My photography at Deviant Art


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What a wonderful shot.

Ellen wrote, “Congratulations both on the photo and on the escape from injury.”

There were two small herds of bison in Delaware a few years ago and I drove by them just to gawk. And at a local camp ground they keep two bison. Amazingly I have not heard of any critters escaping or hurting anyone. There may have been a sign at one herd that warned against feeding them. For a while beefalo meat, from a hybrid beef/bison, was being sold but I have not seen it recently. It tasted different from plain beef if I remember and was much leaner. It was OK but I think I would use it in a spaghetti sauce to mask some of the “difference.”

I wonder how big Ted Turner’s herds of buffalo are now? He wanted to repopulate the west. If Americans get hungry enough and there is not enough feed for cattle we may go back to eating bison because they can subsist on wild grass, get fat, and they do not need vet shots or medicines to keep them healthy.

Talking about eating them may be gross to some, so sorry to the naturists and vegetarians.

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Thank you all!

Yes they can live on about 1/3 of what it takes to feed domestic cattle. They are however very very susceptible to brucellosis and TB if they get crowded. As for the meat, yes it is very good for you in comparison to domestic cattle, what fat is in it isn't saturated fat. The other problem with domestication is they are very unpredictable and extra precautions are needed in handling them. (They spook easier and have short fuses.)

Lol Michael I see the resemblance!!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Stunning...another common bird for us on opposite coasts.

I assume telephoto because if you were stealth enough to get close enough for a macro we can form a religion!

Great shot.

It is an Oregon Junco, or Northern Junco. It occassionally strays so far east that it has been sighted along the Atlantic seaboard.

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Same lens, 120-300mm f2.8 sport. But the tripod and gimbal head have helped immensely. Far easier to take time with composition, and it frees up my other hand to make faster adjustments to ISO, aperture and the other settings. Plus more flexibility with being able to go with slower shutter speeds and sharper images. I'm getting a lot more "keeper" shots now.

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Jules,

If you can do such great pictures with birds, I wonder what you can do with nudes.

:smile:

(I'm damaged goods, so I have an excuse. :smile: )

Michael

I move the question and second.

Let's get this passed before the Puritans get back into the ethernet congress...

A...

Serious expert on Robert's Rules...

Heinlein goes into "meetings" and the rules in The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress...pretty much a primer on Rand, Libertarianism, Revolution and the fact that whomsoever controls space controls the Earth...

Pretty simple, "We will throw rocks, Man!"

Anyone want to be at ground zero by a baseball sized rock "thrown" from space?

I may not do math at a certain level, however, I sure understand the bottom of the gravity tunnel.

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http://jestephotography.deviantart.com/art/Junco-More-Snowww-448135032

Kicking it up a notch. This is one of the sharpest small bird close ups i have taken. It was overcast so lighting was not ideal but I am happy with the clarity.

Good job!

But I don't get the "It was overcast so lighting was not ideal" comment. My view is that overcast is generally the best lighting, and by far. It's basically a giant soft box, and therefore allows for so much more subtlety in values, colors and shadows. It's like using an airbrush in comparison to a sunny day's being like a pen and ink drawing. You get a histogram with a strong middle, and without your black and white limits clipping out. It's like naturally-existing high-quality HDRI without having to do the multiple exposures and selective melding.

J

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Yes mostly true however these birds were under a spruce tree so although it was nice there was not for the most part enough available light at all due to the heavy shade. In that spot more sun is better.

Also I usually only shoot that location with sideways light.

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http://jestephotography.deviantart.com/art/Junco-More-Snowww-448135032

Kicking it up a notch. This is one of the sharpest small bird close ups i have taken. It was overcast so lighting was not ideal but I am happy with the clarity.

Good job!

But I don't get the "It was overcast so lighting was not ideal" comment. My view is that overcast is generally the best lighting, and by far. It's basically a giant soft box, and therefore allows for so much more subtlety in values, colors and shadows. It's like using an airbrush in comparison to a sunny day's being like a pen and ink drawing. You get a histogram with a strong middle, and without your black and white limits clipping out. It's like naturally-existing high-quality HDRI without having to do the multiple exposures and selective melding.

J

I'm generally in agreement on "soft box" lighting, and use the same comparison you do, though this too has contexts. I don't find it best for small objects (or creatures) which are enlarged optically, since contrast is unappealingly flat in the subject. Great for portraits, of course. My favorite for a landscape is when it's illuminated my mostly soft overcast light, but with a small tear in the clouds sending rays through onto distant hills or trees. I've often tried to emulate that effect with product pictures in a proper studio soft box, I.e. diffuse light as main, with small touches of accent lighting.

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OFFICIAL WARNING TO ALL NATURE PHOTOGRAPHERS You could be next!!

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Could have been worse, could've been a rhino. Adam, that's Stephen Fry - an author/raconteur I enjoy!

Thks Tony - I have seen him before and would love to have few beers with him - fascinating individual.

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Hahah that's awesome! Btw that is an extremely rare endangered species!

Not a high survival rate for a stupid parrot that has carnal knowledge of the back of a human's head...

At any rate, when my friend in Ohio sent it to me, she knew that I would put it to good use.

I thought you and Tony would get a kick out of it.

Waiting on Jonathan.

A...

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You would think he would have at least skull f#%ked him in the ear!

You would think he would have at least skull f#%ked him in the ear!

Don't get me started, I promised to be on my good behavior from a different thread.

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Tad, I see it too. Don't know if its run its course by now.

Do you appreciate that understated, almost modest Brit humour? I do.

Can't say I like all their stand-up comedians (mm - a few) who can get quite coyly precious.

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