dennislmay

More Problems for the General Theory of Relativity

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Clumpiness of Distant Universe Surprises Astronomers

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2011/06/clumpy-universe/

or tinyurl version:

http://tinyurl.com/4x5htat

General Relatvity fails on the scale of spiral galaxies

and now it is seen to fail on the largest scales yet

observed.

Adding more and more fixes like Dark Matter didn't work

on the scale of spiral galaxies and now the fix of Dark

Energy can't fix these larger scale observations.

A new model of gravity is needed. An indefinitely old

universe has no problem with clumpiness on large scales.

Dennis

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Clumpiness of Distant Universe Surprises Astronomers

http://www.wired.com...lumpy-universe/

or tinyurl version:

http://tinyurl.com/4x5htat

General Relatvity fails on the scale of spiral galaxies

and now it is seen to fail on the largest scales yet

observed.

Adding more and more fixes like Dark Matter didn't work

on the scale of spiral galaxies and now the fix of Dark

Energy can't fix these larger scale observations.

A new model of gravity is needed. An indefinitely old

universe has no problem with clumpiness on large scales.

Dennis

This has been apparent for decades. GTR will not mix with successful physical theories of the very small. Eventually it will have to be replaced (as soon as a replacement can be created). Einstein himself believed in a stable eternal cosmos, not one that expanded from a small region.

Some theories of an eternal cosmos are making a comeback. In the Steinhardt-Turok theory the so-called Big Bang was just an intermediate stage in a cosmos with an eternal career.

Ba'al Chatzaf

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Clumpiness of Distant Universe Surprises Astronomers

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2011/06/clumpy-universe/

or tinyurl version:

http://tinyurl.com/4x5htat

General Relatvity fails on the scale of spiral galaxies

and now it is seen to fail on the largest scales yet

observed.

Adding more and more fixes like Dark Matter didn't work

on the scale of spiral galaxies and now the fix of Dark

Energy can't fix these larger scale observations.

A new model of gravity is needed. An indefinitely old

universe has no problem with clumpiness on large scales.

Dennis

Here's a link to CRESST on Dark Matter:

http://www.cresst.de/darkmatter.php

I'm a layperson, but in a June 11/2011 article published by the renowned German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung, it says that physicists may have discovered Dark Matter (which is called in the artice 'the glue that holds the the universe together').

Edited by Xray

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Clumpiness of Distant Universe Surprises Astronomers

http://www.wired.com...lumpy-universe/

or tinyurl version:

http://tinyurl.com/4x5htat

General Relatvity fails on the scale of spiral galaxies

and now it is seen to fail on the largest scales yet

observed.

Adding more and more fixes like Dark Matter didn't work

on the scale of spiral galaxies and now the fix of Dark

Energy can't fix these larger scale observations.

A new model of gravity is needed. An indefinitely old

universe has no problem with clumpiness on large scales.

Dennis

Here's a link to CRESST on Dark Matter:

http://www.cresst.de/darkmatter.php

I'm a layperson, but in a June 11/2011 article published by the renowned German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung, it says that physicists may have discovered Dark Matter (which is called in the artice 'the glue that holds the the universe together').

Hypothetical glue. The only observable effect of hypothetical dark matter is gravitation and this is inferred because the motion of stars in distant galaxies is not Keplerean. Dark Matter is hypothesized to account for this un-Keplerian motion. At this point there is no direct observation of (so-called) Dark Matter and no one has any idea of what it is, assuming that it exists. What Dark Matter could be is a failure of the current theories of gravitation.

This is nothing new. In the mid 19th century telescopes became good enough to observe anomalies in the precession of the perihelion of Mercury. At first a hidden planet (a Dark Planet?) was postulated to account for the anomaly, but no such planet was found. It turns out Newtonian Gravitation is not quite right. Later on Newton's gravitational theory was succeed by the General Theory of Relativity. It may turn out that GTR will go the way of Newtonian Gravity into the House of Not Quite Right physical theories.

Ba'al Chatzaf

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