Windows 10 - Robin: Holy conspiracy theory!


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Robin, the junior partner of Batman, had the habit of saying "holy" something.

Every time I buy a new computer (always with Windows on it), I replace Windows with gnu+linux. End of all problems with Windows. Gives Microsoft the finger. Whatever (good things) Windows can do, gnu+linux can do the same thing. It can even run Windows programs that Windows can't run, using wine.

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Was this tongue in cheek?

Sound the clarion call, to the ramparts!

I understand Windows, since 3.1 thats a mainstay os. Sure suffered the occasional crash or virus, only once did I lose significant data. But that was "my" loss not MS's.

Just tried Linux Mint to see whether there are compatibility issues. It looks friendly enough. Im probably a couple of time honored apps away from it.

The lady with the prell hair cant demonize it enough, extracting just enough from the TOA to put it on par with Russkies trying to penetrate a TEMPESTed machine.

I read the agreement, its not what she gushingly intimates. She starts with if its free it cant be worth anything rant.

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/servicesagreement/

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/privacystatement/default.aspx

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I don't like the idea of voice recognition software that records everything you say, or the fact that other programs can turn your computer screen into a movie camera aimed at you. This sounds like Big Brother, big intrusion, and a computer hack of your personal life that I do not want.

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I don't like the idea of voice recognition software that records everything you say, or the fact that other programs can turn your computer screen into a movie camera aimed at you. This sounds like Big Brother, big intrusion, and a computer hack of your personal life that I do not want.

With what lens????

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Skype. Virtually any TV or monitor can be turned into a window, but I don't know how. There would need to be a sequence of picture in, picture out so either electronic signals / pixels would need to exit your TV. Aluminum foil around your head won't protect them from stealing your thoughts either, (joke) though a Farragut Cage will protect your credit card information from being received..

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Guy Adams for the Daily Mail Published: 20:37 EST, 25 November 2013 | Updated: 04:37 EST, 26 November 2013. You are sitting in bed in your pajamas, drinking a cup of cocoa. A loved one lies next to you, watching late-night television. Pillow talk is exchanged. An alarm clock is set. Eventually the lights are turned out. Earlier, you sat on the living-room sofa eating supper, before loading the dishwasher and heading upstairs. You have, in other words, just enjoyed a perfectly normal night, in a perfectly normal home. The curtains are drawn, the central heating turned up. It’s cozy, relaxing and, above all, completely private. Or so you thought. The truth turns out to be quite the opposite. For on the other side of the world, people you didn’t know existed are keeping a beady eye on your every move.

These characters can see what clothes you have been wearing and what food you’ve eaten. They heard every word you said, and logged every TV show you watched. Some are criminals, others work for major corporations. And now they know your most intimate secrets. It may sound like a plot summary for a futuristic science-fiction movie. But real-life versions of this Orwellian scenario are being played out every day in towns and cities across the globe — and in most cases the victims have no idea. At fault is a common electronic device invented nearly a century ago and found in almost every modern household: the domestic television set. Put simply, our TVs have started spying on us.

Last week, there was a high-profile case in point. An IT consultant called Jason Huntley, who lives in a village near Hull, uncovered evidence that a flat-screen television, which had been sitting in his living room since the summer, was secretly invading his family’s privacy. He began investigating the £400 LG device after noticing that its home screen appeared to be showing him ‘targeted’ adverts — for cars, and Knorr stock cubes — based on programs he’d just been watching. Huntley decided to monitor information that the so-called smart TV — which connects to the internet — was sending and receiving. He did this by using his laptop effectively as a bridge between his television and the internet receiver, so the laptop was able to show all the data being sucked out of his set. He soon discovered that details of not just every show he watched but every button he pressed on his remote control were being sent back to LG’s corporate headquarters in South Korea.
There, the electronics company appeared to be using its customers’ data to make money. A promotional video shown to commercial clients suggested that data was being used to provide ‘the ad experience you have always dreamed of’. The information Huntley’s TV had sent — without his knowledge — included the contents of his private digital video collection, which he’d watched on the television. This included camcorder footage of family celebrations containing images of his wife and two young children. Most worrying of all, the device continued sending such information to Korea even after Huntley had adjusted the television’s default settings to ‘opt out’ of data sharing.

Huntley wrote about the findings on his blog. After his case was picked up by mainstream news outlets, LG announced an investigation. ‘Customer privacy is a top priority,’ the firm said. ‘We are looking into reports that certain viewing information on LG smart TVs was shared without consent. LG has also removed its promotional video about targeted advertising from its website. The Information Commissioner’s Office says it is now investigating the firm for a ‘possible breach’ of the Data Protection Act. Jason Huntley, meanwhile, tells me he is ‘very suspicious and also a little worried’ by the affair.
‘I don’t think we’ve heard the last of this. Who knows what else these televisions are doing that we don’t know about?’ It doesn’t take much digging to find out. Talk to any IT security expert and they will tell you that Huntley’s discovery is probably the tip of the iceberg. What’s to blame is the continuing rise of smart televisions, which account for most new TV sets sold and are predicted to be in more than half of British homes by 2016. These high-tech devices differ from traditional televisions in that they are not just passive boxes that receive a signal and transfer it to a backlit screen. Instead, they are essentially computers that connect to the internet — and so also send information back the other way. In theory, this can be extremely useful. For example, many smart TVs have shopping ‘apps’ to access Amazon. They connect to iTunes. They allow us to watch YouTube, instantly download films via Netflix, stream BBC shows on iPlayer, and talk to friends using the video phone link Skype.

But in practice, like almost every type of computer, they can be all-too-easily hacked. And unlike PCs, almost all of which have fairly good anti-virus ‘firewalls’, smart TVs have little or no such software. Indeed, most have been designed so that outside software — including anti-virus programs — can never be installed.

This year, Luigi Auriemma, an IT security researcher and computer programmer from Malta, demonstrated the risks that these devices pose when he showed it was possible to hack into several types of Samsung smart televisions.

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Almost since the advent of cable providers have been able to track the programming their customers have been using. Seeing and hearing everything people are doing in their homes through their TV sets is bullshit. Your credibility is zero, you are on the wrong website. Go to "UFO's are real" or some such other bullshit site. Or get a job or another hobby. Stop using technology, especially the internet.

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Mikee wrote: Seeing and hearing everything people are doing in their homes through their TV sets is bullshit.
end quote

I remember when Nielson TV tracking service had devices in people’s homes to track what they watched. Not any more. I knew Comcast, Mediacom, and other cable services can track what you watch from a newspaper article a few years ago but I don’t know specifically how. Ratings are based less on people answering their phones and taking a survey. So, are you saying you must have skype, a camera, microphone or some similar device to be bugged in your home? I admit my knowledge of this comes from articles I’ve read over the years and from fictional novels. Can’t be done you say? BS? Scifi? There is no Homeland Security, no NSA, no CIA snooping except with planted bugs or directional microphones? And you say your name is Mike, short for microphone? Those “nanny” tracking devices on your phone don’t exist, the police can’t track you through credit card use, etc.? Wow. You are so smart.

About ten years ago my sister called me over her computer but I don’t remember how that was done, (but I remember setting up a mike) and when the call was finished I thought that was the end to it. Yet hours later, I could hear my sister talking to someone in her computer room. I yelled into my computer and she finally heard me and shut the device off. I have been leery ever since. But you’re not? About six months ago we set up a new wifi system to download books, and suddenly our internet usage went up. I was told a person would need to be within a certain distance from my house to be able to steal my service. Do you have any facts to back up your assertion?

This is kind of funny. Two girls working around here for the summer were living in their car, off on a side road, near my house. One night I heard a woman's voice, went outside and a girl was talking on a phone, and charging another phone, using my outside receptacle. She yanked it out and ran. I didn't call the cops but a few days later the cops were down the road talking to them and they left and never came back.

Peter

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Adam wrote: And it has a touch of the Sicilian families "fo get about it!"
end quote

Fo get? Are you attempting to slur Sicilians? Ethnic humor is not always an attempt to demean a group. Remember the Marx Brothers? Was one of them slurring Italians by speaking in dialect? Was another one making fun of deaf and dumb people? Was George Carlin demeaning weed users with his Hippy Dippy Weatherman? All of those are funny. No need to be thin skinned and PC. When I said I might forget and say something like fo get about it I meant I would forget about it and . . . er . . . walk like an Egyptian talking like an immigrant Italian. I forget things due to age.

Peter

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Mikee wrote: Seeing and hearing everything people are doing in their homes through their TV sets is bullshit.

end quote

I remember when Nielson TV tracking service had devices in people’s homes to track what they watched. Not any more. I knew Comcast, Mediacom, and other cable services can track what you watch from a newspaper article a few years ago but I don’t know specifically how. Ratings are based less on people answering their phones and taking a survey. So, are you saying you must have skype, a camera, microphone or some similar device to be bugged in your home? I admit my knowledge of this comes from articles I’ve read over the years and from fictional novels. Can’t be done you say? BS? Scifi? There is no Homeland Security, no NSA, no CIA snooping except with planted bugs or directional microphones? And you say your name is Mike, short for microphone? Those “nanny” tracking devices on your phone don’t exist, the police can’t track you through credit card use, etc.? Wow. You are so smart.

About ten years ago my sister called me over her computer but I don’t remember how that was done, (but I remember setting up a mike) and when the call was finished I thought that was the end to it. Yet hours later, I could hear my sister talking to someone in her computer room. I yelled into my computer and she finally heard me and shut the device off. I have been leery ever since. But you’re not? About six months ago we set up a new wifi system to download books, and suddenly our internet usage went up. I was told a person would need to be within a certain distance from my house to be able to steal my service. Do you have any facts to back up your assertion?

This is kind of funny. Two girls working around here for the summer were living in their car, off on a side road, near my house. One night I heard a woman's voice, went outside and a girl was talking on a phone, and charging another phone, using my outside receptacle. She yanked it out and ran. I didn't call the cops but a few days later the cops were down the road talking to them and they left and never came back.

Peter

Peter,

I don't like dishonesty in any form. Your large amount of gibberish containing implications of things that are not true is dishonest. A television contains neither a microphone or a camera. Using Skype requires both. If you set up a connection and broadcast your voice and picture to another person of course it can be intercepted. So what. If you don't shut the fucking thing off, what happens? It's still on! Surprise! Not a conspiracy to invade your privacy. If your toilet keeps running and you don't fix it, your water bill is higher!! Not a conspiracy by the water company to screw you out of your money! This is not rocket science. If you think something you're doing is important from a privacy standpoint, encrypt it. 99.999999% of information transmitted over the internet is of no interest to anyone.

Your signal to noise ratio is vanishingly small. I suggest much shorter, to the point offers with an occasional nugget of real information.

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Adam wrote: And it has a touch of the Sicilian families "fo get about it!"

end quote

Fo get? Are you attempting to slur Sicilians? Ethnic humor is not always an attempt to demean a group. Remember the Marx Brothers? Was one of them slurring Italians by speaking in dialect? Was another one making fun of deaf and dumb people? Was George Carlin demeaning weed users with his Hippy Dippy Weatherman? All of those are funny. No need to be thin skinned and PC. When I said I might forget and say something like fo get about it I meant I would forget about it and . . . er . . . walk like an Egyptian talking like an immigrant Italian. I forget things due to age.

Peter

Hey! Watsamatter you?

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Abasta! You stoppa being alla tutto sale e pepe, and donta be saccente. Instead I wish you buona fortuna causa this is a gomito del pane! Gelato!

Joisey translation: Enough! Stop being so lively and cheerful (all salt and pepper,) and a smart ass. Instead I wish you good luck, because this is the end of the bread. Time for ice cream!

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I will give my two cats a hug and a pet, but Brant? A seal? Now, I freely admit cats have fish breath but at least they chew their food and don't swallow whole fish. Yuck! A seal's burps must be (cat)astrophic. And a seals whiskers? they should grow a handle bar mustache. Brant you don't understand me because as Jack Nickleson in the shining said to Shelly Duval, you can't handle the truth.

Oddly as I have gotten older and reviewed my life (probably due to meds or wisdom) I think I do understand myself. Regrets? I have a few. But I did it myyyy wayyyyy.

Local news is showing Biden bawling on the late show, having doubts about running. Remember when Rush supported Hillary over Obama in 2008? That was funny though it didn't work.

JC Benny

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