Recommended Posts

From the website 3ders.org, an amazing story of a titanium + 'bioceramic' lower jaw built up in a 3D printer and implanted as a replacement ... I had thought 3D printing was far advanced already, but this is remarkable. My pre-valentines gift to OL friends ...

Feb.3, 2012

lower-jaw-3d-printed.pngThe University of Hasselt (Belgium) announced today that Belgian and Dutch scientists have successfully replacing a lower jaw with a 3D printed model for a 83 year-old woman. According to the researchers, It is the first custom-made implant in the world to replace an entire lower jaw.

The lower jaw of the elderly woman was badly infected and needed to be removed. Considering the age of the patient, a "classical" microsurgical reconstructive surgery takes too long time and can be risky. Therefore a tailor-made implant is the best choice.

Normally it takes a few days to produce a custom implant, but with 3D printing technology it takes only a few hours.

This development is led by Research Institute BIOMED at Hasselt University, in collaboration with surgeons from the Netherlands, including the Orbis Centre in Sittard-Geleen, Xilloc Medical BV, Maastricht and Cam bioceramics BV in Leiden.

The 3D printer prints titanium powder layer by layer, while a computer controlled laser ensures that the correct particles are fused together. Using 3D printing technology, less materials are needed and the production time is much shorter than traditional manufacturing. The mandible was finally given a bioceramic coating compatible with the patient's tissue by BioCeramics in Leiden. The artificial jaw weighs 107 grams, it is only 30 grams heavier than a natural jaw, but the patient can easily get used to it.

The operation was performed in June last year in the hospital in Sittard-Geleen. One day later the lady could start talking and swallowing.

[The rest of the story here]

Link to post
Share on other sites
From the website 3ders.org, an amazing story of a titanium + 'bioceramic' lower jaw built up in a 3D printer and implanted as a replacement ... I had thought 3D printing was far advanced already, but this is remarkable. My pre-valentines gift to OL friends ...
Feb.3, 2012 lower-jaw-3d-printed.pngThe University of Hasselt (Belgium) announced today that Belgian and Dutch scientists have successfully replacing a lower jaw with a 3D printed model for a 83 year-old woman. According to the researchers, It is the first custom-made implant in the world to replace an entire lower jaw. The lower jaw of the elderly woman was badly infected and needed to be removed. Considering the age of the patient, a "classical" microsurgical reconstructive surgery takes too long time and can be risky. Therefore a tailor-made implant is the best choice. Normally it takes a few days to produce a custom implant, but with 3D printing technology it takes only a few hours. This development is led by Research Institute BIOMED at Hasselt University, in collaboration with surgeons from the Netherlands, including the Orbis Centre in Sittard-Geleen, Xilloc Medical BV, Maastricht and Cam bioceramics BV in Leiden. The 3D printer prints titanium powder layer by layer, while a computer controlled laser ensures that the correct particles are fused together. Using 3D printing technology, less materials are needed and the production time is much shorter than traditional manufacturing. The mandible was finally given a bioceramic coating compatible with the patient's tissue by BioCeramics in Leiden. The artificial jaw weighs 107 grams, it is only 30 grams heavier than a natural jaw, but the patient can easily get used to it. The operation was performed in June last year in the hospital in Sittard-Geleen. One day later the lady could start talking and swallowing. [The rest of the story here]

Another story showing how it is a small world:

Dr. Carl Deckard invented this material forming techique:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selective_laser_sintering

I went to school with him one summer when I was 17 at Drake university for

a NSF sponsored physics summer camp.

Dennis

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now