william.scherk
Reading lists, go-to books, Amazon wishes, new on the block editions: MSK and William's recommended books about conspiracy theories ... make perfect Judeo-Christmas non-altruistic gifts! 'Tis the Season (of Reason). From the blurb of Suspicious Minds:

"We’re all conspiracy theorists. Some of us just hide it better than others.

Conspiracy theorists do not wear tin-foil hats (for the most part). They are not just a few kooks lurking on the paranoid fringes of society with bizarre ideas about shape-shifting reptilian aliens running society in secret. They walk among us. They are us. Everyone loves a good conspiracy. Yet conspiracy theories are not a recent invention. And they are not always a harmless curiosity. In Suspicious Minds, Rob Brotherton explores the history and consequences of conspiracism, and delves into the research that offers insights into why so many of us are drawn to implausible, unproven and un-provable conspiracy theories. They resonate with some of our brain’s built-in quirks and foibles, and tap into some of our deepest desires, fears, and assumptions about the world."

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Message added by william.scherk

Reading: "Suspicious Minds: Why We Believe Conspiracy Theories"

I want to recommend a book I just started reading last night: "Suspicious Minds," by Rob Brotherton. As is usual, I read first the chapter that stuck out -- Chapter 5, The Paranoid Fringe. It takes a useful critical look at the seminal article by Richard Hofstadter -- "The Paranoid Style in American Politics" -- and also runs to ground a plausible origin of 'tinfoil hats.' 

The book is written in a wry conversational tone, and is not on the surface a ''scholarly" read thick with endless footnotes, but it also contains a very useful reference list by page number -- as well as a full index at the back.  (My copy is from our local library, but I am going to order it from Amazon so I always have it on hand as a reference book.)

Here is an excerpt from the first page that might whet OLer's appetite for more ...

Quote

allisnitasitseems.png

In a fit of recursion, I include this bit of commentary from earlier this month. It suggests that I am bound by ingrained prejudice/s, which may or may not be true ... yet leaves the door open to further friendly discussion.

On 10/15/2017 at 1:12 PM, Michael Stuart Kelly said:

For those who still don't know how to process conspiracy theorists, I left the following comment over at William's blog the other day (see here). He didn't agree that it was a valid approach (it's hard to let go of a prejudice once ingrained :) ), but that is the way listening to conspiracy theorists works with people like me. And from the looks of things, it works that way with a shit-ton of people all over America.

-- for those who like to check out reviews before purchasing or borrowing from a library, here's a selection -- which I thought remarkable. Remarkable in the sense of "how many reviews do not mention Donald Trump?"

New York Times review by Adrian Chen
Inside Higher Education review by Scott McLemee
Brief Scientific American review by Maria Temming

-- for the benefit of Dear Leader, I found the book is available at his local library too!

MSKevanstonLibarySuspiciousMinds.png



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Pronounced Joe King

In a Pittsburgh accent, with a Salena Zito tone, "Did you watch the video?"

On 11/9/2018 at 2:29 PM, Michael Stuart Kelly said:
On 11/9/2018 at 1:12 PM, william.scherk said:
On 10/30/2018 at 1:58 PM, Michael Stuart Kelly said:
On 10/30/2018 at 10:06 AM, william.scherk said:

This is rather a chilling video ... especially the Soros collection. Witch-doctors, Attilas, (((Globalists))). [Link: Conspiracy Theorists Cringe Compilation ]

For who? 

The view stats are not encouraging, so it can't be chilling for many people out there in the general public...

I wonder what we call a small club of very few members who posture as saviors and purport to save the world against widespread evil... 

Objectivist Living ... 

Since no one else even hints at this, you just said it, and everyone on OL speaks for himself or herself (did you miss that memo, hmmmm? :) ), I have to say I am very surprised you admit to posturing as a savior of mankind and trying to save the world against widespread evil from OL. 

We can be heroes, Michael, if just for one day ...

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Regarding the conspiracy theory mindset, might it have a least some basis in survival value -- something like an intuitive or subconscious appreciation or sense of the concept of the Tenth Man Rule? The stampeding herd has been massively more dangerous than "kooks" who believe what appears to be (and more often than not is) nonsense. So, perhaps the question should be if the conspiracy theory mindset might actually be beneficial, rather than studied and treated as a defect or ailment?

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On 11/15/2018 at 2:49 PM, Jonathan said:

Regarding the conspiracy theory mindset, might it have a least some basis in survival value -- something like an intuitive or subconscious appreciation or sense of the concept of the Tenth Man Rule?

I recommend reading Brotherton's book. "It's Not Them, It's Us" is my distillation of his central message.

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1 hour ago, william.scherk said:

I recommend reading Brotherton's book. "It's Not Them, It's Us" is my distillation of his central message.

Alright. I'll look into it. Thanks.

J

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Thanks, again, Billy.

I'm still curious, though, if the book contains what I was asking about. From reading a few reviews, it appears that it might, or that it might not.

From the initial blurb atop this thread:

"Rob Brotherton explores the history and consequences of conspiracism..."

Are positive consequences included?

How is "conspiracism" defined and identified? Does the author identify a bright-line between speculation/tentative belief and certainty, or something, or what? 

"...and delves into the research that offers insights into why so many of us are drawn to implausible, unproven and un-provable conspiracy theories. They resonate with some of our brain’s built-in quirks and foibles..."

Why call them "quirks and foibles"? The author writes that he has taken a neutral approach to his subject, that it's not about condemnation, but yet traces of condemnation appear to remain. Attributes which may or may not be features are suspected as being bugs, or at least language is poorly chosen to leave that flavoring.

Am I wrong?

J

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1 hour ago, Jonathan said:

How is "conspiracism" defined and identified? Does the author identify a bright-line between speculation/tentative belief and certainty, or something, or what?

brothertonExtract4J.png

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Why call them "quirks and foibles"?

Why not?  There are multiple connotations of both words. 

Quote

The author writes that he has taken a neutral approach to his subject, that it's not about condemnation, but yet traces of condemnation appear to remain

I have quirks and foibles of thinking, pattern-seeking, attributing motive or intention, proportionality, suspicion and more.  Some may be because I am a 'deranged lying leftist scumbag,' or 'gaslighting asshole,' some may not.

Condemnation of mere foibles or quirks could seem a bit over-zealous.  Folks here may have a better appreciation of Brotherton's argument and its own quirks and foibles by approaching the book a little bit closer. I can't claim to be its best interpreter.

Here is quirky Liz Crokin commentary that may provide a living example of several biases or 'quirks' of thinking Brotherton gets into in his book.

I can also re-include this short video presentation. It introduces several quirks.

Courtesy Center for Inquiry.

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23 hours ago, william.scherk said:

Why not?  There are multiple connotations of both words.

Because it sounds like loaded language, rather than truly neutral terms. It sounds as if, despite the authors stated intentions of avoiding judgementalism, he is possibly still imposing predetermined expectations and judgments.

So, again, the question for me is whether or not the "consequences" of "conspiracism" covered in the book include positive ones, or at least the search for their possible existence.

btw, my questions here aren't intended to be argumentative. I tasted the appetizers, was enticed by them, and then had questions about the meal before considering committing to it. Based on your answers, or lack thereof, to certain of my questions, it sounds as if the book probably doesn't go as far and deep as I'd prefer.

Thanks for the feedback. I'm interested, but not enough yet to order the steak.

J

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Soy, Soyer, Soyest ... what has happened to the valuable agricultural product from the Farm Belt?

On 7/9/2018 at 12:11 PM, william.scherk said:
On 7/8/2018 at 10:18 AM, WSS, quoting some Soy Elite Farmer Communists said:

“Soybeans are the top agriculture export for the United States, and China is the top market for purchasing those exports,” Heisdorffer said in the statement.

So ... ?

On 7/8/2018 at 10:24 AM, Michael Stuart Kelly said:

Nothing wrong with soy beans unless you think they are virtue and steak is evil.

Exactly.  Soyer is quite likely evul.  Since much of the US crop is rotting, all's well that ends well, right? From a week ago:

The incredible U.S.-to-China soybean nosedive, in one chart

c1702c5d4d0c06c957fb06752b4ca7e0

 

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On 2/4/2018 at 1:23 AM, Jon Letendre said:
You don’t want to be a young black man staying overnight with Ed Buck
 
 
No investigation, though. And so, like with bodies falling off the orgy rooftop Standard Hotel, if there’s is no investigation, then it was purely self-inflicted, and if it was purely self-inflicted, there is no point in any investigation.
 
Here is Ed Buck with Adam Schiff
 
IMG_7268.jpg

Oh shit, it happened again ...

https://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-ed-buck-west-hollywood-death-20190107-story.html

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On 2/4/2018 at 1:23 AM, Jon Letendre said:
You don’t want to be a young black man staying overnight with Ed Buck
 
 
No investigation, though. And so, like with bodies falling off the orgy rooftop Standard Hotel, if there’s is no investigation, then it was purely self-inflicted, and if it was purely self-inflicted, there is no point in any investigation.
 
Here is Ed Buck with Adam Schiff
 
IMG_7268.jpg

Murderous weirdo and huge Democratic fund raiser pal of Senator Liddle Adam Schitt has finally been arrested. This third victim didn’t even die, but something has changed in California.

“LOS ANGELES – Ed Buck, a prominent Democratic Party donor, was arrested Tuesday and charged with operating a drug house after a third man reportedly suffered an overdose inside his West Hollywood home last week and survived.

These fetishes include supplying and personally administering dangerously large doses of narcotics to his victims,” the prosecutors wrote, according to the Times.”

I think he may be playing charades. The answer phrase is See You in 2020.

buck.jpeg?ve=1&tl=1

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.foxnews.com/us/major-democratic-donor-ed-buck-arrested-charged-with-running-drug-den.amp

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I just glanced at William’s article but I did read about this phenomenon several years ago. Repressed memories do exist but the therapy to retrieve them leads to false memories being easily “created.” It must be researched and studied more so “suggestions” are not implanted into children’s and adult’s brains. After the “false suggestion of a memory” is implanted the human subject will embroider upon it creating a false and sometimes destructive narrative about things that never happened. That sounds like brainwashing and the novel, “1984.”

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21 hours ago, william.scherk said:

Freshly published in Perspectives on Psychological Science, Elizabeth Loftus, Steven Jay Lynn and Scott O Lilienfeld are joined with several other authors for "The Return of the Repressed: The Persistent and Problematic Claims of Long-Forgotten Trauma.'  Full text PDF is unlocked at the Sage site.

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So CIA was kidding when they acknowledged the MK Ultra program fifty years ago?

They just felt like admitting to things that are make-believe?

Do you know anything at all about the history and practices or the extent, the number of US and Canadian universities and hospitals that participated or discoveries made? 

It seems you know nothing at all about it, or you would be too embarrassed to even post this.

You really wouldn’t rather learn something first, then post?

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Visual pastiche on the "Greenbaum Speech," a touchstone of theory undergirding iatrogenic harms in therapy, during the Satanic Ritual Abuse memory wars. Key words: Corydon Hammond, Bennett Braun, Judith Peterson.

 

  • Haha 1

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No such thing as MK then, ok got it. And further, no such thing as satanic ritual abuse.

Working hard for the coven, Billy — you deserve another promotion.

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