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Recently, I spent two days with Reverend Michael Dowd--onstage musically supporting his service as a guest minister, and then being at a full-bore presentation he gave in our hall (this is at www.uucfm.org , Ft. Myers Florida). My friends, family and I became fast friends with him.

Michael's work is absolutely among the very best of the best stuff out there in the science/spirituality integration effort. I have not seen anything close to it ever, in many ways. He takes up where many have left off, including people I deeply admire, such as Ken Wilber, and even the great Joseph Campbell.

I thoroughly, thoroughly recommend you read his work. I think I have everything he has done, including some very strong DVD's, etc. The main book is called "Thank God for Evolution --How the Marriage of Science and Religion Will Transform Your Life and Our World." His main website is www.thankgodforevolution.com .

This man is well-respected in the scientific community--I include a few endorsements from his friends/colleagues.

He is well-acquainted with Rand and Objectivism, and I asked him if I could bring his work forward via OL. I hope you enjoy it in the spirit intended. He is a wonderful, down-to-earth man, with a razor-sharp scientific mind. His wife, Connie Barlow, is a respected scientist as well and the two of them have been on the road presenting for nine years, now. If he comes to town, do not miss him!

"I read Thank God for Evolution with much pleasure and interest. I found it to be a very thoughtful, knowledgeable, and pertinent discussion, covering challenging and important issues with scholarship and insight."

— Charles Townes

1964 Nobel Prize in Physics; winner of the 2005 Templeton Prize

"The science vs. religion debate is over. Michael Dowd masterfully unites rationality and spirituality in a world view that celebrates the mysteries of existence and inspires each human being to achieve a higher purpose in life. A must read for all, including scientists."

— Craig Mello

2006 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

"The universe took 13.7 billion years to produce this amazing book. I heartily recommend it. I am often asked how science and religion can co-exist. This is a wonderful answer."

— John Mather

NASA Senior Astrophysicist, 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics

"If anyone can persuade a monotheist that the science of evolution—biological, geological, or cosmological—can enrich his or her faith, I'm betting on Michael Dowd."

— Thomas C. Schelling

2005 Nobel Prize in Economics

"Honest students of God should welcome the revelations of science as insights, not fear them as threats. Here is a book in that spirit by a minister who takes evolution to heart, and celebrates it."

— Frank Wilczek

2004 Nobel Prize in Physics

"At last someone who understands that all of reality is sacred and science, our method of comprehending it."

— Lee Hartwell

2001 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

Edited by Rich Engle
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Good to see that at least some of the Prots are finally catching up to the Catholics and Jews.

Kumbaya, my Lord . . .

From my experience Unitarians aren't really Protestants ("Prots"), in that they aren't necessarily Christian or even religious, as in having beliefs about the supernatural. I'm sure that varies from location to location.

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Good to see that at least some of the Prots are finally catching up to the Catholics and Jews.

Kumbaya, my Lord . . .

From my experience Unitarians aren't really Protestants ("Prots"), in that they aren't necessarily Christian or even religious, as in having beliefs about the supernatural. I'm sure that varies from location to location.

Yeah, they're just like Buddy Cianci.

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Good to see that at least some of the Prots are finally catching up to the Catholics and Jews.

Kumbaya, my Lord . . .

From my experience Unitarians aren't really Protestants ("Prots"), in that they aren't necessarily Christian or even religious, as in having beliefs about the supernatural. I'm sure that varies from location to location.

Yeah, they're just like Buddy Cianci.

Ted:

The mayor of Providence who just got out of Federal Prison a few years ago?

Adam

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Good to see that at least some of the Prots are finally catching up to the Catholics and Jews.

Kumbaya, my Lord . . .

From my experience Unitarians aren't really Protestants ("Prots"), in that they aren't necessarily Christian or even religious, as in having beliefs about the supernatural. I'm sure that varies from location to location.

Yeah, they're just like Buddy Cianci.

Ted:

The mayor of Providence who just got out of Federal Prison a few years ago?

Adam

They may not follow Jesus but they expect Providence will deliver.

Edited by Ted Keer
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Good to see that at least some of the Prots are finally catching up to the Catholics and Jews.

Kumbaya, my Lord . . .

From my experience Unitarians aren't really Protestants ("Prots"), in that they aren't necessarily Christian or even religious, as in having beliefs about the supernatural. I'm sure that varies from location to location.

Yeah, they're just like Buddy Cianci.

Ted:

The mayor of Providence who just got out of Federal Prison a few years ago?

Adam

They may not follow Jesus but they expect Providence will deliver.

Yep. One of the classic old line power mayors, a la Papa Daley and Bostons Mayor Curley whose 1st Prison term: "Curley's first notoriety came as a result of having been elected to Boston's Board of Aldermen in 1904 while in prison on a fraud conviction. Curley and an associate, Thomas Curley (no relation), took the civil service exams for postmen for two men in their district to help them get the jobs with the federal government. Though the incident gave him a dark reputation in respectable circles, it aided his image among the working class and poor because they saw him as a man willing to stick his neck out to help those in need.[6] He kept that reputation for the rest of his life and it was known all over the city that the poor and unemployed often lined up outside his house in the mornings to speak with him about getting a job or to get a hand out of few dollars to get them through the week."

2nd Prison term

In June 1947, he was sentenced to 6–18 months on the mail fraud conviction and spent five months at the Federal Correctional Institution in Danbury, Connecticut before his sentence was commuted by President Truman under pressure from the Massachusetts congressional delegation. City Clerk John B. Hynes served as acting mayor during his absence. Truman gave Curley a full pardon in 1950 for both his 1947 and 1904 convictions."

Curley is considered the inspiration for the protagonist Frank Skeffington in the novel and film The Last Hurrah by Edwin O'Connor. When asked his favorite part of the book, he responded "The part where I die."http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eocq67IlRqQ&tracker=False

This is a beautiful movie about politics.

Adam

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Good to see that at least some of the Prots are finally catching up to the Catholics and Jews.

Kumbaya, my Lord . . .

From my experience Unitarians aren't really Protestants ("Prots"), in that they aren't necessarily Christian or even religious, as in having beliefs about the supernatural. I'm sure that varies from location to location.

Yeah, they're just like Buddy Cianci.

Ted:

The mayor of Providence who just got out of Federal Prison a few years ago?

Adam

They may not follow Jesus but they expect Providence will deliver.

Yep. One of the classic old line power mayors,

Jeeze, you force me to explain the damn joke, then you don't even have the grace to pretend to laugh at it?

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Good to see that at least some of the Prots are finally catching up to the Catholics and Jews.

Kumbaya, my Lord . . .

From my experience Unitarians aren't really Protestants ("Prots"), in that they aren't necessarily Christian or even religious, as in having beliefs about the supernatural. I'm sure that varies from location to location.

Yeah, they're just like Buddy Cianci.

Ted:

The mayor of Providence who just got out of Federal Prison a few years ago?

Adam

They may not follow Jesus but they expect Providence will deliver.

Yep. One of the classic old line power mayors,

Jeeze, you force me to explain the damn joke, then you don't even have the grace to pretend to laugh at it?

It was hilarious Ted, I did not think you required my laughter.

Sorry. I will make sure the next time.

lol.

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That reminds of a rich pun in an Eagles number:

"She came from Providence

The one in Rhode Island

Where the Old World shadows hang

Heavy in the air.

She packed her hopes and dreams

Like a refugee

Just as her father came

Across the sea.

[and so on, westward across America, always seeking Paradise, until Hawaii],

where,

"There is no more new frontier, we have got to make it here.

We satisfy our endless needs

And justify our bloody deeds

In the name of Destiny

And in the name of God.

And you can see them here

On Sunday morning,

Stand up and sing about

What it's like Up There;

They call it Paradise

...I don't know why -

Call some place Paradise,

Kiss it goodbye."

(The Last Resort)

Loved that band. :rolleyes:

Edited by whYNOT
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Good to see that at least some of the Prots are finally catching up to the Catholics and Jews.

Kumbaya, my Lord . . .

From my experience Unitarians aren't really Protestants ("Prots"), in that they aren't necessarily Christian or even religious, as in having beliefs about the supernatural. I'm sure that varies from location to location.

The Unitarians are latter day Deists.

Ba'al Chatzaf

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Good to see that at least some of the Prots are finally catching up to the Catholics and Jews.

Kumbaya, my Lord . . .

From my experience Unitarians aren't really Protestants ("Prots"), in that they aren't necessarily Christian or even religious, as in having beliefs about the supernatural. I'm sure that varies from location to location.

The Unitarians are latter day Deists.

Ba'al Chatzaf

Not as a rule, no. Completely incorrect. As a matter of fact a huge portion of UU's are atheists. A great many UU's are recovering refugees from the various Christian faiths. The origins of the Unitarian and Universalist Churches (merged since 1961) can, however, be traced back to Puritan and Quaker times, and much farther back than that (to at least the 1500's). Oh, and for the record, Michael Dowd isn't actually a UU, although his wife Connie is. He might as well be, though, because he works with the UU world so much.

He lectures all over the country. His hardest work is in the Bible Belt. I think that is where he is right now. Tough room.

But none of this is particularly relevant to his work, which is the important thing. You might try looking at that, it is quite good.

Edited by Rich Engle
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Good to see that at least some of the Prots are finally catching up to the Catholics and Jews.

Kumbaya, my Lord . . .

From my experience Unitarians aren't really Protestants ("Prots"), in that they aren't necessarily Christian or even religious, as in having beliefs about the supernatural. I'm sure that varies from location to location.

The Unitarians are latter day Deists.

Ba'al Chatzaf

Not as a rule, no. Completely incorrect. As a matter of fact a huge portion of UU's are atheists. A great many UU's are recovering refugees from the various Christian faiths. The origins of the Unitarian and Universalist Churches (merged since 1961) can, however, be traced back to Puritan and Quaker times, and much farther back than that (to at least the 1500's).

Please see:

http://www.americanu.../demaydeism.htm

From the article:

While not interchangeable, Deism and Unitarianism have many common beliefs. Both subscribed to the necessity of using reason in matters of religion. Both cherish freedom in matters of faith, and place high importance on morality over doctrine. Due to a lack of Deist religious institutions, many Deists have associated themselves with Unitarianism. Both Deism and Unitarianism present a positive, practical view of religion that successfully combines Faith and Reason.

Ba'al Chatzaf

Edited by BaalChatzaf
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Good to see that at least some of the Prots are finally catching up to the Catholics and Jews.

Kumbaya, my Lord . . .

From my experience Unitarians aren't really Protestants ("Prots"), in that they aren't necessarily Christian or even religious, as in having beliefs about the supernatural. I'm sure that varies from location to location.

The Unitarians are latter day Deists.

Ba'al Chatzaf

Not as a rule, no. Completely incorrect. As a matter of fact a huge portion of UU's are atheists. A great many UU's are recovering refugees from the various Christian faiths. The origins of the Unitarian and Universalist Churches (merged since 1961) can, however, be traced back to Puritan and Quaker times, and much farther back than that (to at least the 1500's).

Please see:

http://www.americanu.../demaydeism.htm

From the article:

While not interchangeable, Deism and Unitarianism have many common beliefs. Both subscribed to the necessity of using reason in matters of religion. Both cherish freedom in matters of faith, and place high importance on morality over doctrine. Due to a lack of Deist religious institutions, many Deists have associated themselves with Unitarianism. Both Deism and Unitarianism present a positive, practical view of religion that successfully combines Faith and Reason.

Ba'al Chatzaf

There, now that's much better, isn't it? :) I guess I will have to quote some of Dowd's work to get this back where I wanted it to be, though.

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