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Governor Scott Walker Should Be Running For President...

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Morning Bell: Governor Walker Breaks New Ground in Higher Ed

Lindsey Burke and Teresa Shumay

July 5, 2012 at 8:37 am

Governor Scott Walker (R-WI), already well known for his efforts to curb union power, has now set out to tackle an equally big task: busting the higher education bubble.

The problem of college affordability is recognized on both sides of the aisle, but sadly, most efforts to abate the problem – such as increasing federal subsidies – have only exacerbated it. Walker wants to try a different approach for taxpayers and students in his state.

Last Tuesday, Walker released his proposal to create the University of Wisconsin Flexible Degree Program, a competency-based approach using both on line learning and traditional college courses. He explained:

This unique competency-based model will allow students to start classes anytime they like, work at their own pace, and earn credit for what they already know… Students can use knowledge obtained on the job, through free open courseware, or anywhere else to quickly test out of a module or a course. A student may move ahead as soon as he or she can prove content mastery.

Obtaining a degree through the University of Wisconsin system will now be more affordable and customizable. By tapping into and giving credit for the knowledge a student has obtained outside the classroom or through another school, the Flexible Degree Program brings down the cost and the time required to graduate. If a student proves his mastery of a certain subject, he can obtain credit without taking a full class. Walker’s office notes:

Students can demonstrate college-level competencies – no matter where they learned the material – as soon as they can prove that they know it…

Rather than molding coursework around a set time frame, these modules can be designed to contain only the knowledge required within a specific competency. This could benefit working adults who need to start and pause their studies because of work and personal commitments. It could also benefit highly motivated students who are able to move through course materials at a faster pace.

Courses in this new program will be based on competency, not seat time, so students can move on to the next topic when they have mastered the current material. Students will have broad access to high quality coursework and student services, and they can graduate as soon as they can prove their mastery of the material…

Students with extensive knowledge from the workplace, free open courseware, or other life experiences will be able to quickly move closer to degree completion by having their knowledge assessed and credited.

The classes can also be tailored to allow for a student’s busy schedule or career goals. What’s more, Walker expects the program to reach even international students, broadening the university’s student and revenue base.

Governor Walker, as was the case with his efforts to curb union influence and empower teachers, is on the cutting edge of a higher education revolution. As Heritage’s Stuart Butler notes:

In as little as a decade, most colleges and universities could look very different from their present forms – with the cost of a college credential plummeting even as the quality of instruction rises.

If this transformation does come to pass, it could have profound and beneficial implications. It could significantly increase the international competitiveness of American workers in a world in which we need higher skills and productivity to compete. It could sharply improve the employability of those on the bottom rungs of America’s income ladder, giving them the tools they need to move up. And it could do much to restore the American Dream for those who have begun to believe that opportunity in this country is disappearing. In other words, such a change could hardly come too soon.

Walker’s plan is a real solution to the problem of college affordability, cutting costs for the student and the taxpayer. The first-in-the-nation Flexible Degree Program is a great step toward giving all students their chance at the American Dream.

============================================

Now this is a politician that I can support...loved the way he handled the last issue. He has balls and he keeps it simple and it works.

Adam

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All in due time.

I saw an op-ed piece recently which pointed out that the Republican stars are young as politicians go, with careers ahead of them: Walker, Rubio, Daniels, Jindal, Paul. The Democrats, by contrast, don't have much in the pipeline. Clinton will be 69 by the next election and Biden will turn 74 later that month. Warren, whom some consider the next big thing, is 63 and has never won an election. Weiner and Wasserman-Schultz were supposed to be rising stars, but for varying reasons they didn't work out.

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Morning Bell: Governor Walker Breaks New Ground in Higher Ed

Lindsey Burke and Teresa Shumay

July 5, 2012 at 8:37 am

Governor Scott Walker (R-WI), already well known for his efforts to curb union power, has now set out to tackle an equally big task: busting the higher education bubble.

The problem of college affordability is recognized on both sides of the aisle, but sadly, most efforts to abate the problem – such as increasing federal subsidies – have only exacerbated it. Walker wants to try a different approach for taxpayers and students in his state.

Last Tuesday, Walker released his proposal to create the University of Wisconsin Flexible Degree Program, a competency-based approach using both on line learning and traditional college courses. He explained:

This unique competency-based model will allow students to start classes anytime they like, work at their own pace, and earn credit for what they already know… Students can use knowledge obtained on the job, through free open courseware, or anywhere else to quickly test out of a module or a course. A student may move ahead as soon as he or she can prove content mastery.

Obtaining a degree through the University of Wisconsin system will now be more affordable and customizable. By tapping into and giving credit for the knowledge a student has obtained outside the classroom or through another school, the Flexible Degree Program brings down the cost and the time required to graduate. If a student proves his mastery of a certain subject, he can obtain credit without taking a full class. Walker’s office notes:

Students can demonstrate college-level competencies – no matter where they learned the material – as soon as they can prove that they know it…

Rather than molding coursework around a set time frame, these modules can be designed to contain only the knowledge required within a specific competency. This could benefit working adults who need to start and pause their studies because of work and personal commitments. It could also benefit highly motivated students who are able to move through course materials at a faster pace.

Courses in this new program will be based on competency, not seat time, so students can move on to the next topic when they have mastered the current material. Students will have broad access to high quality coursework and student services, and they can graduate as soon as they can prove their mastery of the material…

Students with extensive knowledge from the workplace, free open courseware, or other life experiences will be able to quickly move closer to degree completion by having their knowledge assessed and credited.

The classes can also be tailored to allow for a student’s busy schedule or career goals. What’s more, Walker expects the program to reach even international students, broadening the university’s student and revenue base.

Governor Walker, as was the case with his efforts to curb union influence and empower teachers, is on the cutting edge of a higher education revolution. As Heritage’s Stuart Butler notes:

In as little as a decade, most colleges and universities could look very different from their present forms – with the cost of a college credential plummeting even as the quality of instruction rises.

If this transformation does come to pass, it could have profound and beneficial implications. It could significantly increase the international competitiveness of American workers in a world in which we need higher skills and productivity to compete. It could sharply improve the employability of those on the bottom rungs of America’s income ladder, giving them the tools they need to move up. And it could do much to restore the American Dream for those who have begun to believe that opportunity in this country is disappearing. In other words, such a change could hardly come too soon.

Walker’s plan is a real solution to the problem of college affordability, cutting costs for the student and the taxpayer. The first-in-the-nation Flexible Degree Program is a great step toward giving all students their chance at the American Dream.

============================================

Now this is a politician that I can support...loved the way he handled the last issue. He has balls and he keeps it simple and it works.

Adam

Yes indeed...

(83% of units reporting)

✔Scott Walker ®, inc. — 1,043,023

Mary Burke (D) — 910,012

When the governor took office in January 2011, he faced a projected budget shortfall of $3 billion over the following two years — a challenge that could have blocked tax cuts. It didn't. With Republican lawmakers, Walker has passed several rounds of tax cuts adding up to more than $1.9 billion from July 2011 to June 2015.

To make those tax cuts possible, the governor and his allies in the Legislature cut state aid to schools by nearly $800 million in the 2011-'13 budget. Those state cuts to schools were the largest in the nation that year, though they still left per-pupil school funding in Wisconsin 7% above the national average.

Walker expanded taxpayer-funded private voucher schools out of Milwaukee, first to Racine and then later statewide. In his next budget, he wants to lift or simply eliminate the 1,000-student cap on the statewide vouchers program.

http://www.jsonline.com/news/statepolitics/walkers-burkes-political-futures-hang-in-balance-with-vote-b99382151z1-281512301.html

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I have always liked Kasich - great story about how he shook every hand of every voter in his firstt victory which I believe came in the Gingrich wave of 1994.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich established himself as a serious contender after he easily won reelection Tuesday in a quadrennial swing state, as did Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, whose commanding win — his third in four years — strengthened his claim to top-tier status.

And, of course, Scott Walker.

Both states are ritical to the 2016 electoral map.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/gop-presidential-hopefuls-jockey-for-position-in-a-crowded-2016-field/2014/11/08/da41466e-66b5-11e4-bb14-4cfea1e742d5_story.html

A...

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the 69yo is all the Dems have. Might be enough.

--Brant

Don/t think so Brant.

Everybody keeps asking me, “Why did this happen?’

Beats me. When it came to the elections, I was a dreamer who thought the Democrats were going to retain the Senate. Instead, we got walloped.

I didn’t realize any one person could be as hated across the nation as Barack Obama. Or that someone who had risen so far in politics could have so few friends, even within his own party.

Mostly, the Democrats who were on the ballot away ran from Obama. It couldn’t have gone any worse if they’d run into his arms — at least that might have energized the Democratic base a bit. After all, the guy did manage to get elected to the highest office in the land, twice.

http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/williesworld/article/Don-t-say-Obama-s-blocking-caused-5879675.php

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Adam, if there's an economic calamity that can be blamed on the Republicans before the next election it could be enough to make a difference. Failure to raise the debt ceiling in March might be such a trigger, for if it is allowed to stick 1/2 a trillion bucks won't be spent into the private sector. That'd be a contraction of 1/16 of the economy out the gate. The Republicans should be very careful about being busy, busy, busy. If they appear to be too much in control at the expense of the executive branch the citizenry might turn on them instead. They have to do something, however, in fact they have to do a lot. It's going to be their conundrum for the next two years.

--Brant

I'd bet, however, that the Republicans will win in 2016 with retaining the Senate more problematic than winning the Presidency

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Adam, if there's an economic calamity that can be blamed on the Republicans before the next election it could be enough to make a difference. Failure to raise the debt ceiling in March might be such a trigger, for if it is allowed to stick 1/2 a trillion bucks won't be spent into the private sector. That'd be a contraction of 1/16 of the economy out the gate. The Republicans should be very careful about being busy, busy, busy. If they appear to be too much in control at the expense of the executive branch the citizenry might turn on them instead. They have to do something, however, in fact they have to do a lot. It's going to be their conundrum for the next two years.

--Brant

I'd bet, however, that the Republicans will win in 2016 with retaining the Senate more problematic than winning the Presidency

On that other thread about the "danger" part of the next two (2) years, your scenario is more than possible.

This AG advise and consent issue is going to be a litmus test.

They would be fools to have a lame duck appointment of a critical office like this would be:

1) insane;

2) completely breakin with precedent[ and

3) insanedid I mention insane?

A...

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All in due time.

I saw an op-ed piece recently which pointed out that the Republican stars are young as politicians go, with careers ahead of them: Walker, Rubio, Daniels, Jindal, Paul. The Democrats, by contrast, don't have much in the pipeline. Clinton will be 69 by the next election and Biden will turn 74 later that month. Warren, whom some consider the next big thing, is 63 and has never won an election. Weiner and Wasserman-Schultz were supposed to be rising stars, but for varying reasons they didn't work out.

I like what Scott has done as Governor in addition to the others you mentioned. He does however, speak with little emotion, especially enthusiasm...from what I've seen & heard. Reminds me of Gary Cooper in The Fountainhead...but that's another story.

Paul, with Rubio as his wingman would get my vote.

-J

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All in due time.

I saw an op-ed piece recently which pointed out that the Republican stars are young as politicians go, with careers ahead of them: Walker, Rubio, Daniels, Jindal, Paul. The Democrats, by contrast, don't have much in the pipeline. Clinton will be 69 by the next election and Biden will turn 74 later that month. Warren, whom some consider the next big thing, is 63 and has never won an election. Weiner and Wasserman-Schultz were supposed to be rising stars, but for varying reasons they didn't work out.

I like what Scott has done as Governor in addition to the others you mentioned. He does however, speak with little emotion, especially enthusiasm...from what I've seen & heard. Reminds me of Gary Cooper in The Fountainhead...but that's another story.

Paul, with Rubio as his wingman would get my vote.

-J

Hate to play Presidential electoral tactics and strategy, however that is too male, too white and too young for it to work.

A...

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I like the guy, and I like the way he thinks about education, but he isn't really breaking new ground. The College Level Examination Program has been around for at least two and a half decades.

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I like the guy, and I like the way he thinks about education, but he isn't really breaking new ground. The College Level Examination Program has been around for at least two and a half decades.

http://clep.collegeboard.org/

For those who are unfamiliar with CLEP <<<< damn don't spell that acronym wrong!

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I like the guy, and I like the way he thinks about education, but he isn't really breaking new ground. The College Level Examination Program has been around for at least two and a half decades.

http://clep.collegeboard.org/

For those who are unfamiliar with CLEP <<<< damn don't spell that acronym wrong!

There's a reason I spelled out the entire name of the program. LOL!

Unfamiliarity is the issue. I'm always amazed by the number of people who are unaware that the CLEP exists, even high school students whose guidance counselors really ought to be informing them. Anyone of any age who is attending, entering, or returning to college can take these exams (on a multitude of subjects) and get credit at many colleges if they score well enough. Between CLEP and my advanced placement courses, I tested out of two semesters worth of classes back in the day.

Again, I'm not trying to devalue what Scott is doing. I'm just saying that competency-based college credit is not a totally new idea, and you don't have to attend that particular school or wait for new legislation to take advantage of it.

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I like the guy, and I like the way he thinks about education, but he isn't really breaking new ground. The College Level Examination Program has been around for at least two and a half decades.

http://clep.collegeboard.org/

For those who are unfamiliar with CLEP <<<< damn don't spell that acronym wrong!

There's a reason I spelled out the entire name of the program. LOL!

Unfamiliarity is the issue. I'm always amazed by the number of people who are unaware that the CLEP exists, even high school students whose guidance counselors really ought to be informing them. Anyone of any age who is attending, entering, or returning to college can take these exams (on a multitude of subjects) and get credit at many colleges if they score well enough. Between CLEP and my advanced placement courses, I tested out of two semesters worth of classes back in the day.

Again, I'm not trying to devalue what Scott is doing. I'm just saying that competency-based college credit is not a totally new idea, and you don't have to attend that particular school or wait for new legislation to take advantage of it.

DD:

Yes, spelling it our sure helps avoid a major social media oops!

By the way, thanks for reminding me about how extensive these programs are.

I had gotten a lot rusty on that program.

I put up the link because it is such a valuable asset for the individual to have in their arsenal.

Hell, they would probably send George S. a box of degrees and a check!

A...

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I like the guy, and I like the way he thinks about education, but he isn't really breaking new ground. The College Level Examination Program has been around for at least two and a half decades.

http://clep.collegeboard.org/

For those who are unfamiliar with CLEP <<<< damn don't spell that acronym wrong!

There's a reason I spelled out the entire name of the program. LOL!

Unfamiliarity is the issue. I'm always amazed by the number of people who are unaware that the CLEP exists, even high school students whose guidance counselors really ought to be informing them. Anyone of any age who is attending, entering, or returning to college can take these exams (on a multitude of subjects) and get credit at many colleges if they score well enough. Between CLEP and my advanced placement courses, I tested out of two semesters worth of classes back in the day.

Again, I'm not trying to devalue what Scott is doing. I'm just saying that competency-based college credit is not a totally new idea, and you don't have to attend that particular school or wait for new legislation to take advantage of it.

DD:

Yes, spelling it our sure helps avoid a major social media oops!

By the way, thanks for reminding me about how extensive these programs are.

I had gotten a lot rusty on that program.

I put up the link because it is such a valuable asset for the individual to have in their arsenal.

Hell, they would probably send George S. a box of degrees and a check!

A...

Adam:

Sorry to hear your CLEP had gotten rusty. I believe there are lubricants that can help avoid this problem. :laugh:

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Adam:

Sorry to hear your CLEP had gotten rusty. I believe there are lubricants that can help avoid this problem. :laugh:

You are sooo bad...lol.

What WD-69?

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All in due time.

I saw an op-ed piece recently which pointed out that the Republican stars are young as politicians go, with careers ahead of them: Walker, Rubio, Daniels, Jindal, Paul. The Democrats, by contrast, don't have much in the pipeline. Clinton will be 69 by the next election and Biden will turn 74 later that month. Warren, whom some consider the next big thing, is 63 and has never won an election. Weiner and Wasserman-Schultz were supposed to be rising stars, but for varying reasons they didn't work out.

I like what Scott has done as Governor in addition to the others you mentioned. He does however, speak with little emotion, especially enthusiasm...from what I've seen & heard. Reminds me of Gary Cooper in The Fountainhead...but that's another story.

Paul, with Rubio as his wingman would get my vote.

-J

Hate to play Presidential electoral tactics and strategy, however that is too male, too white and too young for it to work.

A...

Adam,

Who, at this stage, would you like to see as Repub. President & VP candidates.

My Denver... still in the running.

And you took the hit like Joe Willie.

-Joe

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All in due time.

I saw an op-ed piece recently which pointed out that the Republican stars are young as politicians go, with careers ahead of them: Walker, Rubio, Daniels, Jindal, Paul. The Democrats, by contrast, don't have much in the pipeline. Clinton will be 69 by the next election and Biden will turn 74 later that month. Warren, whom some consider the next big thing, is 63 and has never won an election. Weiner and Wasserman-Schultz were supposed to be rising stars, but for varying reasons they didn't work out.

I like what Scott has done as Governor in addition to the others you mentioned. He does however, speak with little emotion, especially enthusiasm...from what I've seen & heard. Reminds me of Gary Cooper in The Fountainhead...but that's another story.

Paul, with Rubio as his wingman would get my vote.

-J

Hate to play Presidential electoral tactics and strategy, however that is too male, too white and too young for it to work.

A...

Adam,

Who, at this stage, would you like to see as Repub. President & VP candidates.

My Denver... still in the running.

And you took the hit like Joe Willie.

-Joe

Walker - Martinez works real well for me.

She is a conservative Latina...

She is the first woman to be elected Governor of New Mexico and the first Hispanic female governor in the United States.[2][3][4] In 2013, she was named one of Time magazine's 100 most influential people in the world.[5]

She is Mexican and ...

On September 9, 2011, Martinez stated she did not know whether her paternal grandparents immigrated to the country illegally.[11] After more thorough research it turned out that they appeared to follow the rules at the time and that she is a great-granddaughter of Mexican Revolutionary General Toribio Ortega.[12] On November 14, 2011, Martinez visited Cuchillo Parado, Mexico, for a celebration in honor of her great grandfather, "a revolutionary general who led a band of supporters credited as being the first to take up arms on Nov. 14, 1910 against a decades-long dictator".[12]

Theres's more...

Polling and opinion[edit]

Martinez has one of the highest approval rating of current governors in the United States, according to a Public Opinion Strategies survey, conducted for Martinez's campaign.[28] Her approval ratings have not dropped below 60% in her tenure as governor.[29][30][31][32] In an April 2012 edition of the Washington Post, Martinez was named 8th most popular governor in the United States.[33]

As of May 2013, Martinez had an approval rating of 66%,[34][35] with more than 44% of New Mexico's Democrats stating they approve of her.[36]

A January 2014 poll conducted by Research and Polling Inc., an Albuquerque-based pollster, on behalf of Common Cause New Mexico pegged Martinez's approval rating at 55 percent.[37]

Yeah baby, let's get ethnical...rhymes with a song...

A...

just one interesting duet

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Walker in Iowa...Field of Libertarian Dreams?

DES MOINES, Iowa — Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker ® delivered a fiery speech in Iowa on Saturday, wowing the conservative crowd with a passionate argument for small government and his own lengthy resume.

The Wisconsin governor, in rolled-up shirtsleeves, paced the stage as he blasted big government and touted a long list of conservative reforms he's pushed through in blue Wisconsin.

The governor also showed a rhetorical flourish that's largely been absent from his previous campaigns, drawing the crowd to its feet multiple times.

"There's a reason we take a day off to celebrate the 4th of July and not the 15th of April," he said, almost yelling as his voice grew hoarse. "Because in America we value our independence from the government, not our dependence on it."

http://thehill.com/blogs/ballot-box/presidential-races/230636-walker-shows-fire-in-iowa

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If we could lose Trump, Huckabee, Romney, Bush & a few other middle of the road RINOS the stage could be set for Paul, Cruz, Palin, Walker & Rubio.

Those five would be a formidable bunch on the stage @ the Republican primary.

-J

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If we could lose Trump, Huckabee, Romney, Bush & a few other middle of the road RINOS the stage could be set for Paul, Cruz, Palin, Walker & Rubio.

Those five would be a formidable bunch on the stage @ the Republican primary.

-J

Hmmm maybe we could set up a hydra headed executive ...

This was a major debate in those hot summer months in Philadelphia, several iterations from 2 - 3 headed executive. Again, their brilliant revolutionary concept of natural or God given individual rights propelled them to seek a way to dissipate power, even within that most feared branch, the executive.

A...

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A hydra headed executive? ROTFLMAO, big time. Go for it!

-J

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Non Hydra headed executive Scott Walker cuts first ad.

So what is this about him being an undynamic speaker again?

My understanding is that he did not graduate from college...another plus.

A...

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It would be nice having him on the ticket, in contrast to the wicked witch Hillary.

-J

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I heard this guy being interviewed on Sean Hannity's radio show the other day. He sounded like a hack, simpleton, and sleazy con-artist. Very inferior in mind and spirit to Rand Paul and Ted Cruz.

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