how you live affects your health...


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This highlights what I've been referring to about how many of our diseases are self inflicted by how we live.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-25303707

(emphasis mine)

Exercise 'significant role' in reducing risk of dementia, long-term study

Exercise throughout a person's life plays a significant role in reducing the risk of developing dementia, a study spanning 35 years has found.

The Cardiff University study following 2,235 men from Caerphilly, south Wales, found factors including diet and not smoking had an impact on preventing illnesses developing in older age.

However exercise had the single biggest influence on dementia levels.

Researchers stressed an overall healthy lifestyle was key to cutting disease.

The findings come just two days before a G8 summit on dementia, which is predicted will affect 135m people worldwide by 2050.

'Really amazed us'

The research by Cardiff University found the five factors that were integral to helping avoid disease were regular exercise, not smoking, low bodyweight, healthy diet and low alcohol intake.

Caerphilly Cohort Study

The study has followed a group of 2,235 men aged between 25 and 49 from Caerphilly, just north of Cardiff, since 1979.

It has recorded their behaviour in relation to their health over that period, initially focusing on the causes of heart disease, which was particularly high in the area.

As time has gone on, the study has moved to looking at the effects of dementia and strokes.

Over 400 research papers in the medical press have been produced from its findings.

One of the contributions was the discovery that aspirin helped prevent heart attacks.

The study has been funded by the Medical Research Council, the Alzheimer's Society and the British Heart Foundation.

People in the study who followed four of these had a 60% decline in dementia and cognitive decline rates, with exercise named as the strongest mitigating factor.

They also had 70% fewer instances of diabetes, heart disease and stroke, compared with people who followed none of the factors.

Professor Peter Elwood, who led the study on behalf of Cardiff School of Medicine, said healthy behaviour was far more beneficial than any medical treatment or preventative procedure.

"The size of reduction in the instance of disease owing to these simple healthy steps has really amazed us and is of enormous importance in an ageing population," he said.

"Taking up and following a healthy lifestyle is however the responsibility of the individual him or herself.

"Sadly, the evidence from this study shows that very few people follow a fully healthy lifestyle."

'More active lifestyle'

Prof Elwood stressed that while one aspect of the five strands of behaviour mentioned may have more impact on certain illnesses, the emphasis was on an overall healthy lifestyle.

"Exercise happens to be the most important but the other factors come in very close behind," he added.

He told BBC Wales while the recommended levels of exercise were half an hour five times a week, it did not mean having to go to a gym.

"We should all live a more active lifestyle. If I park my car a mile from work - that makes me likely to do more than the half an hour a day. Any exercise has some benefit and the more, the better."

The research showed that while smoking levels had dropped over the 35 years, the number of people leading what the team described as a fully healthy lifestyle had not changed.

"This study provides more evidence to show that healthy living could significantly reduce the chances of developing dementia." Dr Doug Brown

Alzheimer's Society

These findings are replicated across Wales, according to recent surveys, which showed less than 1% of the population have a fully healthy lifestyle, with 5% not following any of the five recommended points.

Prof Elwood added: "If the men had been urged to adopt just one additional healthy behaviour at the start of the study 35 years ago, and if only half of them complied, then during the ensuing 35 years there would have been a 13% reduction in dementia, a 12% drop in diabetes, 6% less vascular disease and a 5% reduction in deaths."

Dr Doug Brown from the Alzheimer's Society said: "'We have known for some time that what is good for your heart is also good for your head, and this study provides more evidence to show that healthy living could significantly reduce the chances of developing dementia.

'These large, longitudinal studies are expensive and complicated to run, but are essential to understand how dementia can be prevented."

The research team estimated that unhealthy living has accounted for around 10% of the NHS budget in Wales since the study began.

Health Minister Mark Drakeford said the study "threw into sharp relief" the extent to which preventing illness lay in a person's own hands.

The research is being published in the PLOS One journal.

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Mike,

Is that the best kettlebell training book?

I have one by Pavel called Enter the Kettlebell, but I have yet to get around to setting aside a few hours to go through it.

He tickled me with the section in the Introduction called "How the Kettlebell has Bred Weakness out of the Russian Gene Pool."

:)

I need a beginner routine. I bought a 20lb and a 35lb kettlebell, looked at some YouTube videos, but I have yet to establish a workout routine.

I have a feeling that once I get this thing structured and a habit formed, this will be with me for life.

Michael

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Michael,

I've had ETK for a few years, even given away a couple of copies. I've done the PM from ETK off and on for awhile, even tried ROP but haven't finished. I started with the 16Kg (35lb) bell. I think Pavel's new book and revised PM is better in a couple of ways plus the explanations of the movements in this book are very detailed. The best I've seen. Pavel is a genius and a master of strength and conditioning. I used to pick and choose this and that from his suggestions. Now, if he says it, I do it. For instance, I do the warm-up exactly as prescribed, the workout as prescribed and the stretches. I've learned to trust him, there's a reason for everything. I'm using the 20K KB for the swings and the 16K for the TGU now. You may be a bit bigger than I am (152 lbs) so I don't think you'll have any troubles with the 35 lb for the swings and the 20lb is a good start for the TGU's (after learning the movement with a sneaker!). A trick for learning the TGU is do it slowly with a cup half filled with water and don't spill the water! The exercises for learning the hip hinge: read it, do it. Training the deadlift, read it, do it. If the movements are done correctly you will never get hurt. Do them wrong: Danger! Danger! The advice about tension and breathing is important as well. Don't be in a hurry. Always respect any weight, barbell, kettlebell whatever. Imagine it's like a table saw running, if you don't pay attention it can cut off a bodypart. Back and shoulder problems can take months or years off your active body life. The kettlebell can make you bulletproof if done correctly.

I guess that was mostly a warning! Anyway, I love this workout (S and S). I've done it 6 times in the last 8 days. Last night I was feeling particularly good and put a lot into it. I get a pretty hard CNS hit from it (can barely crawl into bed) but recover well by the morning. I expect it to become routine in a few weeks. The only other thing I'm doing now is a half hour walk at lunch. Well, except for the odd set of pull-ups or push-ups.

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http://www.amazon.com/Kettlebell-Simple-Sinister-Pavel-Tsatsouline-ebook/dp/B00GF2HP9G/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1386693769&sr=1-1&keywords=simple+and+sinister

The best use of 1/2 hour/day you will ever find. Don't eat sugar or processed foods. You are alive until you decide not to be alive. Living death is worse than dead dead.

Mike... thanks so much for your excellent suggestion! :smile:

I watched Pavel on YouTube and was so impressed with his approach that I bought his book and picked up a kettlebell off of ebay.

Greg

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A doc friend of mine once told me: Old age needn't be a nightmare if you prepare for it. Get regular excercise & eat healthy.

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http://www.amazon.com/Kettlebell-Simple-Sinister-Pavel-Tsatsouline-ebook/dp/B00GF2HP9G/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1386693769&sr=1-1&keywords=simple+and+sinister

The best use of 1/2 hour/day you will ever find. Don't eat sugar or processed foods. You are alive until you decide not to be alive. Living death is worse than dead dead.

Mike... thanks so much for your excellent suggestion! :smile:

I watched Pavel on YouTube and was so impressed with his approach that I bought his book and picked up a kettlebell off of ebay.

Greg

Greg,

Cheers!

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A doc friend of mine once told me: Old age needn't be a nightmare if you prepare for it. Get regular excercise & eat healthy.

Also add no smoking and go easy on the booze. A glass of wine now and again is actually good for the health (especially red wine) but too much booze or beer is bad news.

I am now in my late seventies. If I had not quit smoking back in 1962 I would not be here to tell you that smoking is bad news.

Fire at man's fingertips is smoke in man's lungs. Not good.

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A doc friend of mine once told me: Old age needn't be a nightmare if you prepare for it. Get regular excercise & eat healthy.

When I heard the wake up call I was young. My Dad died at 50 of a heart attack. His brother died at 51 of a heart attack. And their sister died at 46 from cancer. This caused me to gradually change my course in life in the years that followed, as had I decided to prepare for old age just like the good advice your friend gave to you, by taking good care of my body with a simple lifestyle of a vegetarian diet, keeping active with work play and exercise, and absolutely no alcohol, dope, pot, or any pharmaceutical drugs.

There was also another decision which was just as important as all the rest. The choice to be happy. :smile: I love my wife. I love my job. I love my life. And in my mid sixties it's been almost 50 years now since I've taken so much as even one aspirin. So I can say by my own direct personal experience that this approach works for me.

Greg

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A doc friend of mine once told me: Old age needn't be a nightmare if you prepare for it. Get regular excercise & eat healthy.

When I heard the wake up call I was young. My Dad died at 50 of a heart attack. His brother died at 51 of a heart attack. And their sister died at 46 from cancer. This caused me to gradually change my course in life in the years that followed, as had I decided to prepare for old age just like the good advice your friend gave to you, by taking good care of my body with a simple lifestyle of a vegetarian diet, keeping active with work play and exercise, and absolutely no alcohol, dope, pot, or any pharmaceutical drugs.

There was also another decision which was just as important as all the rest. The choice to be happy. :smile: I love my wife. I love my job. I love my life. And in my mid sixties it's been almost 50 years now since I've taken so much as even one aspirin. So I can say by my own direct personal experience that this approach works for me.

Greg

I strongly suggest potassium supplementation. Durk Pearson and Sandy Shaw put out a product, doesn't cost much.

--Brant

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A doc friend of mine once told me: Old age needn't be a nightmare if you prepare for it. Get regular excercise & eat healthy.

When I heard the wake up call I was young. My Dad died at 50 of a heart attack. His brother died at 51 of a heart attack. And their sister died at 46 from cancer. This caused me to gradually change my course in life in the years that followed, as had I decided to prepare for old age just like the good advice your friend gave to you, by taking good care of my body with a simple lifestyle of a vegetarian diet, keeping active with work play and exercise, and absolutely no alcohol, dope, pot, or any pharmaceutical drugs.

There was also another decision which was just as important as all the rest. The choice to be happy. :smile: I love my wife. I love my job. I love my life. And in my mid sixties it's been almost 50 years now since I've taken so much as even one aspirin. So I can say by my own direct personal experience that this approach works for me.

Greg

I strongly suggest potassium supplementation. Durk Pearson and Sandy Shaw put out a product, doesn't cost much.

--Brant

Thanks for the suggestion, Brant, but that's not necessary because I have either bananas and avocados every day, and also peanuts. I'd rather simply eat foods with the supplements already in them. :wink:

Greg

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I strongly suggest potassium supplementation. Durk Pearson and Sandy Shaw put out a product, doesn't cost much.

--Brant

What's wrong with veggies? Veggies have lots of potassium. We need veggies anyway.

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I strongly suggest potassium supplementation. Durk Pearson and Sandy Shaw put out a product, doesn't cost much.

--Brant

What's wrong with veggies? Veggies have lots of potassium. We need veggies anyway.

Nothing. Eat away. However the man appears genetically programmed to have heart attacks. If I were I'd do more than eat bananas.

--Brant

not in my genes

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I strongly suggest potassium supplementation. Durk Pearson and Sandy Shaw put out a product, doesn't cost much.

--Brant

What's wrong with veggies? Veggies have lots of potassium. We need veggies anyway.

Nothing. Eat away. However the man appears genetically programmed to have heart attacks. If I were I'd do more than eat bananas.

--Brant

not in my genes

While that's true, my lifestyle doesn't include any of the behavioral risk enhancers (no alcohol, no smoking, no drugs, no meat, no high blood pressure, no high cholesterol, not obese, and not sedentary). When we get old enough we will all eventually die from something. However, being aware of how the self inflicted consequences of our own behavior can hasten death, I chose a simple approach of not doing what others do, and doing what others don't do.

Greg

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