Blogs

 

Mark Goes To Church! (to Record The Organ, Silly!)

Jul 15 2005, 02:26 AM I just got back from the Cathedral in Hartford, CT where I heard the Austin organ demonstrated for me by the assistant music director. This is one of the larger cathedrals in the eastern US. We talked about numerous recording possibilities, including orchestrating unconventional renditions and adapting them to the organ (ie, a piece normally played by an orchestra, adapted to organ). I also spoke to the organist, who lit up when I mentioned the great Bavo Organ in the Netherlands, and my experience with it by proxy of having bought the Post Organ Toolkit samples for my Kurzweil. The organist at this church has played the Bavo organ! He's been around the world and all over Europe, performing. He gave me a copy of a recording that someone had made for the fortieth year dedication of the church (it was built in 1962) and I am listening to Widor's Symphonie V. He is darned good! He's got the sense of passion in his performance, so I have no issues with the performance or the cathedral acoustics. The issues that the assistant music director raised were that, depending on the season, the stained glass windows rattle when the 32' stops are played. I noted this too during the demonstration. His solution to mask this was to add some 16' and 8' mix to enrich the harmonic overtones and cover some of the rattling. It was not too bad, actually. My overall impression is that the organ wasn't as loud as I had expected. The 32' pedals, even full out, didn't cause my heart to stop, or cause difficulty breathing, the way I would listen to organ on my own custom sound system. So I have some rethinking to do about how I adjust my playback system for organ music. Perhaps fourteen 18" woofers is way overkill for reproducing 16Hz. At any rate, the assistant music director explained to me that this organ is not so much suited to Baroque as to modern and French impressionist music, because of the way the voicing works. He explained that in contrast to a mechanical organ of Bach's era, this Austin, built in 1962, uses electro magnetic switching (solenoids) to actuate the valves that let air into the pipes. The mechanical organs could actually, through the way the organist presses the keys, vary the flow of air and affect the way each pipe 'speaks'. The more modern electro-actuated organs have no such controlability, and are more like a MIDI keyboard that has no velocity sensing. The tone of the organ is quite nice though a bit darker than most that I've heard. I think it's possibly due to the immense size of this cathedral (108' ceiling, 298' length of the gallery) that the higher frequencies are being absorbed. After the demo, we talked about the prospect of a commercial release. He liked the idea. And he invited me to come again when they have a full symphony orchestra and a 300-person choir performing. The Altar is large enough to encompass a full symphonic orchestra. And we talked about the prospect of expanding beyond just making organ recordings, to doing other types of music involving orchestral performances. The possibilities make me feel giddy! Everyone was friendly and seemed delighted that someone was taking an interest in making a serious recording. I did have my expectations rather high, especially after he told me that the 32' pedal is loud enough to overload the Neumann U-87s that they have flown from the gallery. My experience with it was that at floor level the 32' stops were quite tame. Perhaps I have to get my mics way up there to get the sound. Working a venue this size with 8 mics is going to involve a mammoth amount of cable! Especially if I get fancy and decide to mount some extra mics up in the catwalk at the 108' level! Just getting around this cathedral requires a degree of physical agility--many flights of stairs just to get to the choir loft where the organ controls are. They asked to see examples of my work, and fortunately, I have just completed a symphony concert 3 weeks ago, and pressed the rough evaluation DVD for the client. With the client's permission, I will forward a copy to the Church for review. This is looking very promising. Great cathedral, great organist, and a top-notch organ to record. It sounds rather like the one in Toulouse, France, but darker in tone. If I can figure out where the 32' tones reinforce, I'll have a winning combination. The recording they made 3 years ago seems to dominate around 60hz and there is barely any 16hz fundamental to be found on it. I hope that I can do better. Perhaps I'll bring an oscilloscope and attach it to the output of my MotU 896 and have the organist play the lowest of the 32' pedals while I move a mic around and look for the highest ratio of fundamental. I know that all acoustic spaces have areas where they reinforce the lowest notes. What remains to be done is to prepare a repetoire and contracts and decide what the object of the recording session is to be. One thing is evident: this is going to be exciting and enjoyable!

mweiss

mweiss

 

A Symphony Can Be Uplifting

Apr 19 2005, 04:47 AM Last Friday night (4/15), I attended a dress rehearsal of a regional symphony orchestra. I was there for the purpose of preparing for the early stages of a possible recording contract; ie., getting familiar with the venue, the orchestra and the politics of it all. This particular night, the orchestra was preparing for a performance of La Traviata in concert form. I sat in the middle of the front row of an otherwise nearly empty theater of 2000 seats, with nothing but my notepad and a pen, assiduously taking notes, sketching diagrams of the stage and noting possible microphone and camera locations. Now and then, I would get a curious glance from the conductor, the tenor soloist and some of the violinists and cellists who were closest to the front of the stage. Little did they know that I was there on a mission to provide them a gift of incomparable value, pending my doing a superb job of negotiating the deal. I will have to negotiate a deal with my best powers of conveying the concept of mutual benefit. This is a union orchestra. As such, I have to sell them on the concept that my recording will benefit them in numerous ways. I had some brief conversations with a staff person for this orchestra, along with some lengthier e-mails, where I proposed some ideas and she quickly shot them down. I see that there are some restrictive limitations that I will have to find a way to negotiate my way out of, in order to make this project the success that it ought to be. Getting back to the rehearsal, it was an uplifting experience. The orchestra was only rehearsing, but each time they played a phrase, or started from a particular bar, they played like a well-oiled machine, with precision and effortless finesse. The orchestra sounded like a fine classical recording--note perfect, no sour notes, not a glitch in the tempo. In one break, the conductor was explaining to the horn section how he wanted a certain staccato style of playing and with a bit more emphasis on certain bars. He didn't use much technical terminology, but instead made sounds to imitate what he wanted the horn players to do. I found that rather amusing. There were three vocal soloists in this opera: a baritone, tenor and a soprano. All were excellent, although I could tell who was familiar and who was not familiar with the music. The rehearsal started at 7:30pm and ended on the dot of 10:30pm, when the conductor thanked the players. All during this time, I had walked the auditorium looking for electrical outlets (there were none), and determining best locations for camera angles. The theater is in an old building, but it had recently been renovated and was in nearly pristine condition. The acoustics were very good. I found my way up to the balconey and walked the width of it, glancing at the stage and imagining what kind of lens would best get the shots. Then I returned to the main floor and went back to my seat, scribbled some more notes on my pad and continued to watch the busy hive of people during intermission. Each session was about an hour and fifteen minutes. I note that 90-minute tapes will be a tight fit and that any unmanned cameras will have to be started up a few minutes in advance of the show. The orchestra chair announced the 4-minute warning before the next session was to start. I found my liason contact person and she asked me what I thought of the orchestra and venue so far. I expressed positive impressions and that I had come up with some ideas on where to place cameras and microphones. She introduced me to the stage manager, and he suggested a possible position for a camera to cover the conductor, and that the stage set had a trap door that could be opened for this purpose. Time was short and the orchestra was about to begin, so I went back to the center, but this time the third row. I wanted to get a better sense of the sound from further back, as the front row had too much separation from the soloists on the left and right sides of the stage. Third row, center, was much better, sounding more like stereo. If I had my druthers, this is where I'd place the 'microphone tree' (I coined the term because the framework of the support mechanism holds five microphones for 5-channel surround sound and as such, looks a little bit like a mechanical tree). In reality, given the extremely tight requirements and restrictions, I have a hunch that they won't allow such a contraption in the important real estate of the third row. I'll most likely end up with eight microphones in an arc surrounding the conductor's podium. That would be a more intimate sound, but not like the sound the audience would hear. The orchestra played as they worked on more sections of the piece. It was a nice, pleasing sound, not very loud, but not too soft either. It was drier than one would hear in a recording, but very smooth and detailed. And the different sounds coming from various directions across the stage made for a fascinating sonic experience. I noted that cellos can play in much higher ranges of scale than I had assumed til now. I thought they sounded rather like violas than cellos at times. And then there were the voices. The tenor had amazing room-filling volume. Amazing, I thought.. there is no amplification, but this man's voice projected almost as if hundreds of watts of amplification were assisting it. Actually, all three vocalists were something extraordinary. The rehearsal and 10:30pm came all too quickly. But the memory of the music and the uplifting nature of seeing scores of musicians perform their magic together, demonstrated one of the highest levels of civilization. Here was man doing his finest accomplishments in the world of esthetics. The musicians were all people that had worked hard for many years to achieve their level of skill. And yet they played with such ease as to belie their effort, their playng seeming as natural as breathing is to any living creature. By the end of the night, and on the drive home, I felt energized, uplifted. Classical music, performed live, by virtuosic-level musicians is a unique and valuable experience. Seeing a concert of this variety is something that every intelligent human being owes himself. It is the expression of man's highest values.

mweiss

mweiss

 

"state Of Fear"

Apr 9 2005, 03:58 AM I just finished reading State of Fear by Michael Crichton. The book impressed me to a degree. By proxy, he proceeds to demolish the entire fraud of the environmental movement, exposing it for what it is: an apparent means of making a few leaders of the movment rich, while pretending to be doing something noble for humanity. The story had a few moments where "suspension of disbelief" was stretched a bit thin, but overall, he did a very adequate job of building suspense, mystery and resolution. The story initializes with several related but separate events going on with the purchase of technology, as well as the murders of certain scientists. There are good guys and bad guys in this story, as well as a character who goes through an awakening, reluctant at first, but rather commited to change as a result of direct confrontation with the enemies he was supposed to be defending. A picture of how private groups form, accumulate funding and go into action without much government oversight is painted. The groups described in this book are eco-terrorists to the extreme. All throughout, there are characters who, even when presented with the evidence, continue to evade the truth and demonstrate the Catholic version of faith in their cause--a blind following without testing the veracity of the principles they are fighting for. One gets to witness the evils of evasion in pure black & white in this novel. And Crichton backs up his assertions with non-fictional charts from the USGS, NASA and other government and private climate monitoring agencies. The footnotes are real, the story is fictional, which makes for quite an interesting experience. I found myself pausing several times to ponder the charts and think about what a sham this global warming claim is. I also found some nice quotes from time to time. I will have to skim through and write them down. Definately a worthwhile read. Keep an eye on a character named Kenner. He's the objective one in this story. There are others too, but he is the spearhead that works methodically and tirelessly to unravel the mysteries of the eco terrorists plans.

mweiss

mweiss

 

Plaxo Contact Manager And Privacy Concerns

Mar 1 2006, 08:34 PM A couple of years ago, I received a Plaxo invitation from a trusted friend (or was it Plaxo, impersonating him?), so I figured I'd try it, since, well, if he is using it, then it must be safe. So on my system, it's been for two years running. And in the back of my mind, I'm wondering some things that this particular writer, whose article is linked below, is wondering: http://www.meskill.net/archives/000467.html Things really came to a head when I decided to troubleshoot, in earnest, a strange problem with Outlook e-mails getting copied to the Windows clipboard without my doing so. I got a new clipboard utility in FrontPage 2003, which holds 24 clipboard items and reports from the taskbar. Well, I was really alarmed when, as I scrolled through my Inbox in Outlook, the number of items on the clipboard was increasing! Of course, this was not the first time I discovered this. It was a few months ago, while pasting for sale items to a newsgroup, and clicking on Inbox to let the news server do its thing and clear a logjam, I noticed that the very next thing I pasted was not the for sale item text, but the first e-mail in Inbox! Today I decided to get to the bottom of it. After numerous virus scans turning up nothing, I realized that Plaxo was the only odd thing here. So I took it out today. So what happened? The clipboard behavior stopped. No longer are my inbox messages being auto-copied to clipboard. Now this makes me wonder, if that was happening because of Plaxo, could it be that Plaxo is collecting a lot more than address info? Could every e-mail I've clicked on be copied to some computer in the Plaxo corporate building? Enquiring minds want to know! So I am putting out the word that Plaxo does some strange things to your Outlook software and that data privacy MIGHT be compromised.

mweiss

mweiss

 

Graphics/a/v/multimedia--where Has The Money Gone?

Mar 22 2006, 03:54 AM I've been making a concerted effort to find work in my area of talent and experience, relating to computer technology this year, and I'm coming back from it all, very frustrated. For example, job postings on Elance.com are attracting very low--ridiculously-low--bids. And the companies that post these projects have absurdly-small budgets. Who the hell can produce a 36-page 4C catalogue for $236?? Other jobs involve fairly advanced 3D graphics modeling and animation, again, paying just a few hundred dollars! It seems that the only jobs that are budgeting close to $1,000 are the ones where you must build an entire e-commerce site, including setting up the database, front end, PHP/MySQL scripting--the works. Basically, any of these jobs would have me working at a couple of dollars an hour if I could bid on them (to do that, I must take out the credit card and sign up for a monthly fee just to get the bare minimum privilages to bid on the few jobs that might both be within my grasp and earn enough money that I'd be earning more than the gas station attendant. Back in the late 1980s through the early '90s, graphic design work paid well. It was hard to get, but the jobs I did get paid well. For example, $5,000 to lay out a VHS cassette sleeve and 4C/1C sell sheet. Later, that project price offering was reduced to $1500 for the same work and later, $1350. I still did well, and the multiple VHS jobs paid $3,000 and took me just a few hours to complete. With the cost of film, 4C seps, 3M color proofs considered, I was earning $128/hr back in those days. My last good jobs was designing faceplates for a kiosk marketing firm that positioned coupon printing kiosks at stores like Caldor's, Bradlee's and K-Mart. I averaged about $100/hr producing full color ads and B&W coupon layouts for each product offering, and often cranked out 8-10 ads a day. The firm that hired me also had an in-house staff of five designers, who, collectively, produced about 12-15 ads per day total output. I streamlined my work, used state of the art hardware to maximize efficiency and was able to produce excellent faceplates that passed their quality control inspections every time. And I was earning thousands a week. Unfortunately, that firm went bankrupt in the middle of my subcontracting with them and left me with $6400 in unpaid invoices. But the money was great while it lasted and I worked my tail off, pacing myself and always trying to surpass my earlier benchmarks of performance and quality of work. After 1995, all I got were scraps and it's been downhill since. In 1997, I reluctantly went into broadcast radio engineering as a constract service provider, risking my life climbing towers and working around high voltages in all kinds of weather. Suddenly, I was racking up 800+ miles/week on the car, and earning only $25/hr. After meeting up with a former FCC inspector one afternoon, whom I'd subcontracted to do a specific task for a client, he convinced me to increase my rates, seeing I was driving a 17 year old clunker for transportation and after having a frank conversation about rates. He was charging $75/hr in the MN area and $150/hr for consulting he did that involved flying to distant locations. Over the next 4 years, I gradually raised my rate to $50/hr. I lost some clients in the process, the Hispanic stations refused to pay that rate, but I was working fewer hours for better quality clients and earning more money. For about 2 years, that was paying the bills pretty well. Then the radio market started to dive in 2003 and owners could no longer afford maintenance, so my hours of employment dipped. The wife took a manufacturing job just to help make ends meet and because she wanted some nice things that her friends have, like furniture, a better car, etc. So now, with skyrocketing electricity and fuel costs wiping out what was left of a retirement account that was already wiped out by four years of five-figure property tax bills after some recent revaluations tripled the taxes, our comfort of life is all but gone. Radio is just not cutting it, and I don't love the commutes at all. I'm getting on in years and need to find work that is less physically-demanding. So I'm revisiting computer graphics, my passion, along with sound & multimedia. But I'm discovering that it's no longer paying a living wage. These companies, and the people that bid on the jobs, must be living in a bubble. Who would bid on a job at $236 that involves at least 30-35 hours of work? It's unrealistic. There must be a lot of kids out there who are providing the cheap labor. Back in the days when I was actively involved, and you needed a $15,000 Mac Quadra 950 to do anything respectable, you got paid real money. I was heavily invested in software and hardware, spending as much as $4995 for a graphics card alone, $15,000 for animation software, thousands more for photo and page layout applications, etc. And I was able to make a profit and pay off the loans. Today, I couldn't pay a property tax bill on the income I'm expected to make with referral jobs from places like Elance. This can't be real! I must be missing something somewhere. Surely there are REAL graphics/multimedia projects that pay in the thousands, where it's possible to earn $60 or more an hour after expenses are considered, but where?? It seems that the people who are well off have a lot of investment real estate, own radio stations and live off the ad revenue, or are Wall Street day traders, like my neighbor. Everyone else is slogging along working two menial jobs and popping pills just to stay awake on the job. I have another neighbor who's in the latter unfortunate situation, and they look haggard and worn out way too early for their years. So where are all the good jobs? Where is the money at these days? Is there some top-secret society of graphics people that get to choose from an elite pool of clients that I don't know about? Or are all the great animations and graphics we see on television being done by poor fools earning less than $7/hour? I'm under a lot of pressure to increase my income, as it seems that local government is tightening its grip around the necks of it's victims taxpayers. I need a steady $60/hr income to keep the wolves at bay, but I'm not finding it online these days. Spammers easily surpass that. I'm sure too that the scammers and credit card thieves are enjoying a lifestyle I'll never achieve again. But where is the money for honest, hard-working designers, multimedia enthusiasts and video/sound professionals? The local market has been a series of closed doors. It seems the industrial door to door sales is dead. Why am I finding myself selling off all my precious items on ebay just to come up with bill money each month? My income is shifting away from real work and more toward coming from PayPal deposits. But I have a finite number of items to sell off and when they are gone, that income stops. Before that happens, I had hoped that some of these referral services were the solution to the income problem. But from what I've seen perusing the rather paltry selection of projects up for bid, and the pathetic price range of these bids, I am feeling an impending sense of financial doom. Fifty years ago, a man could work a simple wage job, have a decent home, a wife at home that cooked and cleaned and raised the kids and gave them proper love and attention, and life was good. Today, we both have to work, and there still isn't enough money to pay the bills and the taxes both. And the wages for both full-time jobs as well as consulting 'job shop' work have tanked. My wife's company's new CEO is withholding this year's raises indefinately. The whole situation leaves me pronostacating that the proverbial excrement is about to collide with the rotating propeller.

mweiss

mweiss

 

A Painless Root Canal?

Mar 30 2005, 12:08 AM I went to the dentist today to have a long-needed root canal done. This is part of a series of things I am doing to get myself physically feeling better. The mind, in order to function well, must be supported by a body that is functioning well. I've had trouble with a certain back molar for a few years now. It usually flared up twice a year, but it was becoming more frequent this year, so I decided it is time. My dentist is probably on of the best around. He's actually quite rational. We have had conversations about politics. He dislikes socialism and could cite me examples of how Canada's socialized medicine is an utter failure. I've spoken Objectivist ideas to him in the past and again today. He doesn't disagree, but listens and sometimes agrees. There is hope for this man. He's not only an excellent and focused practitioner of his trade, but he also is compassionate and genuinely cares about his patients. I remember my first visit to his office, on the referal of a longtime friend: my tooth emergency came in the middle of a snowstorm. I called my new dentist, and he stayed after work to take care of my emergency, even though he did not know me well as a patient. I make it my first priority among creditors, to pay him first. He does amazing work. Within his field, he is highly rational, focused and innovative. Yes, an innovative dentist. What do I mean by that? I mean that he is never satisfied with the status quo methods. He strudies new techniques constantly. He finds ways to do the job better, in fewer visits and with less pain for the patient. In contrast to my former dentist (who must have had a contempt for his patients, for his methods involved tools of torture and excuses for not using anesthesia in areas where he lacked the ability.) This was my second root canal by my current dentist. I had one by another dentist ten years ago. That one lived up to the horrible image of what a root canal can be. The two that my current dentist performed were nearly painless. At the slightest signal of discomfort, he would shift tactics, determine whether it was the file he was using, or whether it was time to add more anesthesia to the root pulp. And the work would progress and I could hear the file grinding in the canal, but felt nothing. One the whole, the most discomfort was keeping my mouth wide open for an hour and trying not to choke on my own saliva. Hardly anything one could call pain. So I am done with phase one. I go back for a post next week, and maybe a crown, when I can afford it. Second random thought: It would be relatively easy to turn Anthem into a movie. Being a short story, and the nature of it not involving costly effects, all we'd need is a location that fits the visual imagery of the novel, and a group of dedicated actors. This movie could be shot with digital video. I know how to do this. I know how to edit, and how to author it into a DVD. It would be a fascinating project. Of course the logistics would be another story.

mweiss

mweiss

 

Anthem

March 29 2005 The last time I read Anthem was the autumn of 1968. I did not fully understand it then, as I was much younger and had less context by which to reference the work. Tonight, it was my intention to continue reading a Michael Crichton book that I had just purchased, however, thinking about how I might introduce my wife to Objectivism in a series of small, pleasant steps, I went to my Sacred Books, which I keep in a place out of reach of all but myself, at the top of the bookcases. I took inventory of the books which I have read so long ago, the books written by the hand of Ayn Rand. And thee it was, Anthem. I thought, "this would be simple to read" (for my wife's first language is not English) and it is a story that she could comprehend. I stood there, in front of the bookcases, intending to skim through Anthem and refresh my memory a bit. That was many hours ago. For I have fallen again to the almost mystical power of Miss Rand's writing. I read the book in its entirety, while standing there. Yes, I was standing. It did not matter. I was too engaged in the story to think about the status of my body, it's position, or any discomfort I might have felt from standing for many hours. I read the novel, and became completely absorbed in it once again, this time with the conceptual ability of an adult mind, which allowed me to experience the novel in a manner that I had not experienced it when I was much younger and possessed less wisdom. The wording of the last two chapters of Anthem struck me as the most eloquent words I can remember reading. More elegant and graceful than any scripture I have read, more meaningful and fundamental than any poetry I have read. The words had the immediacy of innocent discovery--of Truth. They were simple. Axiomatic. Their beauty was in their directness, unadulterated by meaningless fluff so often found in "great" works of literature. There is no longer any question in my mind as to the greatness of literary work by Ayn Rand. I have always been in awe of her philosophy, but now, in my elder years, I am in awe of her way of expressing ideas.

mweiss

mweiss

 

First Entry

Hey, wutsup, this is my blog. Basically I'm not sure how much substance will be on this, probably a fair amount though. I'll also use this to post updates on my baseball team and funny snippets from conversations I have that I like. My baseball team is 1-1. I had a conversation with my sister yesterday that was real funny. It went something like this. Her: Why would you not worship a God that can accomplish so much that man can't? Me: Because I don't think that's possible. Her: Well can man fly without machines? Me: Well can God create a boulder so big not even he can lift it? Her: Why would he need to? Me: Why would man? I'll probably rant some on here too, nothing is coming right now though. What does the publish button do? OOOOOO, I needa click that huh....

Danneskjold

Danneskjold

 

Losing it

OK... time to lose some weight. I am tired of getting old and fat and achy. I joined Weight Watchers and got myself a Tony Little Gazelle Sprintmaster. I'm just starting out and I am motivated and ready to work towards a goal of losing around 30-35 pounds. I will occasionally write about my progress as it is supposed to help keep me on track and motivated. Kat

Kat

Kat

 

My Blog Links

Below are links to my two blogs. On my main blog, "Zenwind," the Climbing Log is a historical recounting of my more memorable rock and ice climbs, most of which happened in the 1970s, 80s and 90s. They are often epic adventures that I record partly as instructional material with advice for newer climbers. I also have what I consider to be my more important reviews of books and movies. Use the "Index" to navigate the various categories. This is a slowly updated but more permanent blog. . The second blog, "Zenwind's Musings," is to be updated more often. It was mainly started to let family and friends know that I was still kicking and writing while Bangkok was seeing violence in the streets. Any minor reviews will be here, as well as random updates. I'm probably only writing to myself there, but it keeps the fingers nimble. . -Ross Barlow. . "Zenwind": Climbing Log & reviews: http://zenwind.blogspot.com . “Zenwind’s Musings”: my blog recording recent thoughts and/or adventures: http://zenwindmusings.blogspot.com .

Ross Barlow

Ross Barlow

 

Blogging and linking to your current Blog from OL

The Community Blog module allows you to create a personal BLOG (also known as weblog). Creating a Blog In your User Control Panel (My Controls), you will see a Community Blog menu group. To create a Blog click on Blog Settings. When authorized you can create your Blog by agreeing to the Blog Terms and Rules. You will be asked to provide a name for your Blog and a description (optional). You are able to choose between a local and external Blog. Local Blog: A Blog hosted on the board which includes all features to create entries, comments, content blocks, etc. Link to external Blog: A link to a Blog which is hosted elsewhere. When you click 'Finish' your Blog will be created. Blog settings When you have an active Blog, there will be more settings available in the User Control Panel. Your Blog Settings: Here you can setup your Blog, Customize the look of your Blog and create entry categories. Content Block Settings: From this screen you can manage your content blocks (the little blocks of information that are displayed on the left or right side of your Blog page). About Me Settings: From this screen you can enter information which will be displayed on your Blog's About Me screen. Community Blog List When clicking on the 'Blogs' link on the links bar you will be taken to the Community Blog list page. This page displays all available Blogs with some information about them. Both external and internal Blogs are shown. The screen also includes some search and filter options. Clicking on a Blog's name will take you to that Blog. Adding entries to your Blog (local Blogs only) When you go to your Blog you have a special content block called 'Your Blog Options'. This contains links to manage your Blog. Click on Add Entry to add an entry to your Blog. You will be provided with a post form, including all the options you are used to when posting a topic in Invision Power Board. You can post the entry as Draft (not yet viewable by other members/guests) or Published (viewable by all who are allowed to view your Blog). Adding comments to Entries When clicking on a Blog entry name or the comments link of an entry, you will be taken to the entry view page. This page contains a quick reply form, or you can click on the Add Comment button to be able to add a comment to the Blog entry. Happy bloggin' Kat

Kat

Kat

 

Checking out the Blog feature

Now I've got a blog..... and writer's block. hmmm... what did I accomplish today? Today I finally installed a new sound card in my computer. My computer has been without sound for awhile because the sound card was busticated. It was the first time I have ever opened up a PC. I know that sounds odd, but I was a Mac person for several years and only came over to the dark side about two years ago. PC people tend to tinker under the hood a lot more. It really wasn't that difficult at all. I should have just replaced the sound card long ago. The worst part was getting the darned case open. Now I've got my Soundblaster and new Bose speakers and its all good! Kat

Kat

Kat

 

Jean Simmons

We had two famous actors die recently. Jean Simmons was a British actress in the 40ths,50ths and 60ths. She appeared in Oliver's Hamlet, Elmer Gantry, The Happy Ending among others. I think she always did solid work but never got the critical acclaim she deserved. Watch the coming retrospective on TCM.

Chris Grieb

Chris Grieb