public unions versus the public


Recommended Posts

one of my discomforts reading AS was the tunnel scene. I could not help feeling the described passengers were not just concretized abstracts, but representing real people Rand knew, and that she enjoyed killing them off fictionally.

You're definitely wrong. It's unavoidable that something like that had to happen in the story... it was about shit hitting the fan because of socialist policies. No matter what disaster she chose you could have said the same thing.

About right. C'mon Carol, admit it!

You gotta appreciate Rand's forbearance, she might've blasted an entire city. Not on, as the genuine innocents would have died...

Fun - writing your own fiction.

The tunnel scene was Xray's constant refrain, continued by Carol with a rather more delicate touch.

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Replies 336
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

lol I felt I owed it to Great-Uncle Whittaker.

Seriously, I do understand why that scene had to happen in the context of the novel. What I said was I felt the way I did - the sameway I felt when I read sdk's comment on his teacher's death, an animus towards individuals. That's all.

I would have italicized "felt" but editor is not working again. Sometimes it works but not often. What can I do it belongs to the Editors Union.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Teacher's Unions collapsing is ALWAYS good news.

Its like when I learned my high school Head Of House died in a car crash. The evil b**ch deserved it. I hope that the creature's death was slow and excruciatingly painful.

Anything that makes teachers-of-children suffer makes me happy (exception for Montessori teachers and Economics teachers).

Is that really happiness?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I read a post on here about a livable wage, which reminded me of a convo I had with a co-worker yesterday.

One of my co-workers mentioned to me that it's unfair that the corporation we work for doesn't pay us a living wage.

I was surprised because (1) I get paid a lot less than he does (he gets tips for pizza delivery and I don't, I'm a closing manager) and (2) I live decently with one roommate.

I asked him what a livable wage consists of, and he casually listed items like having a cell phone, cable, a car, at least a one-bedroom apartment if not a house, and good clothes. I have a prepaid phone from Walmart, no cable, I live in a smaller studio apartment with bunkbeds, and I wear work clothes more than any other type. I do have a car, though, which is used for commuting to my job 4 miles away.

In conclusion, "livable wage" = subjective. If you feel entitled to lots of luxuries, your "livable wage" will be what others consider a huge success. I live modestly because I'm relatively new to the job market, being 18 years old. It's unfortunate that more people don't understand that you can only demand a wage as high as your productivity.

$0.02

Link to post
Share on other sites

"Livable wage" is subjective, but the "living wage" that I was talking about is calculated by lowest average costs for housing and food for a single person, couple or family, such as are used in determining welfare rates.

People who struggle for a living wage know only too well that you can only get based on your boss's definition of productivity.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I read a post on here about a livable wage, which reminded me of a convo I had with a co-worker yesterday.

One of my co-workers mentioned to me that it's unfair that the corporation we work for doesn't pay us a living wage.

I was surprised because (1) I get paid a lot less than he does (he gets tips for pizza delivery and I don't, I'm a closing manager) and (2) I live decently with one roommate.

I asked him what a livable wage consists of, and he casually listed items like having a cell phone, cable, a car, at least a one-bedroom apartment if not a house, and good clothes. I have a prepaid phone from Walmart, no cable, I live in a smaller studio apartment with bunkbeds, and I wear work clothes more than any other type. I do have a car, though, which is used for commuting to my job 4 miles away.

In conclusion, "livable wage" = subjective. If you feel entitled to lots of luxuries, your "livable wage" will be what others consider a huge success. I live modestly because I'm relatively new to the job market, being 18 years old. It's unfortunate that more people don't understand that you can only demand a wage as high as your productivity.

$0.02

Your common sense is refreshing. Most people focus on income alone without realizing that the income can be increased by reducing their expenditures.

If you ever feel you're arriving at the point of growing beyond whatever work you are doing, I highly recommend harnessing that restlessness and dissatisfaction to motivate you to start your own small business on the side. Pick something useful that you truly love doing, and that can't be outsourced so that you always remain the sole indispensable ingredient of the product or service you provide to others. And once you get a taste of the freedom and adventure of assuming the risk of piloting your own boat after you've been pulling on an oar down in the hull of someone else's ship...

...you'll ~never~ go back.

Greg

Link to post
Share on other sites

I read a post on here about a livable wage, which reminded me of a convo I had with a co-worker yesterday.

One of my co-workers mentioned to me that it's unfair that the corporation we work for doesn't pay us a living wage.

I was surprised because (1) I get paid a lot less than he does (he gets tips for pizza delivery and I don't, I'm a closing manager) and (2) I live decently with one roommate.

I asked him what a livable wage consists of, and he casually listed items like having a cell phone, cable, a car, at least a one-bedroom apartment if not a house, and good clothes. I have a prepaid phone from Walmart, no cable, I live in a smaller studio apartment with bunkbeds, and I wear work clothes more than any other type. I do have a car, though, which is used for commuting to my job 4 miles away.

In conclusion, "livable wage" = subjective. If you feel entitled to lots of luxuries, your "livable wage" will be what others consider a huge success. I live modestly because I'm relatively new to the job market, being 18 years old. It's unfortunate that more people don't understand that you can only demand a wage as high as your productivity.

$0.02

Your common sense is refreshing. Most people focus on income alone without realizing that the income can be increased by reducing their expenditures.

If you ever feel you're arriving at the point of growing beyond whatever work you are doing, I highly recommend harnessing that restlessness and dissatisfaction to motivate you to start your own small business on the side. Pick something useful that you truly love doing, and that can't be outsourced so that you always remain the sole indispensable ingredient of the product or service you provide to others. And once you get a taste of the freedom and adventure of assuming the risk of piloting your own boat after you've been pulling on an oar down in the hull of someone else's ship...

...you'll ~never~ go back.

Greg

You forgot to mention that 90 percent of new start-ups go bust within two years. Starting your own business is a great idea if you are young and you can afford to go broke and try again. It is fun, but it is a very dicey proposition as well. All good things have an element of danger and risk. If one is going to try to go it alone he should understand the risks before he takes the long dive into the fray.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Since we've been talking about that James Altucher guy, here's a book he recommends:

http://www.amazon.com/Fantasy-Life-Outrageous-Uplifting-Heartbreaking/dp/1594486255/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1376013553&sr=8-1&keywords=fantasy+life

Fantasy Life, by Matthew Berry

A good line from it was, “doing something you don't care about kills you inside. And a lot of money won't change that.”

Link to post
Share on other sites

I read a post on here about a livable wage, which reminded me of a convo I had with a co-worker yesterday.

One of my co-workers mentioned to me that it's unfair that the corporation we work for doesn't pay us a living wage.

I was surprised because (1) I get paid a lot less than he does (he gets tips for pizza delivery and I don't, I'm a closing manager) and (2) I live decently with one roommate.

I asked him what a livable wage consists of, and he casually listed items like having a cell phone, cable, a car, at least a one-bedroom apartment if not a house, and good clothes. I have a prepaid phone from Walmart, no cable, I live in a smaller studio apartment with bunkbeds, and I wear work clothes more than any other type. I do have a car, though, which is used for commuting to my job 4 miles away.

In conclusion, "livable wage" = subjective. If you feel entitled to lots of luxuries, your "livable wage" will be what others consider a huge success. I live modestly because I'm relatively new to the job market, being 18 years old. It's unfortunate that more people don't understand that you can only demand a wage as high as your productivity.

$0.02

Indeed: "as high as your productivity" - and the business/industry/vocation you choose - and the state of the economy at the time - and, and...

After leaving home at 19, I was happy to be a lab assistant for the Atomic Energy Board for a year, then later a sales assistant in a men's clothing boutique, and then finally be taken on as staffer at a daily paper.

As long as I made it through the month - and salary was always tight - I hadn't a care in the world.

It was great to learn new skills and get around. It never crossed my mind that I marry any time soon. Or that I 'deserved' a new car, my own home, or children - which somebody had to pay for. (My fond memory is living on board my gf's cramped cabin cruiser in the Durban yacht mole).

No 'biggie' on my part, just how it was.

That "livable wage", apart from driving apart employer from employee, or abetting entitlement, creates a drone mentality too.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I read a post on here about a livable wage, which reminded me of a convo I had with a co-worker yesterday.

One of my co-workers mentioned to me that it's unfair that the corporation we work for doesn't pay us a living wage.

I was surprised because (1) I get paid a lot less than he does (he gets tips for pizza delivery and I don't, I'm a closing manager) and (2) I live decently with one roommate.

I asked him what a livable wage consists of, and he casually listed items like having a cell phone, cable, a car, at least a one-bedroom apartment if not a house, and good clothes. I have a prepaid phone from Walmart, no cable, I live in a smaller studio apartment with bunkbeds, and I wear work clothes more than any other type. I do have a car, though, which is used for commuting to my job 4 miles away.

In conclusion, "livable wage" = subjective. If you feel entitled to lots of luxuries, your "livable wage" will be what others consider a huge success. I live modestly because I'm relatively new to the job market, being 18 years old. It's unfortunate that more people don't understand that you can only demand a wage as high as your productivity.

$0.02

Your common sense is refreshing. Most people focus on income alone without realizing that the income can be increased by reducing their expenditures.

If you ever feel you're arriving at the point of growing beyond whatever work you are doing, I highly recommend harnessing that restlessness and dissatisfaction to motivate you to start your own small business on the side. Pick something useful that you truly love doing, and that can't be outsourced so that you always remain the sole indispensable ingredient of the product or service you provide to others. And once you get a taste of the freedom and adventure of assuming the risk of piloting your own boat after you've been pulling on an oar down in the hull of someone else's ship...

...you'll ~never~ go back.

Greg

You forgot to mention that 90 percent of new start-ups go bust within two years. Starting your own business is a great idea if you are young and you can afford to go broke and try again. It is fun, but it is a very dicey proposition as well. All good things have an element of danger and risk. If one is going to try to go it alone he should understand the risks before he takes the long dive into the fray.

Take the damn risk anyways. Life itself is an assumed risk. Start a business on a very small scale on the side while keeping your day job. Just be sure that what you choose to do is useful and practical. If you are competent and trustworthy...

...people will ~throw~ money at you.

And you're totally right...

My first business was a total failure, so I started another one that succeeds to this day, and I never have to worry about money for the rest of my life.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is vey heartening. Who threw the money at you to restart after your first business failed?

No one.

I've never needed to go into debt to start a business, because I used my own money that I saved up from work. What I mean by people "throwing money" at me is in fair, equitable, value for value exchanges for the useful goods and practical services I offer to them. American Capitalism is a beautiful thing.

They took a risk and obviously were rewarded handsomely.

No one else takes my risks. I take them myself, and I'm the one who gets the rewards.

(by the way... I both appreciate and enjoy your sarcasm. It's one of the finest forms of humor.)

Link to post
Share on other sites

So, you saved enough from work to pay off your costs from the bankruptcy and start up a new business, without bank loans or any injection of extra capital? I salute you.

If my comments come off as sarcastic, I am not writing well enough.

Link to post
Share on other sites

So, you saved enough from work to pay off your costs from the bankruptcy and start up a new business, without bank loans or any injection of extra capital? I salute you.

Yes. Bankruptcy for most failed businesses means a mountain of accumulated debt. But since I only operate on the principle of 100% solvency, even a business failure is not that drastic. It only means that it's time to go back to work and save up enough money to start another one. That took 3 years, and from what I learned from the first one, the second one made it.

There is a common misconception about Capitalism. Most people who claim to be Capitalists are in reality Creditists. Creditists believe the lie that credit is capital when it is actually the ~lack~ of capital. 2008 was only a collapse of the Creditist system, but not the Capitalist system.

If my comments come off as sarcastic, I am not writing well enough.

I'm nonetheless amused. ; )

Link to post
Share on other sites

Speaking of the public and the power of employees to quit, the Mayor of Toronto has just lost, or turfed, another member of his personal staff. That makes it 12 and counting, in a staff of 16.

Moreover his heretofore chief media cheerleader, the Toronto Sun, is now detailing the extensive Ford history of involvement with drug dealers and/or addicts, including a heroin-addicted sister and his brother and co-mayor who was a dealer in high school.

Colourful stuff. It does not look like his new Communications director has got off to a good start.

Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a common misconception about Capitalism. Most people who claim to be Capitalists are in reality Creditists. Creditists believe the lie that credit is capital when it is actually the ~lack~ of capital. 2008 was only a collapse of the Creditist system, but not the Capitalist system.

Greg,

We certainly agree on that.

Credit is not a capital asset. It's the illusion of asset. Used properly, it buys you time. If you use that time wisely, this is win-win all around. Used improperly (which is sooooooooo easy and tempting), it buys you hell.

Michael

Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a common misconception about Capitalism. Most people who claim to be Capitalists are in reality Creditists. Creditists believe the lie that credit is capital when it is actually the ~lack~ of capital. 2008 was only a collapse of the Creditist system, but not the Capitalist system.

Greg,

We certainly agree on that.

Credit is not a capital asset. It's the illusion of asset. Used properly, it buys you time. If you use that time wisely, this is win-win all around. Used improperly (which is sooooooooo easy and tempting), it buys you hell.

Michael

Credit, in a sense, is money transported from the future to the present.

Successful industries have been started on lines of credit. When the loans are paid off every cent thereafter is gravy to the people who borrowed the front money.

ruveyn

Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a common misconception about Capitalism. Most people who claim to be Capitalists are in reality Creditists. Creditists believe the lie that credit is capital when it is actually the ~lack~ of capital. 2008 was only a collapse of the Creditist system, but not the Capitalist system.

Greg,

We certainly agree on that.

Credit is not a capital asset. It's the illusion of asset.

It is. The events of 2008 were a inevitable return to fiscal reality from that fantasy, as the Creditists got the fleecing they deserved. My business remained unaffected because I didn't choose to participate in the charade. This is because there are actually two economic systems operating in America. One is real, while the other isn't. All my bets ride on the real one.

Link to post
Share on other sites

As I'm reading all this nonsense about unions, there is a sign over my desk "Unionize this." Been there for a while.

The stench blowing in from these stinking political winds has been in the air my entire adult working life, as has the obvious conclusion: "neither an employee nor employer be." I realized that in the late 70s. I am at the end of a now thirty year career practicing that. I was not, by far, the only person to have ever smelled the prevailing political winds and reached this same conclusion. The folks I did business with all over the world -- all hiding in plain sight -- were usually organized just like I was, most, like, me, without so much as a secretary.

Perhaps this realization by a fringe few -- by those who could -- hasn't had a significant impact on the nature of our economies; I don't know. I do know that for the last 30 years, I put my engineering degrees from Princeton and MIT to work in other than the normal tribal group cluster fuck tracks.

I know it hasn't been a problem for me --nor I suspect, for those I've done business with --in the least.

So unionize away...while you still can. I'll cheer. Maybe they will, too. Who knows?

Here's a toast to the unions.

Good luck to them. Wish them all the best.

And now...unionize this.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Take heart, your principled behaviour has had an impact on the economy. You and your co-thinkers have helped employers to shed employees, and potential workers to believe themselves independent and empowered, when in fact they are disadvantaged .

Great job!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Moralist, just curious - do acquaintances in real life ever describe you as "smug"?

Moralist's smug beggars description.

Disproportionate pride goeth before a fall.

Link to post
Share on other sites

PS Are you the Fred Bartlett Roofing and Siding? Looks like a good company, I would hire you. Serious. Not many roofers and siders hire union labour, even here. Actually, none of them do that I know of.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now