Ellen Stuttle

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Ellen Stuttle last won the day on January 2

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About Ellen Stuttle

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  1. Ellen Stuttle

    Aristotle's wheel paradox

    That does the job right there of demonstrating that any inner circle must be slipping, since all positions of the entire configuration are always the same distance relative to the contact point. Ellen
  2. Ellen Stuttle

    Aristotle's wheel paradox

    "Tangential velocity" is and needs to be in relation to a tangent at the point at which it's measured. You effectively accept the idea of an imagined tangent line in accepting the idea of tangential velocity, but you reject the idea of a particular imagined tangent line - the horizontal tangent at the 6 o'clock position - in rejecting the idea of an imagined track on which the smaller circle rolls. This is what I was trying to get through to you, but never mind. Your subsequent sentence mixes up rotational speed and tangential velocity. And then you go on in a subsequent reply to Max to make the same mix-up and you call it "nitpicking" when Max explains the thorough screw up in your thinking which results. Hopeless. As Max says: I, too, am afraid that it isn't satire. You really are muddled beyond unmuddling. Ellen
  3. Ellen Stuttle

    Aristotle's wheel paradox

    You haven't answered the question. Ellen
  4. Ellen Stuttle

    Aristotle's wheel paradox

    Here's where the "crutch" charge was started, in a diatribe by Merlin on November 19, 2018. Merlin has subsequently made the "crutch" charge nine times in close to the identical wording (viz., that the track is your crutch without which "you are too lame-brained to deal with reality"). Ellen
  5. Ellen Stuttle

    Aristotle's wheel paradox

    What is there for the inner wheel to have tangential velocity in relation to? You won't accept the idea of an imaginary support, but then you turn around and rely on the idea of a tangent which doesn't physically exist. Ellen
  6. Ellen Stuttle

    Where are you?

    As I'd said in the post Bob replied to. How many repetitions will be needed before he pays attention? Ellen
  7. Ellen Stuttle

    Where are you?

    I'm reading consecutively from where I last posted yesterday. Ninth's post ends a page, so I've had no glimpse of what, if anything, Bob responded. If he's responded in true-to-form fashion, he'll have said something along the lines of his having a high IQ, therefore not being a "knucklehead." However, Mr. Brilliant - especially at math - doesn't seem to be able to grasp that about .159... miles north of the South Pole, one could circumambulate the globe walking one mile west. (Also on smaller circles the circumference of which is a whole-number fraction of one mile.) Ellen
  8. Ellen Stuttle

    Aristotle's wheel paradox

    The smaller wheel's travel distance is lengthened (though not artificially) by its slipping relative to a horizontal tangent at the 6 o'clock position. This is not the same statement as that the smaller wheel's circumference is lengthened. Ellen
  9. Ellen Stuttle

    Aristotle's wheel paradox

    No, that would not be more suitable. There's no lengthening of the smaller wheel's circumference. See Jonathan's and Max's replies to the rest of your post. Ellen
  10. Ellen Stuttle

    Where are you?

    I won't argue about the degree of Tony's bad at mech. He isn't good. It's just that he does bring in some considerations - especially friction - which would have some effect in a physical instantiation. I often wonder if Tony bothers to read what he's responding to. I think that often Bob only sees some isolated feature of a post to which he responds, and that he does not follow the progression of a discussion, which is why he comes up with strange things, like taking your visual illustration of the walking instructions as being a northwest direction. Ellen
  11. Ellen Stuttle

    Aristotle's wheel paradox

    We did say that the circumference of the small circle slides or slips in relationship to the track. The small circle is not doing a true roll on the track. This is not to say that the small wheel slips in relationship to the surrounding figure. Nor is it to say that the small wheel's circumference is extended (your latest incorrect attribution). Ellen
  12. Ellen Stuttle

    Aristotle's wheel paradox

    Who's mad? Ellen
  13. Ellen Stuttle

    Where are you?

    Tony isn't so lacking in mech. It's that he puts things into the mech which muddle up the problem as posed. I've seen no signs of his being any good at math. And he's atrocious at reading comprehension - See.
  14. Ellen Stuttle

    Aristotle's wheel paradox

    Now you're making up something else (the idea that the small wheel's circumference is extended) that no one has said - just as you've kept talking as if people were saying that the small circle/wheel slips in relation to the surrounding configuration, when you've been told and hold that no one is saying that. Ellen
  15. Ellen Stuttle

    Where are you?

    Heaven forfend we should not be "in the spirit" of the puzzle! I misunderstood what you were asking, but my question was because I wasn't sure if Jon meant literally walkable places or not. He did specify in regard to circles around the South Pole that only about 50 or so subsets were walkable-by-a-human. Ellen