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Here is a video of one of Glenn's most inspiring moments. He talks about being true to your conscience.

He frames it in Christian terms because he was asked a question in Christian terms by a college student. But his argument, with a few small adjustments, could just as easily serve for any moral person.

This guy is a hell of a speaker...

Michael

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Beck can certainly monologue. I didn't think this was one of his best, but it was still good and the lesson was great.

He does often cry during his monologues. It reminds me of a skit where John Stewart (I believe) impersonates Beck during one of his monologues. In the skit, Stewart mocks Beck, implies he is a crazy conspiracy theorist, and ridicules his behavior (mock crying and such).

I like Beck. I think his tears are an indication of what extent he cares about ideas. He is dramatic and passionate. He says what he means and means what he says (as the cliche goes). I prefer him immensely to the pompous, sneering John Stewart and his kind.

Hmm, are the prominent personalities on the Right (Hannity, Limbaugh, Palin, Savage, Beck) of a more serious stripe than the prominent personalities on the Left (Colbert, Stewart, Leno, Kimmel)? If so, why is this? Is it (sincerity) simply the result of differing philosophies? Does the Right take ideas more seriously than the Left?

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I like Beck. I think his tears are an indication of what extent he cares about ideas. He is dramatic and passionate. He says what he means and means what he says (as the cliche goes). I prefer him immensely to the pompous, sneering John Stewart and his kind.

Hmm, are the prominent personalities on the Right (Hannity, Limbaugh, Palin, Savage, Beck) of a more serious stripe than the prominent personalities on the Left (Colbert, Stewart, Leno, Kimmel)? If so, why is this? Is it (sincerity) simply the result of differing philosophies? Does the Right take ideas more seriously than the Left?

I'm not really a fan of any of the above entertainers, and it's important to remember that's what they are - entertainers. Some are more ideologically offensive than others (Beck the least so, in my opinion), but they all suffer from a lot of theatrics and little substance - poor content to playtime ratio for my own tastes. I generally enjoy programs like EconTalk because they are jam-packed with information and interesting viewpoints, and the back-and-forth interview format is a more "human" experience for the listener. Perhaps it's a sign of adult-onset ADHD that I can't listen to a 5+ minute monologue from anyone without shifting uncomfortably in my seat and looking toward my watch desperately for some relief. When I noticed the above segment was a bit over seven minutes in length, that was almost enough in itself to turn me away from it. Watching an hour-or-more pundit program would be one of the most brutal tortures I could envision for my psyche.

My real problem with Stewart, in particular, is that he gleefully operates within an unwarranted double standard. He relentlessly attacks his fellow news-format entertainers, then takes umbrage when they return fire on the basis that he is a "comedian" and thus beyond reproach. Since he's an admitted socialist and regularly works his political views into his program, I don't see how he is in effect any different from a Limbaugh or a Savage who are providing the same entertainment value to their audiences.

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Beck is a great and good man. I have admired him for almost ten (10) years.

We are in a time where men and women must stand up and be clear about their opposition to the growing tyranny.

A...

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Won't be easy. Too many are not opposed to tyrany - for the sake of safety. Given the choice, the majority will pick safety. The government must protect us from all and every thing.

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Robert Baratheon, on 02 Jun 2013 - 10:02 AM, said:

Reminds me of one of my favorite movies:

Mine too. However it was historically inaccurate. Thomas More consigned many a heretic to the flames (quite literally). He was an arch-Catholic and did many a terrible thing in the name of the Church.

The way the movie portrayed him, it made Thomas More out to be a classical liberal and an upright law abiding citizen.

Ba'al Chatzaf

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Baal - I like the movie not for any historical accuracy but for the broader "human truths" that can be found within it. Much the same reason I like George R.R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire (Game of Thrones) series (it's not really about the dragons) and George Orwell's Animal Farm (it's not really about the animals).

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  • 4 weeks later...

Baal - I like the movie not for any historical accuracy but for the broader "human truths" that can be found within it. Much the same reason I like George R.R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire (Game of Thrones) series (it's not really about the dragons) and George Orwell's Animal Farm (it's not really about the animals).

More's peroration on Law was worth the price of the entire movie.

Ba'al Chatzaf

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  • 2 weeks later...

Here is a video of one of Glenn's most inspiring moments. He talks about being true to your conscience.

He frames it in Christian terms because he was asked a question in Christian terms by a college student. But his argument, with a few small adjustments, could just as easily serve for any moral person.

This guy is a hell of a speaker...

Michael

God bless Glenn.

He puts his influence to good use.

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