sbeaulieu

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Everything posted by sbeaulieu

  1. sbeaulieu

    Imogen Heap

    Her music is amazing...very unique. ~ Shane
  2. Matus, Awesome 3D work! And Kaneda's bike...wicked! I always hoped that someone would come out with his bike, or even Cloud's from Final Fantasy VII. ~ Shane
  3. If you play Alliance, like me, then you will most likely get the "little emo-punk kids". Horde, statistically, has more adult players. The guild I'm in has mostly 25-yr olds and up. As for fantasy, I've stuck with Terry Goodkind the past 13 years. I've read Piers Anthony, Anne McAffrey, Magaret Weiss and Tracy Hickman, and J.K Rowling. I like series as they allow for more storytelling. But there are other authors with single books that are great, too. ~ Shane
  4. Autumn is my favorite as well...when I'm in Maine. In the tropics, it's just a change of temp...ugh. ~ Shane
  5. I enjoy reading fiction...I sway from fantasy to sci-fi every couple of years. I love movies. I enjoy getting out to the beach with the wife and kids. Just about anything that has my kids smiling is good for me. I started out playing D&D for many years since HS. Haven't done pencil & paper gaming for some time...that got taken over by WoW. Can you say four level 70s on Moonrunner? I love the community of players where you can hang out without hanging out with people all over the world. First-person shooters = great stress relief. But I mainly love games that are incorporated into a great story. So my faves would be RPGs. Board games like Chess, Monopoly and Risk top that list. ~ Shane
  6. You bring up several issues. 1. Legality of taxation - While it is law, the taking of something (money in form of taxes) without putting the effort in on the making/processing/distribution/ of the product goes against free trade. There is no giving back from government on your paid taxes. That is to say, the money they take isn't put into programs/grants that you freely agree to. 2. The government trying to put a salary cap on CEOs is downright wrong. What external agency has the right to dictate what you can or cannot make? If CEOs are giving themselves raises at the expense of their workers wages, that's wrong. But if all his/her workers are content with their work, pay, and compesation, and they have entered into that contract willingly, I see no problem with CEOs doing that. They have worked hard for their success and should be entitled to enjoying their profits. 3. Any enterprise of business works off of supply and demand. If you make something I need, then you and I would come to an agreement. In most cases, I would buy what you make if I needed it. Since oil is in demand, money is certainly going to be made. As industry booms in third-world countries, the demand for oil is going to increase. Since there is a finite amount of oil that is refined/sold daily, they have to increase prices. This ensures that everyone will have a chance at buying that product. All in all, the government capping CEO salaries will not impact how much the company makes. But I think their attempt is to stem the amount of money CEOs are making vs. what the company is spending to purchase the oil and refine it. There's a disconnect when the company is spending more, but their CEOs are making more. ~ Shane
  7. Nothing defined: nonexistence. Probably the best word from dictionary.com I can think of. Funny though, they also define "nothing" as "something" that is nonexistent. Uhh...
  8. According to ARI, more than 25 million copies of Atlas Shrugged have sold, with 1 million sold each year. Given the popularity and influence of Ayn's book, a rapt audience should not be hard to find for this movie. If people can sit and read her 1096-page novel, a 3-hr or longer movie will be a non-issue. And really, what's more important? The message/idea, or the bottom line? I believe both will pay dividends in the long run. ~ Shane
  9. Granted that times have changed, I would still like to see Atlas Shrugged be true to the book, and in the past setting. It would be a snapshot of that period and what those people had to deal with - a great historical epic. We might learn more from it than a present day setting. ~ Shane
  10. In today's theories, has Mars been used as a possible benchmark? Earlier in our solar system's life, I imagine that it could have supported life during its cooling period. But then as the millennia passed, it cooled beyond the point of sustaining life. Just a thought. ~ Shane
  11. It's times like these where I'm alt-tabbing like a madman to hit dictionary.com :frantics: As a previous military instructor, it was my job to assess my audience before introducing them to the theories and mechanics. It was my job to make sure they understood the terms. It was my job to ensure the material was of a language they were familiar with. It was my job to use analogies (as many times as necessary) that clicked via associations. In order for us to understand Paul's perspective, a common denominator between him and the participants has to be found (language, examples, analogies, etc). I may be oversimplifying, but I won't attempt to throw words that I don't understand the full meaning of. It's just a basic approach I've learned over 4 years of teaching that has proven successful to me when teaching high-level communications (IT). ~ Shane
  12. If things were that bad, you should have pawned the guitar and the Chivas. = Mindy Not if the Chivas is the Century blend! I can't play the guitar, but I can sure enjoy the scotch! :drool: ~ Shane
  13. That's coming from a rational perspective that anyone would take. To kill them because of their association to Satan...laughable. They never once mention the mice eating their wheat (solid food and soup not included). ~ Shane
  14. I'd agree with statement wholeheartedly. That's been my intro to Objectivism through Terry Goodkind's fiction which is loaded with various fundamentals and intricacies. His themes carry the fundamentals, and the way the stories unfold deliver the intricacies through characters and plot. This forum has shed light on more than I could possibly fathom, so I'm sort of a loiterer myself. But my intent is to absorb and act through discussion. Another work of fiction, Old Nick's Guide to Happiness (plug-in for Nicholas Dykes ;)), cuts to the chase by defining the philosophy outright, with examples, and uses it to compare and contrast among world philosophies. I'm ecstatic as I'm finally able to understand and apply it to my life today and see what I've done right and wrong. In all, fiction makes Objectivism digestible for me as a great introduction to this most rational of philosophies. ~ Shane
  15. Now you're stereotyping. May as well call of us in uniform killers. ~ Shane I'm talking about police in a position to do you harm. After you talk to them a little you'll find out if they are decent people or not, but be careful what you say; they may write it down. --Brant I fully agree. ~ Shane
  16. sbeaulieu

    Hello!

    Now that's a place worth visiting! Nice to know we have some well-traveled members here ;) Welcome! ~ Shane
  17. Consider it a whisper, then, in the confines of this forum. ~ Shane
  18. Now you're stereotyping. May as well call of us in uniform killers. ~ Shane
  19. He makes a great point at the end about how the reporters aren't airing their families publicly before going public to slander Sarah Palin's. "Obama's Mama!" Love it. Iron Legs Obama - should be a Kung Fu Theater flick.
  20. Thanks to this attitude, they will come. Sanction a little, give a lot. --Brant My view, currently, isn't to interpret this as a national crackdown or martial law. I won't subscribe to the scare some seem to think of it as. Now, should we see this on every major highway in every state (and at the same time), I'll change that attitude. I'm just saying that at the discomfort of a checkpoint to check for dangers against the populace, is it really that big a deal? ~ Shane
  21. And the frog continues to be slowly boiled. First it was DUI checkpoints, then checkpoints for illegal drugs. Who knows what's next? Checkpoints to check for legal immigration status? Checkpoints to check for unpaid child support? Or unpaid back taxes? Or child pornography stored on people's laptop computers? The possibilities are endless! Meanwhile, we have self-identified objectivists telling us how wonderful the police are, how they are ready to risk their lives to protect us, how they are our benefactors, just like the heroes of Atlas Shrugged, how anger and resentment at this cadre of brownshirts must be motivated by envy for our betters. And, of course, we are nasty, evil people if we use any unkind language to describe our friends in blue who, after all, are only protecting us by pulling us over without cause and searching our cars. Oh well, not to worry. According to the fine folks in our government, the terrorists hate us for our freedom. So it's only logical that, by having the police systematically destroy our freedom, the terrorists will no longer have any reason to hate us. We'll be safe forever from the threat of terrorism, at the mere cost of living in a police state. I guess we should be greatful for a deal like that. Martin Nothing to hide, nothing to worry about. It goes without saying that instances like this one can be alarming. But, take the population of the entire US (estimated 300+ million), and how do you go about keeping us safe? I'd rather see occasional checkpoints like this then have them come kicking our doors in systematcially across the US. ~ Shane
  22. Barbara, Do you mean to ask who in the end should decide what is "extra objective, and deeply factually neutral" and what "subjectivity and personal opinions" need to be "stripped away" in the judges? Why, Kyrel, of course. He has made that clear in many posts. Michael We could vote on it! Wait, never mind... ~ Shane
  23. Mindy, I was referring to studiodekadent when I wrote this. I need to make it a habit of quoting or being more specific, so I changed my original post to reflect what my response was to. ~ Shane
  24. I can see if you're going for aesthetics, but there is still a problem in the long run because that weight loss won't last. The human body is very, very efficient. For instance, the more water you drink, the less water your body will have to store (because it's getting a reliable external source). That's why you see fitness-minded folks drinking tons of it. As well as water, the body will keep stored calories (fat) to a minimum if it's getting a reliable external source. Small meals (6 is the trend) throughout the day help stabilize your body's metabolism. Because of the low caloric intake, the body will not need to store excesses. The key here is to exercise to reduce the current fat stores of your body along with the daily food intake. The aesthetics approach you're taking might be well and good on the short term, but it's likely that your muscle composition is taking the brunt of the punishment vs. your fat stores (the fat is the energy reserve, so used as last resort). What does that all mean? Well, the one-a-day meals are likely getting stored as body fat (since it's not getting a reliable external source). Your metabolism is in the valley vs. the peak. If you do this over an extended period of time, your body won't adapt quickly when going to a regular diet again. It will still be thinking "I need to keep these calories because I'm not getting enough." This contributes to the quick weight gain crash dieters experience. ~ Shane