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Objectivist Novels- Not By Ayn Rand

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I am just beginning the third part of Atlas Shrugged and I am sad to see it end. My perspective on life has certainly been changed, and I am so glad I decided to read this book. My question pertains to objectivist novels, are there other novels that preach objectivism not written by Ayn Rand. I never like to read the same author twice in a row and would like the read something in-between Atlas Shrugged and Fountainhead.

Thanks,

David C.

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Welcome to OL David.

I am partial to Heinlein's The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress which touches on Objectivist themes.

However, others here might have better choices for you.

At least you, as a Dallas Cowboys fan, can be very patient waiting for a Super Bowl appearance, or, a novelist with Objectivist themes.

A...

Jest joshin with you...

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Thank you both for the feedback, this is exactly what I was looking for!

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Are you really looking to be preached to? Most of us, when we pick a novel, are looking to be entertained.

That said, some novelists have spent time in Rand's orbit. Kay Nolte Smith may be the best-known. A Tale of the Wind is a multigenerational saga of life in the nineteenth-century French theater and one of my all-time favorites. I didn't like her others so well. Erika Holzer is another. An Eye for an Eye became a movie that starred Sally Field. Shelley Reuben writes mysteries that draw on her expertise in arson detection. In Weeping she gave her protagonist too many gratuitous foibles and self-doubts, as if she were straining to get out from under the Randian shadow.

I share the others' enthusiasm (in Nerian's link at #3) for Merwin and Webster. My favorite is Comrade John, available online. This, I suspect, is where Rand got the idea of architectural ghosting that figures in The Fountainhead.

Enjoy your readings.

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Are you really looking to be preached to? Most of us, when we pick a novel, are looking to be entertained.

Ah, but if you are entertained by novels with a crappy sense of life, then you are evil, evil, evil.

I once compiled an exhaustive list of non-Objectivist novels that we are permitted to enjoy. But I lost that Post-It note long ago.

If I sound jaded on this and similar topics relating to Objectivism and pleasure, that's because I am.

Ghs

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I recently read Shadows Live Under Seashells (recommended by Michael Marotta, thank you) which is very much in the Objectivist vein. It's a self-published work, so there's some common problems with it that you see with works that are not professionally edited. However, it's a great premise and mostly a good read.

The current craze in young adult dystopia is teeming with individualism, if not outright objectivism. If you can get into that, you'll probably find themes there with which you resonate.

A while back I read The Water Thief which is meant to be an argument against Objectivism, but since the author didn't really understand Objectivism (or outright purposely misinterprets it), it actually supports Objectivism, in my opinion.

Coming out of left field here, I'll recommend Gone With the Wind. That book is full of rationally self-interested people.

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Reidy- to understand someones ideals I have to learn what they believe, If I wanted to learn about communism I would read the communist manifesto. That being said I do read to be entertained but reading something that doesn't support what I believe wouldn't be entertaining. I just wanted to see if there are books that support her ideals about Objectivism because I would find them pleasurable to read. Thank you all for the suggestions, I think I have a lot of reading ahead of me.

Thanks,

David C.

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What about Mickey Spillane novels Rand recommended them.

Ba'al Chatzaf

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DC: You read - OK, I do - to understand more about life. A great writer, of whatever stripe, can put human existence across better than one's own experiences, at times. Read widely, there'll always be a protagonist, struggling and perhaps overcoming his situation. And if he fails, there is always something to take out. And if I assess the writer holds principles I oppose, I still have the enjoyable task of examining different nuances of his principles, contrasting, and trying to refute them. Don't be afraid of bad or immoral ideas, they won't instantly change yours.

(Somebody mentioned Goodkind, whose books I just can't finish - and I read anything. Too self-consciously and unoriginally Rand-like, I feel: Except, unlike her - with poor style, cut-out characters and so-so plots.)

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Heinlein is awesome, any Heinlein :)

Lately I've been reading Neal Stephenson very enjoyable. If you like sci fi and philo try his Anathem. I'm not sure if it can be explained, that guy has some imagination.

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tony garland- Thanks and I totally agree with you, I certainly not afraid to read books supporting ideas I don't agree with, I had to read Kant and John Dewey for my philosophy class so I know whats it like. I was just looking for books that are similar with her ideology because thats what I am interested in reading at the moment, thanks though your advise is still good! :)

Thanks,

David C.

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Tony, I'm with you on Goodkind. Blech!

I tried to read him once too after hearing Objectivists rave about what a great artist he is. Very quickly I thought, "Ah, I see, by 'great artist' they must mean that they like and agree with the content or 'message.'" Maybe someday I'll give it another shot.

J

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Here's an old thread from 2009 when we discussed Objectivism-friendly fiction. You have to get to post 23 or so before it starts becoming more informative.

Objectivist Fiction

And here's a post of mind I had forgotten about. I don't know why the McNally series is never referenced in Objectivist discussions. I believe it's the kind of fiction Rand would have written had she gone in the direction of "Good Copy." The sense of life--as demonstrated by the kind of character and writing--is practically identical.

If you want very light-hearted romantic novels (in the Objectivist sense of romantic), try any of the McNally books by Lawrence Sanders (for instance McNally's Gamble—and from what I just saw if you go to the link, these books are incredibly cheap on Amazon). It's been a long time since I have read a novel (I am even late on finishing Nicholas Dykes's wonderful book). I remember finding them delightful. When I get novel reading time again, I intend to reread a few.

On looking them up just now, I saw that the publisher continued the McNally franchise under Vincent Lardo after the death of Lawrence Sanders. I remember reading a McNally book by him and I do not recall any disappointment.

Even more fun for me was The Tenth Commandment by Sanders with the can-do nothing-gets-me-down 5'3" Joshua Bigg. This has been brushed aside by the world, but it is a real gem.

I believe with this line of fiction, Lawrence Sanders not only achieved the kind of thing Rand attempted with her short story, "Good Copy," he went further. He took the O. Henry spirit to the novel level.

His serious detective stuff is good, too, although his villains are usually pretty twisted.

Michael

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