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  1. 2 points
    So does William discuss? No, he posts a link: Slide, slip, slither, avoid - and then whine if you're called dishonest And what the linked-to list is about, as Michael points out, isn't how to have a discussion but how to indoctrinate. Ellen
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    Jonathan, It's funny. When you ask for repeatable scientific results re Climate Change, you always get blah blah blah and they never use the term "repeatable results." It's like going into a small eatery and saying, "Do you have an ice cream cone?" And the person says, "Here's some tasty steamed octopus." You ask, "What about an ice cream cone?" The person says, "Look at these green beans and mashed potatoes. How big a portion do you want?" "But I want an ice cream cone." "Well, you've come to the right place. Our mac and cheese is amazing." "Don't you have ice cream cones?" "Only stupid people think we don't have hamburgers." "You really don't have ice cream cones?" "True believer idiot. The dinner rolls are right in front of you. God, some people..." He throws a stack of menus in your face--ones that do not list ice cream cones... And on it goes. It's amazing to watch. Michael
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    Oh, I am staggered! It is a genius plot and This Story Must Be Told. And finally the world will see sex scenes that reflect Real Life and Right Values and Canadian Respectability, I can't wait! I must commune with my muse now -- the first lines of dialogue are coming to me -- oh, oh, ohhh!
  7. 1 point
    12. Ignore their questions. 13. Do not acknowledge any gaps in your kowledge, or any inability of yours to address their questions or challenges. 14. Serve tasty steamed octopus. 15. Avoid their questions. Act as if they haven't been asked, even if they've been asking them for years. 16. When you don't have answers to their questions, change the subject. 17. Serve more tasty steamed octopus. Smile. 18. Give them information and advice on how to be polite, and how to influence people. Don't follow the advice yourself. Offer hugs. 19. Reward them with tasty steamed octopus, and a handjob if you're comfortable doing that. 20. Bring in meatpuppets who you think are ringers. Display gleeful anticipation. 21. More TSO. 22. Ignore the fact that your meatpuppets didn't do any better than you've done in addressing any substance. 23. Randomly choose one of the steps above and repeat. Then repeat it again. 24. Tee hee hee. Never forget to tee hee hee during any of the above steps! 25. All they can eat TSO, 24/7.
  8. 1 point
    Jon, Because you don't win culture wars with bans. I'm playing the long game. You seem to prefer short term gratification. I won't be doing any podcasts with any leftie authoritarians, though. They went for the short term gratification and bans (social media and elsewhere). Now they're losing the culture war big time as they sell out to crony corporations just to stay relevant and they are too hate-filled to see it. Once their idiocy stops making money and/or power for the elitist establishment, they will go the way of Avenatti. Slower than him, granted, but the path is the same. Michael
  9. 1 point
    This got some traction on Reddit: "It’s Time to Boot Climate Deniers Off Social Media." I wonder if the person behind this article would go on a live podcast with us ...
  10. 1 point
    William made starkly obvious how dumb his thinking on climate issues is with this question: Ellen
  11. 1 point
    Carbonic acid in the atmosphere ... from the Spencer Weart online verson of The Discovery of Global Warming, featuring a brief overview of the work of John Tyndall in the Victorian era: See also: "John Tyndall: founder of climate science?"
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    I find this to be a slippery slope. Hiroshima was a product of humans. Just because we evolved in nature and utilize parts of isn't a safe implication that what we are doing isn't destructive. Human history is quite frequently filled with humans acting as if there were no repercussions for their actions when in hindsight we realize how ignorantly we acting. I absolutely agree that adding to the shared knowledge base is key to human growth. Seems a bit pointless to do so, however, when given access to the information individuals simply disregard the warnings in favour of their own whims.
  14. 1 point
    Any changes in the system are driven by changes. This seems obvious but there is an often overlooked implication of that statement. Even though an aspect of the system might have a large factor in the energy balance (albedo) it isn't relevant to changes unless it is changing as well. Albedo is made up of 3 main components scattering by the land and surface, clouds, and reflection from ice and snow. Of these 3 factors, the first and last are changing the most. Land use changes (clearing of forests) creates an increase in albedo while melting of snow and sea ice creates a decrease in albedo. Clouds overall aren't changing from much to none. I've seen some reports putting them at a slight decline, but currently can't find that. So as to whether or not they are impactful to albedo, I'd have to say no. What is referred to as the wild card, or uncertainty with clouds is what kind of feedback clouds will be. Everyone recognizes without issue that clouds reflect sunlight, but they also trap heat. How a cloud impacts the system not only depends on the cloud type that forms but also the timing of them. Obviously nighttime clouds are rather lousy at reflecting incoming light but do a wonderful job of trapping heat. Overall, the feedback effect of clouds is currently considered 'likely positive' (https://www.nature.com/articles/nclimate3402). Clouds are what will bring the system back into equilibrium eventually. As I see it, the simplistic explanation is: Warming causes a decrease in relative humidity -> causes a decrease in cloud production -> less cloud production means a gradual buildup of specific humidity -> this eventually restores the hydrologic (cloud) cycle The hydrologic cycle can't really be fully restored though until the system has stopped warming. Current observations are specific humidity is increasing but relative is still in decline. https://www.climate.gov/news-features/understanding-climate/2013-state-climate-humidity Good general link about clouds https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/earth-and-planetary-sciences/cloud-cover
  15. 1 point
    I can't say precisely when all of these hypothesis were made, but these are the staple hypothesis of AGW: (https://scied.ucar.edu/longcontent/predictions-future-global-climate) 1. First and foremost - burning fossil fuels increases atmospheric concentrations of co2. Seems like a no-brainer but I've crossed paths with individuals who dispute that the current rise in atm co2 is not due to human burning of fossil fuels. 2. As a consequence of #1, Increasing non-condensing greenhouse gas concentrations will cause the system to warm 3. As a consequence of #1, pH of the ocean will shift to a more acidic pH as they absorb more co2 4. Along with #2, increasing ghg will simultaneously cause the stratosphere and on up to cool 5. As a consequence of #2, there will be some positive feedbacks triggered, ie reduced albedo due to loss of sea ice, increased water vapor in the atm 6. As a consequence of #2, there will be sea level rise (SLR). There are 2 reasons for this. 1 - warmer water takes up more volume and 2 - melting glaciers To me, those are the key hypothses of AGW, each of which has now been observed. See below for simple responses to each point, starting with #2. If I need to cover my bases on #1, let me know: 2. https://www.bloomberg.com/graphics/2015-whats-warming-the-world/ 3. http://www.whoi.edu/OCB-OA/page.do?pid=112157 4. https://www.wunderground.com/resources/climate/strato_cooling.asp (contains links to supporting papers) 5. https://www.nature.com/articles/nature06207 6. https://www.pnas.org/content/115/9/2022 For those wanting to read papers that might be behind a paywall, there is a chrome (maybe firefox as well) extension called unpaywallme. It will give you a lock icon that changes to color when you reach a paywalled paper that has a free version available. It's not 100%, but it will get you most papers for free.
  16. 1 point
    It's "Meatpuppets" in general, but our specific special guests are "Meatballs," just out of endearment. J
  17. 1 point
    What Brad is doing is trying to bog down the discussion by overwhelming it with minutiae. The game is that we asked for repeatable, so Brad is going to pretend to not understand the context, and give all sorts of examples of repeatable in regard to noncontroversial pieces of the puzzle, while hoping that we didn't notice that he switched to talking about pieces when we were specifically asking for repeatable entire picture. It's like someone saying that granite floats on air. You ask for proof via repeatable experiments, and douchebag then goes into the repeatable science of the mineralogical composition of granite, and what evidence there is to label it felsic. Do you know what felsic means? Huh, stupid? No? But yet you have your big important opinions about rocks not floating! Science denier! That, and another tack is bickering about how badly Brad's being treated, and who said what. Boo hoo hoo. Brad has lots of time for all of that, but no time for answering my questions. That's fanboy/activist stuff, not science. Science is actually the mindset that the alarmist fanboy/activists ridicule: critical thinking, skepticism, caution, testing, etc. A truly scientific mindset is that of trying as hard as one can to find flaws in any theory. I don't get the impression that Brad, Meatball2, or Billy have ever taken that approach. Their mindset seems to be that of confirmation bias, heroically fighting the silly "denier" rubes, tee hee heeing, and high-fiving. But maybe I'm wrong. I guess Meatball2 is gone, but I'd like to ask Brad and Billy to tell us about their critical examination of the idea of anthropogenic climate change. What are your biggest criticisms? Do you have any? What holes have you found in the theory? What are the biggest weaknesses in whatever theory you have the most confidence? Do you feel that you have to hide them? Show us your critical scientific side rather than just the fanboy side. After all, even the IPCC identifies severe weaknesses. It admits to significant limitations. Anyway, there's no need for the trick of trying to obscure the forest with leaves. It's really as simple as X amount of CO2 over time period Y should equal temperature Z. Sounding like a broken record: In regard to the big picture issue of anthropogenic climate change (and not isolated, smaller pieces of the picture), show us the repeatable, successful predictions. Identify specifically what was the hypothesis, precisely what predictions were made, when were they made, what potential results were identified ahead of time as falsifying or invalidating the hypothesis, what the start and finish dates of the experiment were, provide the unmolested data, the untainted control, and the unmanipulated historical record. J
  18. 1 point
    Sorry, you don't know me and you really shouldn't try speaking for me. I don't really don't care if you are impressed by me or anything I have to say. My intent isn't to garner followers. I'm only trying to illustrate, currently, what the greenhouse effect is so we can move forward in the conversation. No point in jumping to radiative transfer models when there is ignorance on what they represent.
  19. 1 point
    How shall I respond to a comment that presumes I operate in bad faith? "Deflection and blah blah blah" ...
  20. 1 point
    Former Trump White House lawyer calls Mueller 'American hero,' says probe is no witch hunt.
  21. 1 point
    I was very born and raised in Tucson. I've been here continually since 1995. I know why it snowed in Tucson today. I SAW IT COME DOWN! A dreadful sight, but glorious! The record snowfall in this hot city is 5 inches, I've been told. Gone with the Sun. On nearby Mt. Lemmon is the southern most United States ski facility. But don't come here for the skiing, go to Flagstaff. Or, better, COLORADO! Next time ask the expert. ---Brant I didn't tell you why it snowed in Tucson, that takes money I don't have (yet) but you do--I hope we have a street in Tucson called "Tyndall"--I lived on it just west of the University of Arizona as a medium-sized boy (my old home destroyed by high-rised student housing--SOB!) in the early and mid-1950s I swear upon the altar of God (eternal hostility over every form of tyranny over the mind of man) that every word I've written here is true (My grandfather, Irving Brant, is responsible for that inscription inside the Jefferson Memorial)
  22. 1 point
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    He can’t do it. He can’t resist his stalker urges.
  24. 1 point
    William, No it isn't. That link goes to NBC News. And NBC News has been on a propaganda campaign against President Trump for over two years. I don't know what the "best bet" would be, but going to a place with no credibility whatsoever except as a propaganda outfit is not it. Michael
  25. 1 point
    Vote for democrats, dudes, so we can impeach Trump and the Koch brothers, and indict Rush Limbaugh, and fine MSK, bro!
  26. 1 point
    The left is using the same tactic in regard to the Khashoggi issue that they use for climate doom. Unfalsifiability. Just like all possible outcomes prove catastrophic manmade climate change, all potential choices of courses of action in response to the Khashoggi killing are wrong. Our Billy is even participating. It's the reason he won't answer questions about the proper course of action. He and the rest of the left wish to reserve The ability to condemn, no matter what.
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    Looks like this is the same story as this: http://reason.com/blog/2018/10/03/dog-rape-hoax-papers-pluckrose-lindsay This part has me in stitches: Wilson spent 100 hours in three dog parks, where she made note of a whole bunch of times when one dog humped another. When the humping was male-on-male, owners intervened in the overwhelming number of cases. But when the humping was male-on-female, owners were far less likely to stop it. This, the study suggests, might say something about the owners' internalized homophobia and their willingness to overlook female victims of sexual assault.
  32. 1 point
    Is Amazon Bad for the Postal Service? Or Its Savior? https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/04/technology/amazon-postal-service-trump.html April 4, 2018 SEATTLE — Five times in the last week, President Trump has pointed his Twitter arrows at Amazon over what he insists is a bad deal for the United States Postal Service. Mr. Trump wrote on Tuesday that the agreement, which sets what Amazon pays the Postal Service for many orders, costs American taxpayers billions of dollars. “I am right about Amazon costing the United States Post Office massive amounts of money for being their Delivery Boy,” he wrote. [...] But the Postal Service says all such deals it makes are profitable — and must be by law. An independent body, the Postal Regulatory Commission, oversees the rates that the Postal Service charges for its products. By law, the agreements it cuts with corporate customers like Amazon must cover their “attributable costs” that directly result from their use of the postal network. Amazon helps lower those costs by organizing the packages it takes to the Post Office by destination ZIP code in over 35 sorting centers around the country, leaving less work that must be done by postal workers. The company relies on the Postal Service strictly for last-mile delivery to customers, short trips that further limit the cost of delivering each package. [...]
  33. 1 point
    Responsible to the employee and to "society". Which is not necessarily altruism, though invariably it gets packaged that way. This ("responsibility to stakeholders" in modern parlance), as opposed to the "invisible hand" of Adam Smith. Alright, let's move on. Allow me to assert, without proof, something I believe is most likely true: Amazon receives a sufficient number of job applicants for its entry-level positions that it could fill them all without hiring a single beneficiary of government assistance. So why don't they? Could it be because they are forbidden to ask? There are a whole host of questions you're not allowed to ask nowadays, like marital status...I'm not even going to start compiling a list here. Actually, I don't think Amazon seeks to exclude struggling single mothers, but note that they couldn't even if they wanted to. Ultimately what this comes down to is whether Amazon may pay market rates for labor. Since they're so successful are they to be held to a different standard than McDonalds? And they have some number of government contracts (which they're dependent on? What percentage of their revenue comes from the government? Is it a no-bid deal? Did they get an affirmative action preference?).
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    The first video termination did not leave any clues about its date or topic, so here are two videos of the Tucker procedure featuring indomitable Amy, from January and April, of this year respectively. Thanks for the update, Korben. Argh, why didn't he just do a tetch of research? The date on this one is July 2017 ...
  36. 1 point
    I think it a mistake to focus on the science which few of us are able to judge. Regardless of the science, the political question is whether this provides justification for a massive concentration of wealth and power in Washington, DC. Even if things do heat up, I doubt the government will respond in a more efficient and economical manner than will leaving people to sort this out for themselves. About the only regulation I would support would be a stiff tax on hot air from politicians.
  37. 1 point
    The "Manager" quote in the box at the top reminds me of Deming, the statistician who preached quality control after WWII to deaf ears in the US, so he went to Japan and made that country a world leader in quality automobiles and electronics. While this was based in part on statistics, it also included much about management practices. I think the common thread is the question of whether the management task is to make things work or to assign blame when they don't. This and three of Jonathan's points make me think of the management of the apartment building where I have been living for two years. As one example, in the fall we get a condescending letter of advance blame reminding us not to open our windows in the winter and thereby let the apartment get so cold the radiators freeze. The first question is, "Who would be dumb enough to do that in New Hampshire?" Unmentioned is the fact that the second floor here is so hot that I never have to turn the heat on all year, and, indeed, do have to open windows in the dead of winter. To solve the problem one would need to figure out what is wrong with the heating or ventilation system, but it's much easier to blame the victim.
  38. 1 point
    Giving William a break, Michael, don't you think he was just being mischievous and recalling the pedo-symbolism awfulness that Letendre has introduced on OL? I did (without asking him to verify) when I replied in the light way I did - I I am glad Roger Stone hates Nazis ! So do I. But covert signalling does appeal to lots of sick people, who vote, and like Trump's famous "good people on both sides" quote, cannot be entirely dismissed I don't think you need to go any slower here.
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    So what you're saying is that Freud was a lobster...
  41. 1 point
    Here are a couple of interesting angles by which to approach the critical work of Frederick Crews ... and any enduring greatness of Freud's work (or 'discoveries' or what have you) ... I was searching the OL archives for previous mentions of Freud and psychoanalysis. The first is from a thread on Thought Field Therapy: Scrutiny is the key term in Jerry's comment, I think. Objective, critical, reality-based inquiry, to my mind. The second excerpt is from a thread touching on Kant. Here Michael takes a moment to lay out key concepts in epistemology -- and a useful discipline in approaching disputes. From the same posting:
  42. 1 point
    Toothless garbage people. They used to be the salt of the Earth, the honorable working man, the blue collar hero, the underdog, the common folk who were the heart and soul of the Democratic party. The Dems shafted them. So they left. And now we see what the Dems always thought of them. Not only that, but now the entire Republican party is defined by the characteristics of the "garbage" that abandoned the Dems. The whole party now is undereducated, toothless trash. They don't know their heads from their asses, and are politically gullible and naive. They're stupid, and don't know how to vote for what's best for them. They became that in one election cycle. Pretty revealing attitudes. J
  43. 1 point
    Just do not start accusing the geese! Some of us do not forget! #stop the Avian Order #justice for Thomas
  44. 1 point
    Bill..the aliens among us are notttt reptilian, they are amphibious! Gawd, get your facts straight! ?
  45. 1 point
    William, That's easy. Anyone who makes fun of the person asking a question is gaslighting. An attempt to understand is one thing. Even overzealous speculation. Mocking people who ask questions and are suspicious of those in power (especially the ones who keep getting caught lying), and attempting to belittle the questioners for what they see and telling them not to believe their lying eyes, is another. That's gaslighting. That's not discussion. That's not an attempt to persuade by reason. That's not an attempt to convince. It's a command to sit down and shut up. This is the way they try to sell manmade climate change, too. Same old shit. Michael
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    William, I actually like it. Especially the characteristics of the protagonist. And if one of the inadvertent effects of the CERN-CLIMATE RAPTURIZER is that it creates a black hole of dark matter, but needs to exist to keep the dark matter growing, the obvious task for the hero is to throw the goddam thing into the black hole. Zip... Black hole closed Problem solved. Mankind saved for today... Michael
  48. 1 point
    Woo-hoo! I saved and saved and saved up till I could afford a speedy, powerful new laptop. This is the result. A pure proof that I can upload two ways, from within my streaming server and straight from the Youtube Creator Studio. Woo-hoo!
  49. 1 point
    William, Sure. I went to my orders completed page at Amazon and typed in "conspiracy" just to make this fast. Four books came up, but I have more (I always haunt used book places, too ). I can't list those right off the bat because I have a crap-load of books and I didn't make a separate section for "conspiracy theory" like I did for Rand, writing, Scientology, evil (a few very interesting books ), religion, etc. Here are the 4: Conspiracies and Secret Societies: The Complete Dossier by Brad Steiger and Sherry Steiger The Believing Brain: From Ghosts and Gods to Politics and Conspiracies---How We Construct Beliefs and Reinforce Them as Truths by Michael Shermer History Decoded: The 10 Greatest Conspiracies of All Time by Brad Meltzer and Keith Ferrell Demented Agitprop: The Myth and Madness of Agenda 21 Conspiracy Theories by Llewellyn Hinkes-Jones On a related note, I recently went through the audiobook: Secret Societies: Inside the Freemasons, the Yakuza, Skull and Bones, and the World's Most Notorious Secret Organizations by John Lawrence Reynolds. And, if I'm not mistaken, I have the print version called "Shadow People," but I can't seem to find it. This is a VERY GOOD book and it has a slant you would like. I have the following in my Amazon wish list. (sigh... I'll get to them some day--I have a way-too-long wish list up on Amazon ) The United States of Paranoia: A Conspiracy Theory by Jesse Walker Voodoo Histories: The Role of the Conspiracy Theory in Shaping Modern History by David Aaronovitch American Conspiracy Theories by Joseph E. Uscinski There are a bunch of others without the "conspiracy" keyword. In fact, I'm trying to remember where I got these titles from. I often look up books in the footnotes of books I am reading and, if I think one is interesting, I try to find it and usually put it on my wish-list if it is for sale at Amazon. I have a Scribd account and I probably have some things separated over there, too. That should do for now. I'm not going to waste a lot of time on this though. I have other priorities right now (creative writing stuff). btw - I just put Suspicious Minds on my wish list. Michael
  50. 1 point
    What a nonsense. According to these criteria astronomy wouldn't be an objective science either. The same can be said of the stars, astronomers can only observe some photons arriving on earth. We can’t directly observe the evolution of a star, so the theories about such stellar evolution aren’t objective science either?