining, whining about climate change, and then, man, will you be sorry...

:) 

Michael

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