a great idea for making money


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First get yourself a Dr. in front of your name and a MD after your name. Now you are ready to make money. The MD stands for Medical Deity. People will believe whatever you say and do whatever you tell them to do.

Here is an example.

http://www.wakingtimes.com/2015/01/07/doctors-confess-making-cancer-diagnoses-just-profit/

Take Dr. Farid Fata, a prominent cancer doctor in Michigan who admitted in court one year ago to intentionally and wrongfully diagnosing healthy people with cancer. Fata also admitted to giving them chemotherapy drugs for the purpose of making a profit.

Were his patients shocked? You bet they were. Who would ever suspect a Doctor of faking a diagnosis to collect money. It’s unconscionable. Yet it happens with cancer and almost every disease that medical doctors can generate income through kickbacks and commissions based on the volume of patients treated with specific pharmaceuticals. Like anything people are used as a comodity.

“Many of these unscrupulous Physicians are like businessmen without a conscience. The only difference is they have your health and trust in their hands–a very dangerous combination when money is involved,” said Dr. Sayed Mohammed, a retired Oncologist who admits seeing the trend more than a decade ago.

“It is my choice,” Fata said on Tuesday of his surprise guilty plea, which included rattling off the names of numerous drugs he prescribed for his patients over the years. In each admission, he uttered these words:

“I knew that it was medically unnecessary.”

Fata was charged with running a $35-million Medicare fraud scheme that involved billing the government for medically unnecessary oncology and hematology treatments. The government says Fata ran the scheme from 2009 to the present, through his medical businesses, including Michigan Hematology Oncology Centers, with offices in Clarkston, Bloomfield Hills, Lapeer, Sterling Heights, Troy and Oak Park.

According to the government, Fata had a patient load of 1,200 people and received $62 million from Medicare; he billed for more than $150 million.

A wonderful way to make money. But first you gotta get yourself a Dr. in front of your name and a MD after your name. That's the ticket.

Just make sure you don't get caught. The law does not necessarily appreciate money makers.

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This topic brings to mind, if my recollection is correct, of what was said by Francisco in Atlas Shrugged:

"Did you get your money by fraud? By pandering to men's vices or men's stupidity? By catering to fools, in the hope of getting more than your ability deserves? By lowering your standards? By doing work you despise for purchasers you scorn? If so, then your money will not give you a moment's or penny's worth of joy. Then the things you buy will become, not a tribute to you, but a reproach; not an achievement, but a reminder of shame. ....... Or did you say it's the love of money that's the root of all evil? To love a thing is to know and love its nature. To love money is to know and love the fact that money is the creation of the best power within you, and your passkey to trade your effort for the effort of the best among men. It's the person who would sell his soul for a nickel, who is the loudest in proclaiming his hatred for money - and he has good reason to hate it. The lovers of money are willing to work for it. They know they are able to deserve it."

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Let's see. A bank robber is a human being. I am a human being. Therefore I am a bank robber moral equivalent. Nothing I won't do for money.

--Brant

I did not say or suggest or imply that all doctors are crooks. Only that it is easy for a doctor to be a crook because he is trusted as a Medical Deity.

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Let's see. A bank robber is a human being. I am a human being. Therefore I am a bank robber moral equivalent. Nothing I won't do for money.

--Brant

I did not say or suggest or imply that all doctors are crooks. Only that it is easy for a doctor to be a crook because he is trusted as a Medical Deity.

A podiatrist I knew once said to me that orthopedic doctors like to cut...that's how they make their money.

Subsequently, I mentioned what he said to an orthopedic doctor I know and he said the same about podiatrists.

Yes, doctors make more money with surgeries as opposed to evaluations & some of them will suggest the surgery when you really don't need it.

Trust is involved for sure and that's why I do some research on every doctor I see, especially looking for feedback from people who have been their patients.

-J

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Let's see. A bank robber is a human being. I am a human being. Therefore I am a bank robber moral equivalent. Nothing I won't do for money.

--Brant

I did not say or suggest or imply that all doctors are crooks. Only that it is easy for a doctor to be a crook because he is trusted as a Medical Deity.

The reader can take a pick from "many" to "most"--I'll give you the "all."

Medicare fraud is the wrong horse to ride to make your point because Medicare has to be netted out. This particular doctor was scum and that is what you demonstrated. Period.

--Brant

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Many people crap on lawyers too. Until they need a good one.

You'll likely need a good one because lawyers made it so. Doctors making their patients sick so they then need a "good one" would be similar in principle, even worse in practice.

Here is why you need a bad lawyer--aside from what happened in "Body Heat": You're so obviously guilty at trial your horrible lawyer creates all sorts of basis for appeal so the conviction is thrown out. The more time passes the better chance you have. Maybe you'll have time to get the main witness against you whacked. Etc.

--Brant

I'm always thinking of scummy things I could do if I were scum but lack of sociopathy always stops me--plus, I could ask that Objectivish question: What would Roark do? (blow up a housing project?)--uh, I mean: What would Galt do? (let the world go to hell)--uh, I mean, What would Rand do? (Oh, never mind!)

What would Nietzsche do? (Go crazy)

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This topic brings to mind, if my recollection is correct, of what was said by Francisco in Atlas Shrugged:

"Did you get your money by fraud? By pandering to men's vices or men's stupidity? By catering to fools, in the hope of getting more than your ability deserves? By lowering your standards? By doing work you despise for purchasers you scorn? If so, then your money will not give you a moment's or penny's worth of joy. Then the things you buy will become, not a tribute to you, but a reproach; not an achievement, but a reminder of shame. ....... Or did you say it's the love of money that's the root of all evil? To love a thing is to know and love its nature. To love money is to know and love the fact that money is the creation of the best power within you, and your passkey to trade your effort for the effort of the best among men. It's the person who would sell his soul for a nickel, who is the loudest in proclaiming his hatred for money - and he has good reason to hate it. The lovers of money are willing to work for it. They know they are able to deserve it."

Joe,

I've always had trouble with this passage. Even when I read it for the first time.

I met several people during my life who gained a lot of money by fraud. I never witnessed any behavior by them that indicated they did not enjoy their money, but instead money was "a reminder of shame."

Heh.

I wanted to believe fraud and theft causes shame my entire life. My Christian upbringing said this made sense. Rand said it openly. Gullible me believed it and dreamer me still wants to believe it.

But what I have seen with greedy fraudulent people differs. I've mostly seen them use ill gotten loot as a tool for controlling others. Not all greedy fraudulent people, but many.

(Man, come to think of it, I've known way too many greedy fraudulent people over my life. :smile: )

In fact, I don't think the emotion of shame is among the top emotions felt by thieves. If they ever have a religious conversion or adopt a philosophy like Objectivism, they feel shame and guilt over what they did. But that is later. Their world view changes when they convert.

In my experience, during the doing of the frauds and the spending of the money, their worldview is different than later. They live accordingly without feeling much shame.

Sometimes I have seen thieves feel shame if they got caught, but I believe the social spotlight on them while people point the finger does more to account for that than actually getting money by illicit means.

On a personal level, I fell out of love with money.

This sounds weird, but it's true.

I've been trying to fall back in love with it, but it's been tough to change this feeling. This is not because I don't feel pride in my production and wed that to money. I do that just fine.

My problem is I've had lots of money a couple of times in life (gained by proper means) and it has changed everyone around me, including me. Suddenly my jokes were funny, even the lame ones, people constantly said how much they missed me, man was I popular, and on and on until they made a sting or the betrayal hit. On my end, I liked the feeling of power and, like a dork, let it go to my head.

I feel slightly embarrassed for being stupid and allowing my lizard brain to get smug, but I have gotten over that. I feel no shame at all for that, nor did I ever. I perceived what was going on and changed.

What I did feel was what I ended up saying to myself, "If this is what a lot of money brings, fuck it."

I have since learned this is not a good place to be. :smile: But at least it's a decision I made and was not imposed on me from the outside by having a lot of money.

On my road back to valuing money, I came across a marvelous book: Thou Shall Prosper: Ten Commandments for Making Money by Rabbi Daniel Lapin. I only read it once, but it destroyed my disdain for money. I already practice a lot of what is in that book--like having lots of books around and reading them, making honest deals, producing, and so on--so I resonated with it, even if the title sounds a bit like hype. I got this book after I saw Lapin speak a few times.

I'm not in love again, but I'm no longer negative about money. I wish I could say this was due to the values I gained from Rand, but I can't. Some values are the same, but my change comes from getting a different perspective on what I believed, taking stock of what I did and thought, adopting different values in a few cases, and taking informed action.

Also, I have involved myself with some people who are trying to encourage me to love money again. Not self-help people or gurus.

Partners.

I don't want to talk too much about this until it happens, but I think we will actually make a lot of money. (Crossed fingers.) But this time around I know what to look for when it comes.

Michael

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This topic brings to mind, if my recollection is correct, of what was said by Francisco in Atlas Shrugged:

"Did you get your money by fraud? By pandering to men's vices or men's stupidity? By catering to fools, in the hope of getting more than your ability deserves? By lowering your standards? By doing work you despise for purchasers you scorn? If so, then your money will not give you a moment's or penny's worth of joy. Then the things you buy will become, not a tribute to you, but a reproach; not an achievement, but a reminder of shame. ....... Or did you say it's the love of money that's the root of all evil? To love a thing is to know and love its nature. To love money is to know and love the fact that money is the creation of the best power within you, and your passkey to trade your effort for the effort of the best among men. It's the person who would sell his soul for a nickel, who is the loudest in proclaiming his hatred for money - and he has good reason to hate it. The lovers of money are willing to work for it. They know they are able to deserve it."

Joe,

I've always had trouble with this passage. Even when I read it for the first time.

I met several people during my life who gained a lot of money by fraud. I never witnessed any behavior by them that indicated they did not enjoy their money, but instead money was "a reminder of shame."

Heh.

I wanted to believe fraud and theft causes shame my entire life. My Christian upbringing said this made sense. Rand said it openly. Gullible me believed it and dreamer me still wants to believe it.

But what I have seen with greedy fraudulent people differs. I've mostly seen them use ill gotten loot as a tool for controlling others. Not all greedy fraudulent people, but many.

(Man, come to think of it, I've known way too many greedy fraudulent people over my life. :smile: )

In fact, I don't think the emotion of shame is among the top emotions felt by thieves. If they ever have a religious conversion or adopt a philosophy like Objectivism, they feel shame and guilt over what they did. But that is later. Their world view changes when they convert.

In my experience, during the doing of the frauds and the spending of the money, their worldview is different than later. They live accordingly without feeling much shame.

Sometimes I have seen thieves feel shame if they got caught, but I believe the social spotlight on them while people point the finger does more to account for that than actually getting money by illicit means.

On a personal level, I fell out of love with money.

This sounds weird, but it's true.

I've been trying to fall back in love with it, but it's been tough to change this feeling. This is not because I don't feel pride in my production and wed that to money. I do that just fine.

My problem is I've had lots of money a couple of times in life (gained by proper means) and it has changed everyone around me, including me. Suddenly my jokes were funny, even the lame ones, people constantly said how much they missed me, man was I popular, and on and on until they made a sting or the betrayal hit. On my end, I liked the feeling of power and, like a dork, let it go to my head.

I feel slightly embarrassed for being stupid and allowing my lizard brain to get smug, but I have gotten over that. I feel no shame at all for that, nor did I ever. I perceived what was going on and changed.

What I did feel was what I ended up saying to myself, "If this is what a lot of money brings, fuck it."

I have since learned this is not a good place to be. :smile: But at least it's a decision I made and was not imposed on me from the outside by having a lot of money.

On my road back to valuing money, I came across a marvelous book: Thou Shall Prosper: Ten Commandments for Making Money by Rabbi Daniel Lapin. I only read it once, but it destroyed my disdain for money. I already practice a lot of what is in that book--like having lots of books around and reading them, making honest deals, producing, and so on--so I resonated with it, even if the title sounds a bit like hype. I got this book after I saw Lapin speak a few times.

I'm not in love again, but I'm no longer negative about money. I wish I could say this was due to the values I gained from Rand, but I can't. Some values are the same, but my change comes from getting a different perspective on what I believed, taking stock of what I did and thought, adopting different values in a few cases, and taking informed action.

Also, I have involved myself with some people who are trying to encourage me to love money again. Not self-help people or gurus.

Partners.

I don't want to talk too much about this until it happens, but I think we will actually make a lot of money. (Crossed fingers.) But this time around I know what to look for when it comes.

Michael

Michael,

I can appreciate your take on money. I hope you get what you want to achieve.

Mine goes back to when I was still in Elementary School. Back then I shoveled snow, set up pins, worked in Xmas tree lots tying the trees to the purchasers cars for tips, caddied, washed cars, etc. I wanted money so I could purchase things I liked (nice quality clothes, sports equipment, records, etc.) or things I wanted to do (go to a Yankee game, play for 2 hrs. @ a pool hall, get on a bus to Coney Island for the rides & food, etc.)

Both my parents would encourage me to work, even at this young age.

Throughout my life I've sat in the valleys & on top of the hills...periods of living paycheck to paycheck, with enough money to only obtain only the bare essentials & periods of abundance where I could have the freedom to do & buy more of those things that make me happy. I really prefer the hills.

I've been quite comfortable for the past 20 or so yrs sitting atop a hill...the result of successful & honest business ventures. Can I make more money? sure, but that would require more time allocated. I'd rather spend my time doing other things like swimming, weight training, on the computer, reading, eating out, etc., & not "having" to be some where at a particular time because I "need" to earn more. This works for me, especially since, as AR said in an interview on Donahue I believe... something to the effect, my (good) time on this earth is rather limited...especially considering my age, which is 68.

-Joe :smile:

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Now here is a guy who knows how to make a lot of money. Surprisingly, the bulk does not come from gaming.

http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2015/01/17/can-you-guess-which-las-vegas-casino-makes-the-mos.aspx

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