dennislmay

Members
  • Posts

    1,236
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1

Everything posted by dennislmay

  1. The epistemological problem of the unperceived seems related to two other problems I have become interested in over the years - innumeracy and compartmentalization [some form of axiomatic holistic reasoning being the ideal]. The question of visual-spatial analytical reasoning seems to relate to all of these issues. ... The unperceived can be related to visual-spatial analytical reasoning in some instances by thinking in patterns and perceiving what is both present and missing in the pattern. That's pretty interesting. I can understand the power in that. I believe that many people think the way you do and now I question the value of schooling them in linear thinking - and grading their esteem on their ability to do what it not natural for them. On the other hand, is spatial thinking teachable or learnable? Holistic thinking is considered "inspiration" but perhaps only by those who lack it and therefore cannot understand it: it seems like magic. The bottom line is that thinking in spatial patterns certainly would enable you to perceive what is missing. Meeting a few people with unusual abilities over the years has given me a better understanding of potential I am missing and what others are missing. I had one physics professor I would say was at the very extreme of mental endurance for learning - he was clearly bright but his ability to endure was extreme. He has a BS in physics at 18 then went to CalTech for graduate school in General Relativity. Some fellow students committed suicide, his first advisor died so he had to restart a new thesis, his second advisor committed suicide and they reshuffled the program with not enough advisors for him to continue [by then 9-10 years or so had gone by and he had taken essentially all the physics and mathematics courses available at the Phd level. He then transferred to the University of Nebraska and worked on his 3rd thesis for his PhD. When everything was finally done it had taken 11-12 years. I was friends with an Air Force Officer who is autistic. While a young teen he suffered a series of strokes from which he recovered. He was now autistic but also high funcitoning socially and athetic to boot. He could memorize an entire page of numbers in a minutes then write them back down. He was a perfect student because he could memorize everything presented to him - graduating from college in 2 years while enlisted in the Air Force then went to OTS. Before either of us spoke about our pasts we both recognized that neither of us was quite normal. I had a math professor in graduate school who had one interesting skill - he could perform square root operations in his head to 8 decimal places just like a calulator. I had a friend who as a student at the time who could hear music played one time then play the entire thing on piano. He was self taught on the piano just from hearing it. I have a few things not quite normal about me but one "skill" is something I have only seen in two other people I have met - extreme finger speed in repetitive motion. Both people who had it were half Native American half white, I am an unknown fraction Native American [somewhere between 1/16 and 1/4]. I timed myself in high school with pencil marks at 1200 repetitions per minute. I have slowed a little but can still inspire awe in childen :-) Of course the guy who is the quick draw champ of all time has my speed beat with hand and arm motion. There are of course people with extreme senses of their physical kinetics, people with extreme language skills, those who can memorize enormous amounts of information and recall it instantly, and those who visually reason to perform amazing computational tasks, peope with extreme senses [i have extreme color vision according to AF testing], and people with extreme social skill for good or bad. I am not sure to what extent visual-spatial reasoning can be taught but I know it can be tested for. Unfortunately it is a highly neglected area in the sciences. I remember one class in graduate thermodynamics where for 2 weeks I wanted to stand up and scream "all you all fucking retarded" when a class assignment lectured on for 2 weeks had a 5 second visual-spatial solution that no one else was able to see. I tried to explain that to the professor a couple minutes into the 2 week lecture but he wouldn't hear of it - so I sat there for 10 - one hour long lectures listening to the wrong way to solve the problem. At the end of 2 weeks someone else finally told him the answer and he just finished up in a minute or so at the beginning of a class and we moved on. I am not sure people missing skills or senses can entirely understand what they are missing or entirely believe others have those skills. When we socialized we want to see in others what we have in ourselves to better unstand ourselves. I think I understand the skills and senses I am missing because I have them to some degree but what if I didn't have them at all - would I still understand? Dennis
  2. Also the ability to perceive cause - effect when there is none plagues many folk. It is the famous post hoc fallacy running rampant. Ba'al Chatzaf One of my favorites is that WWII brought us out of the depression when in fact there were radical changes in policies favoring growth after WWII. Dennis
  3. The epistemological problem of the unperceived seems related to two other problems I have become interested in over the years - innumeracy and compartmentalization [some form of axiomatic holistic reasoning being the ideal]. The question of visual-spatial analytical reasoning seems to relate to all of these issues. I have mentioned anecdotal examples of all of these issues in various posts. The unperceived can be related to visual-spatial analytical reasoning in some instances by thinking in patterns and perceiving what is both present and missing in the pattern. That is in fact how I often understand things in context as much by what is not said or not presented as much as what is. I don't just think about the seen - the empirically observable - but the patterns. The inability to perceive cause and effect patterns seems to plague a large percentage of people. A number of events over the years have shaped my understanding of what other people do and do not understand. Humans as individual owner/operators exhibit a wide range of abilities. It is the exceptions or exceptional that help define the boundaries of the pattern. Understanding the value of what has been lost in the "unseen" is indeed a difficult problem - which is why those who can buy the "seen" with other people's money are so successful. Dennis
  4. -There is no theory of evolution... Just a list of creatures Chuck Norris has allowed to live.
  5. In a related problem - there is much more interest in solving "seen" versus "unseen" problems. When I was in the Air Force one of the jobs I did was modeling field effect transistors [FET] in GaAs used for high power electronics - radars in particular. One day a co-worker was talking about the main failure mechanism in high power microwave frequency circuits and half joking wonders if I can solve the problem since I do modeling. I had in fact already solved the problem but didn't know it was a problem until he told me it was. I took a couple days to redo the modeling specific to that task then showed our boss the solution. He about fell out his chair since apparently it was a real problem known to many - but not me. He immediately figured out a real world implementation to fabricate my solution [i wasn't into the electronic fabrication end of things], in a matter of a couple weeks we had it sent in to be patented. My boss relayed the solution to contractors and a short time later the solution was being implemented in an existing contract the AF had with Hughes Electronics for high power GaAs electronics. I was told later it also went into the next generation of cell phones. I had approached my boss [and other bosses] and the Air Force in general with many innovative things before [spending 10 or 100x the effort needed for the FET solution - some implemented later] but I was always trying to fix a problem before it was recognized as a problem. I was fixing the "unseen" problems trying to get ahead on things. I had been briefed on some secret programs here and there which were fixing "unseen" problems and working ahead of what was known to the outside world - that is what I wanted to do. Unfortunately I found out that you can actually invent things but not have the clearance or be in the right organization to be involved any further. Working on the "unseen" in a bureaucracy is the exception seldom allowed. I found out later this is even more true in large private industry. Anyway the unseen is still out there still not being seen. The unseen problems and the unseen solutions still exist. It remains a part of the economic calculus - not seen. The invisible Black Swan ready to bite. Dennis
  6. You imply there is a record of the 95 percent of patents that do not make a profit. If there is a record, then the 95 percent are NOT unseen. Ba'al Chatzaf What I meant is that even when we have a written record of patents 95% never make it to the market for evaluation by the 99.9999% of the population that does not read the patent record. To the extent this part is seen it tells us much remains unseen. In my home town in Nebraska [Verdigre] a local farm machinery mechanic and his partner invented and patented a new kind of disc which they tested and demonstrated worked better than any disc's on the market [disc to break up clods in the field when farming]. To their joy the rights were purchased by a large farm machinery manufacturing firm. To their dismay the disc was never intended for the market - only to prevent others from making it while they continued to sell their existing product line. By the time the patent would expire the mechanics would have been retired or dead - thus the end of the line for the new discs. Dennis
  7. This makes it all the more important to never locate in one of the growing number of Marxist oriented states. Leave as soon as you can, as best you can and do no business there if at all possible, minimize if you can't avoid them completely. Dennis
  8. I see this as the same issue running through many discussions - both economic and scientific - on this forum and throughout society. There are many historical examples of important discoveries being lost then uncovered or rediscovered again after years, decades, or even centuries have gone by. You can't calculate unseen damages even upon rediscovery because of the chaotic and often exponential economic effects they can have - yet we know of many things that now have value that were not available for long periods of time and logic indicates much more - previously discovered - remains unknown even now, much less project that which died before it was born because of societies ills. Economic calculation and planning does not rely on what we can empirically corroborate alone - if it did Marxist central planning with "seen" results - even though it never has adequate information to correctly plan - would seem reasonable. As 95% of patents never make it to a profit - much remains unseen, as most ideas never make it to a patent - much remains unseen, as most of human history was not productive to science and technology development much of what could have been seen never came to be. As redistribution is the new majority normal more and more will never come to be and/or never be seen. The damage is very real and though not empirical it is very much a part of economic calculation. Dennis
  9. I guess we will have to let the multi-billion dollar survialist related market decide without input from those claiming to be scholars of economics. Dennis
  10. When the purchase was "only" 450 million rounds the NRA-ILA was not worried as that amounted to only "1,384 rounds of ammo per year per law enforcement [officer]" http://www.nraila.org/news-issues/articles/2012/federal-law-enforcement-agencies-buy-ammunition.aspx If the number is now 1.6 billion that is indeed interesting. In 7 1/2 years in the Air Force I fired a total of 12 bullets [.38 special] in a 15 minute span after hours of lectures on safety. 6 to practice, 6 to attempt to qualify for a marksmanship ribbon. I didn't get the ribbon. Dennis On a show about snipers on the Military Channel they described what a sniper would take into the field on a normal mission. They would take 5 magazines full of 9mm pistol ammo [90 rounds], 3-5 magazines full of 5.56mm X 45 NATO [90-150 rounds] for their M-4 , but as few as 20 rounds for their sniper rifle. One shot one kill on the primary but once the big gun goes off you might need all of the rest to get out of Dodge. Just interesting - doesn't tell us much about government law enforcement [not military] purchasing large quantities of ammo. Apparently too good to reload - unlike the military when it does training. Dennis
  11. When the purchase was "only" 450 million rounds the NRA-ILA was not worried as that amounted to only "1,384 rounds of ammo per year per law enforcement [officer]" http://www.nraila.org/news-issues/articles/2012/federal-law-enforcement-agencies-buy-ammunition.aspx If the number is now 1.6 billion that is indeed interesting. In 7 1/2 years in the Air Force I fired a total of 12 bullets [.38 special] in a 15 minute span after hours of lectures on safety. 6 to practice, 6 to attempt to qualify for a marksmanship ribbon. I didn't get the ribbon. Dennis
  12. But that only supports his point. If quality of life is not improving at a similar rate to that of technology and science, then we're doing it wrong. I agree. But the wrong is in the area of morality and politics, not science and technology. Technology is alive and well. I wish I could say the same for the art of governance.Ba'al Chatzaf The cart will follow the horse, eventually. --Brant Which is the whole point - the imminent financial collapse and Marxist influences over Western governments has already curtailed many kinds of investments and R&D work. It is a case of the seen and unseen. Everyone sees the information electronics revolution for sale at Wal-Mart - you don't see the medical device manufacturers who are closing shop [one here locally], the food industry which started ramping up automation before the DOT.com bubble but has now largely retreated in many sectors to slow all mechanical and/or hand-placed work - early 1980's style. You don't see the many advanced technology programs put on hold at the end of the Cold War that only now 20+ years later are starting to be recreated [reinventing the wheel] by the next generation. Yes hand held information systems in the form of smart phones are a wonderful thing [the seen]. Basic economics tells us redistribution of wealth is destroying the unseen at an alarming rate. Government funded science has encouraged the destruciton of an entire generation of theoretical physicists - it is not clear how many generations it will take to recover. Government funded science is in bed with government politics redistributing wealth via climate fear mongering without any science behind it. Failures in morality and politics are beginning to unravel science and technology - the cart will follow the horse, soon. Dennis
  13. Obama will tell them to jump and he will expect them to say "How high?" but they will say "F*** you!" Then what will Obama do? He will fire them or imprison them and replace them with Yes Men. That has already started with the higher ranks of the military as it did under Clinton. Dennis
  14. I have not seen any scholarly articles or books on post collapse economics - specifically what items to hoard now for when they will not be available later. There are obviously all kinds of specific sales pitches out there in many forms but you would think the large and growing survival industry would generate some scholarly articles or serious texts on the subject. I know from ancient times till now responsible military and political people have understood strategic materials planning. Since virtually no one would now claim we have a responsible government such planning would seem to fall upon individuals. I'm sure most scholars from libertopia would see this as beneath them to even address - and certainly against their politics. Where is the John Lott of economic thought on his issue? Dennis
  15. Writer Jeff Riggenbach: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlas_Shrugged "Rand's overall message with regard to science seems clear: the role of science in human life and human society is to provide the knowledge on the basis of which technological advancement and the related improvements in the quality of human life can be realized. But science can fulfill this role only in a society in which human beings are left free to conduct their business as they see fit." Which begs the question - has the time arrived? Dennis
  16. I have been discussing my physics work by e-mail with one of my uncles by marriage - he is a retired engineering professor with an interest in physics - his neice works in General Relativity modeling of black holes. I'm sure one of his next questions is why I haven't published my work - this summarizes my views nicely. Dennis
  17. Physicists who developed legacy physics liked this: The present generation - inbred - timely publication? - insiders only need apply.
  18. A deadly serious problem which seems to plague people at every level of education and accomplishment. Often the best and brightest are worse because they have deceived themselves into believing if they couldn't and didn't think of it - it can't be done. It seems a PhD or Nobel Prize is often the blinders keeping options from being seen - the arrogance of accomplishment. Dennis
  19. Can you explain DIM and the connection to Leonard Peikoff? Dennis
  20. There are a number of short term weather patterns which are somewhat predictable - just because a process is a chaotic does not mean there is not some short predictability still left. Longer term patterns show we are due for an ice age - timing is chaotic but history says we are due. It has been warmer and colder than now since the last ice age so the tiny variations in climate today predict no trend whatsoever. There is no science in the claims of doom and gloom global warming because their modeling has absolutely no experimental backup as all such modeling requires [they have done zero experiments in the field and have resisted doing so because the house of cards will implode]. Regardless of having no valid modeling, Science 101 throws the joke out before it starts because of the chaotic nature of what they are attempting to model. Dennis
  21. The premise of the TARDIS in Dr. Who - bigger on the inside than the outside. Dennis
  22. Poisonous to a free society. As a matter of historical fact civilization prior to about 200 or 300 years ago was predicated on slavery. The Greek city states depended on slavery to get the grunge work done. Athens, Sparta, Corinth depended on slaves. Rome was built on slavery. Europe up to and including part of the Renaissance was predicated on feudal labor which is a form of slavery. Free societies did not happen until the American Revolution. And even then half of the United States depended on slave labor. Free societies was we might conceive them really did not start to happen until the middle of the 19th century. Ba'al Chatzaf All true, free societies created an exponential change in what civilization is all about. The masters of a slave based societies can purchase the benefits of what free society civilization has created - but slaved based societies could not have created those benefits themselves. Another case of the seen and the unseen. The zero-sum statists among us think free societies have pretty much created all the benefits it is going to and now it is time to loot and divide up the pie - never able to imagine a growing pie. The same mistake made over and over by well meaning statists - I suspect most statists don't care about about the rest of civilization but are primarily interested in personal power and taking the wealth of others which is why reasoning with them or negotiating in good faith is a fools game. Dennis
  23. Faith and zealotry are a big part of the global warming and ozone hole path toward collectivist power. Faith is a big requirement since neither passes science 101. Green is the new Red as the saying goes. Environmentalism and mother Earth make an excellent religion - who wants to shit in their own nest? Can't be bothered with experiments or real numbers when faith will carry the day and concentrate power into the hands of those pulling the strings of the gullible. Dennis
  24. "Policymakers seldom foresee the destructive consequences of their interventionist government policies because they seldom understand how markets work." While that may be true of some of the tards that work in government I tend to believe that the Democratic leadership and those behind the scenes supporting them know all too well exactly what they are doing. Dennis Yes indeed. These creatures really want the rest of us to be un-free. They have no sense of themselves unless they are interfering with and controlling others. If they were not so dangerous they would be pathetic. Ba'al Chatzaf Well said - far too many people mistakenly believe that the collectivists are merely mistaken in their beliefs and can be reasoned with or bargained with as players who are still really on the same side - just promoting the wrong methods. With the vast majority of collectivists you are simply furthering their goals as they will simply use that naive view to continue their goals. They need to be opposed at every juncture - there is no playing nice guy or reasoning with those who want to enslave. They have a mentality and worldview that is poisonous to civilization. Dennis
  25. "Policymakers seldom foresee the destructive consequences of their interventionist government policies because they seldom understand how markets work." While that may be true of some of the tards that work in government I tend to believe that the Democratic leadership and those behind the scenes supporting them know all too well exactly what they are doing. Dennis