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Ed Hudgins

Are Pre-School Grad Celebrations Going Too Far?

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Are Pre-School Grad Celebrations Going Too Far?
By Edward Hudgins

A mere five years after holding my newborn fraternal twin girls in my arms, I’ve just watched them graduate pre-school. When I was young, we marked the transition out of high school, college, and that was it. Has our culture—and I—gone too far with celebrations?

Motivations for celebrations

When I was a kid, celebrations of birthdays and other personal milestones were modest. Family, a few friends, a few gifts, fun. But now I see parents of kids who haven’t reached kindergarten renting out kiddie-playland gyms and inviting dozens of children and families for big parties. I see elaborate Bar Mitzvah bashes and sweet-sixteen shindigs. Celebrations for graduations at almost every academic level are added to the calendar. I hear complaints that parents are going overboard, being too commercial or materialistic.

Are such celebrations good or bad? It depends. If the goal of parents is to show off to other parents, the answer is “Bad!” Or if parents somehow equate monetary expenditures with loving their children, again, their values are mixed up to say the least.

If, on the other hand, the parents just want to see their children delighted, well, I cannot think of a more delightful thing than that!

In the case of my girlies’ pre-school graduation, my motivation was more multifaceted. I wanted to celebrate their achievement and to instill in them the value of achieving.

 

Child-rearing: raising human beings

In Atlas Shrugged the heroine Dagny Taggart encounters a young woman and her husband who have retreated from the world with their two young sons. The boys “had the open, joyous, friendly confidence of kittens” and a “non-boastful sense of their own value.” They had “the eager curiosity that would venture anywhere.” The woman explains that she seeks “to bring up my sons as human beings. I would not surrender them to the educational systems devised to stunt a child’s brain, to convince him that reason is impotent, that existence is an irrational chaos with

which he’s unable to deal, and thus reduce him to a state of chronic fear.”

My wife Talia and I put our daughters in a small co-op school. That meant we and the other parents were not only investing our money but also our time and effort into our kids’ education. Parents would help in classrooms and assist with fundraising and other school activities. My wife especially came to know the other parents as well as the children who had become our daughters’ friends. And we parents, from America, India, Japan, Korea, Jordan, Colombia, and all over the world, were united in the goal of seeing that our children learn.

 

Education for the love of learning

Over the past two years, we have watched our daughters’ love for learning... (Continue reading here.)

 

Twins graduation gowns SSSSMALLlll.jpg

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49 minutes ago, Ed Hudgins said:

Are Pre-School Grad Celebrations Going Too Far?
By Edward Hudgins

A mere five years after holding my newborn fraternal twin girls in my arms, I’ve just watched them graduate pre-school. When I was young, we marked the transition out of high school, college, and that was it. Has our culture—and I—gone too far with celebrations?

Motivations for celebrations

When I was a kid, celebrations of birthdays and other personal milestones were modest. Family, a few friends, a few gifts, fun. But now I see parents of kids who haven’t reached kindergarten renting out kiddie-playland gyms and inviting dozens of children and families for big parties. I see elaborate Bar Mitzvah bashes and sweet-sixteen shindigs. Celebrations for graduations at almost every academic level are added to the calendar. I hear complaints that parents are going overboard, being too commercial or materialistic.

Are such celebrations good or bad? It depends. If the goal of parents is to show off to other parents, the answer is “Bad!” Or if parents somehow equate monetary expenditures with loving their children, again, their values are mixed up to say the least.

If, on the other hand, the parents just want to see their children delighted, well, I cannot think of a more delightful thing than that!

In the case of my girlies’ pre-school graduation, my motivation was more multifaceted. I wanted to celebrate their achievement and to instill in them the value of achieving.

 

Child-rearing: raising human beings

In Atlas Shrugged the heroine Dagny Taggart encounters a young woman and her husband who have retreated from the world with their two young sons. The boys “had the open, joyous, friendly confidence of kittens” and a “non-boastful sense of their own value.” They had “the eager curiosity that would venture anywhere.” The woman explains that she seeks “to bring up my sons as human beings. I would not surrender them to the educational systems devised to stunt a child’s brain, to convince him that reason is impotent, that existence is an irrational chaos with

which he’s unable to deal, and thus reduce him to a state of chronic fear.”

My wife Talia and I put our daughters in a small co-op school. That meant we and the other parents were not only investing our money but also our time and effort into our kids’ education. Parents would help in classrooms and assist with fundraising and other school activities. My wife especially came to know the other parents as well as the children who had become our daughters’ friends. And we parents, from America, India, Japan, Korea, Jordan, Colombia, and all over the world, were united in the goal of seeing that our children learn.

 

Education for the love of learning

Over the past two years, we have watched our daughters’ love for learning... (Continue reading here.)

 

Twins graduation gowns SSSSMALLlll.jpg

Nice looking kids....

About three years younger than my youngest grand-daughter.   

You will have happy times and anxious times but there is nothing like bringing up kids.

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2 hours ago, Ed Hudgins said:

Are Pre-School Grad Celebrations Going Too Far?
By Edward Hudgins

A mere five years after holding my newborn fraternal twin girls in my arms, I’ve just watched them graduate pre-school. When I was young, we marked the transition out of high school, college, and that was it. Has our culture—and I—gone too far with celebrations?

Yes.

--Brant

helping you figure it out:evil::)

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