Jules Troy

Starting a new thread, Fine Art America

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My own interpretation of fine art as pertains to wildlife photography is my own method of minimalism.  Isolate and simplifying my compositions.  Choosing fstop to get just enough depth of field (that owl was shot at f3.5).  The other very important step is post work production.  Not only for accentuation of what was captured but bringing out the midtones, selecting the right white balance etc to convey the mood.  A balance of detail and noise reduction when processing higher ISO captures etc.

Jonathan just a heads up, usually FAA offers free shipping for a day or two around thanks giving.  On larger pieces that can certainly add up and even allow one to get a larger size for the same money!  I will keep you posted when that becomes available!

oh and Bob.

"I mean it when I say it: this is what photography is all about. It’s about getting prints made, getting them framed, hanging them on a wall. That’s where you’re gonna get your real satisfaction in photography"

Edited by Jules Troy

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1 hour ago, Jonathan said:
2 hours ago, william.scherk said:

[fine art defined, sloppily:] some congeries of skill, talent, dedication, education, understanding and carefully applied effort. 

So, we're back to where we always land, which is on the question that the Objectivist arts guru-wannabes always evade: If we are to be truly objective and rational, then before listening to guru-wannabes' judgments of artists' skills, talents, education, understanding, effort, etc., shouldn't we first demand that the guru-wannabes provide us with objective proof of their fitness to make such judgments?

I like using the artistry of our Jules as a metric:  skill and talent developed along an axis of personal goals, a vocational dedication to the artform, self-education in myriad technical tools, building an understanding of the historical sweep and high benchmarks of his specialty. The carefully applied effort to stand alone for umpteen hours, and the ability to select for perfection ... 

It is fine with me if the Kamhi/Torres axis continues to carp and grizzle from their point of view and field of influence. Frankly, I care not for them -- their influence is scanty, even if they exemplify a larger social cohort of "It is NOT art, grizzle, minge, whine."  In today's Market for Product, fine arts are generally distinguished by their near-psychotic valuations at auction. There is nothing, nothing, nothing that the axis can do to budge the art world one millimetre.

Where we sometimes land is in instructional or challenging territory. Trying to tie subjectivity to objectivity by way of art seems to be like a Thomas Miovas Jr Date Nite, to be snide. Never successful and almost always pretty sad. 

Putting on the Snood of Charity, I think anyone's emotional reaction to a work or a genre is data, and so is the philosophical reaction.  It doesn't hurt anyone if tastes differ, and interests are wildly divergent.  Snarking about art is a perennial, and philistines and MFAs can play.

With the snood still on, I would probably pay an Amazon price for an illustrated book by Kamhi/Torres -- but only if it were restricted in its sniffiness to the realm of Objectivish Arts, as appear at Cordair Gallery. That would be a hoot, and likely most instructive.  Most of the Cordair works fit on the shelf Fine Art (by definition, perhaps) and yet many are repulsive to me, mawkish, Kincade-ish, sentimental, boiled free of inspiration and humanity. Like sympathy cards. 

So, if something can be called Fine Art, can I still think of it as awful crap?  You betcha, and little philosophy involved.  And if you disagree with me or the Axis on the merits of Cordair's gallery of fine things, you can always talk to Linda. 

fineart.png

First they came for the Dadaists, then they came for the Abstractors ...

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Thanks William!  

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18 hours ago, william.scherk said:

I like using the artistry of our Jules as a metric:  skill and talent developed along an axis of personal goals, a vocational dedication to the artform, self-education in myriad technical tools, building an understanding of the historical sweep and high benchmarks of his specialty. The carefully applied effort to stand alone for umpteen hours, and the ability to select for perfection ...

"A kid could do that! So IT'S NOT ART!!!! Or at least it's not great art!"

But then we also "objectively" rate Gauguin or Capuletti as worthy of the highest praise, despite the fact that they had the skill levels of kids.

 

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It is fine with me if the Kamhi/Torres axis continues to carp and grizzle from their point of view and field of influence.

Ditto! They're fun. Pointing out their errors and hypocrisy is a good time.

 

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Frankly, I care not for them -- their influence is scanty, even if they exemplify a larger social cohort of "It is NOT art, grizzle, minge, whine."  In today's Market for Product, fine arts are generally distinguished by their near-psychotic valuations at auction. There is nothing, nothing, nothing that the axis can do to budge the art world one millimetre.

Yeah, I've never had any worries that they're having great influence.

 

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Where we sometimes land is in instructional or challenging territory. Trying to tie subjectivity to objectivity by way of art seems to be like a Thomas Miovas Jr Date Nite, to be snide. Never successful and almost always pretty sad.

Heh. :-D

 

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With the snood still on, I would probably pay an Amazon price for an illustrated book by Kamhi/Torres -- but only if it were restricted in its sniffiness to the realm of Objectivish Arts, as appear at Cordair Galler. That would be a hoot, and likely most instructive.

I'd prefer to see a book by them in which they go out into the real world and, using the criteria by which they reject abstract art, test real people's abilities to comply with their requirements in identifying meaningful depth or whatever in the art forms that they accept as valid. (And, so as not to taint the experiments, they should let friendly critics, such as, say, Fred Seddon, who has doubts about music's ability to do what Kamhi requires it to do, choose the pieces of music which will be tested -- obviously there are works in all of the art forms which are pretty overtly expressive to almost all people, so the point would be to select more difficult ones so as not to simply engage in confirmation bias.)

So far, nothing has been shown to qualify as art by K&T's criteria. Nothing! They've asserted that certain works of art legitimate art, just as fans of abstract art have, but they have not yet objectively demonstrated that anything has qualified.

J

Lately I've been noting how many people Kamhi and Torres mention having met or corresponded with who disagree with their views on what is NOT ART!!!™. It takes a special kind of stubbornness to just outright reject and deny the validity of so many people's responses to abstract art, and to continue to assert that they just can't be experiencing the proper amount of deep meaning, and just must be pretending.

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2 hours ago, Jules Troy said:

My own interpretation of fine art as pertains to wildlife photography is my own method of minimalism.  Isolate and simplifying my compositions.  Choosing fstop to get just enough depth of field (that owl was shot at f3.5).  The other very important step is post work production.  Not only for accentuation of what was captured but bringing out the midtones, selecting the right white balance etc to convey the mood.  A balance of detail and noise reduction when processing higher ISO captures etc.

I think there's also much more going on other than merely "simplifying" the compositions. There's a lot of taste involved there, which I think probably has a natural, inherent element, but also is something that took time and effort to acquire.

 

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Jonathan just a heads up, usually FAA offers free shipping for a day or two around thanks giving.  On larger pieces that can certainly add up and even allow one to get a larger size for the same money!  I will keep you posted when that becomes available!

 

Okay, thanks!

J

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It's a never ending journey of refining my eye and being critical of what i delete and what I save!  (Many people would cry seeing what is in my wastebasket!)

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33 minutes ago, Jules Troy said:

It's a never ending journey of refining my eye and being critical of what i delete and what I save!  (Many people would cry seeing what is in my wastebasket!)

The wastebasket properly used is the ensign  of discernment. 

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Haha yessss!

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On June 30, 2016 at 4:53 PM, william.scherk said:

Where we sometimes land is in instructional or challenging territory. Trying to tie subjectivity to objectivity by way of art seems to be like a Thomas Miovas Jr Date Nite, to be snide. Never successful and almost always pretty sad. 

 

Speaking of instructional territory and sadness, after reading your post, I just had to go back and find Junior's explaining non-musician "Miss Rand's" musical theories, and also the space ships in music:

"Now, as Miss Rand explains, music per se does not depict particular entities, their attributes or their actions, but what does happen is that as one listens to a particular work of music (without words,just instruments) the human mind tries to "fill in the blanks" with one's memories and one's imagination. For example, when I listen to Rachmaninoff's Symphony #2, I experience a type of space epic, starting from a sunrise and a rocket standing tall and an astronaut walking towards it and climbing on board. As the music progresses, the rocket takes off, heading for the moon, and as the music plays I see him looking over the instrument board and pressing button to the rhythm of the music. To make a long story short, the final movement is him heading back to earth, entering the earth's atmosphere, with the flames of re-entry adding a sense of danger and excitement and triumphing over these with technology. So, unlike Ayn Rand's description of one's mind searching for a depiction that matches the music, my mind tends to settle on one scene or series of events -- and this is very enjoyable.

"I will say that this does not happen with every type of music I listen to -- it has to match both my psycho-epistemology and my sense of life for me to get this mental effect. I listen to rock while I am driving in my car as background music, and this type of effect does not happen because I have to concentrate on the road. But when I have the time and the quiet surroundings, my mind does search for or create and entities orientation in my imagination. Likewise, there are certain music that brings up great memories for me, like Aerosmith - I Don't Wanna Miss A Thing (Armageddon), which I watched with a girlfriend and it became our theme song. Everytime I hear it, I think of her fondly, even though she rejected me in the long run and married someone else."

Oof!

And, damn, why is there never a skag screeching "Give me a break" when you need one?!

J

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Mostly when I'm driving it's the back roads looking for wildlife so the radio is off.  Except when I'm driving to work then it's that "stuff" Perigo hates.

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http://jestephotography.pixels.com/featured/cedar-waxwing-overlooking-shoulder-jestephotography-ltd.html

Pretty close to full frame, I was about 12-15 feet away.  Very sharp feather detail on his head/neck with a crystal clear eye.

NIKON D4S
Shutter Speed
1/2000 second
Aperture
F/7.1
Focal Length
800 mm
ISO Speed
1000
Date Taken
Jul 11, 2016, 3:34:11 PM
 
Behind the computer.  RAW processed in Capture One Pro 9, exported as 16bit TIFF into photoshop.
slight noise reduction and sharpening, further corrections using luminosity mask curves adjustments. (That was a fun learning curve btw).

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1 hour ago, Jules Troy said:

http://jestephotography.pixels.com/featured/cedar-waxwing-overlooking-shoulder-jestephotography-ltd.html

Pretty close to full frame, I was about 12-15 feet away.  Very sharp feather detail on his head/neck with a crystal clear eye.

NIKON D4S
Shutter Speed
1/2000 second
Aperture
F/7.1
Focal Length
800 mm
ISO Speed
1000
Date Taken
Jul 11, 2016, 3:34:11 PM
 
Behind the computer.  RAW processed in Capture One Pro 9, exported as 16bit TIFF into photoshop.
slight noise reduction and sharpening, further corrections using luminosity mask curves adjustments. (That was a fun learning curve btw).

Dazzling!   I never got much farther than using a Brownie Box Camera.  That is spectacular.  Can you get detail this good with all electronic imaging? 

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Noooo...my lens was about 12000.  Nikon 400mm f2.8E FL. And in this shot I used a 2X teleconverter.  This lens has the closest thing to a perfect MTF chart in a telephoto that has ever been created. (Near perfect light transmission with no chromatic abberation or purple fringing). 

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7 hours ago, Jules Troy said:

How do you know it is a female.   Her privates are  obscured by feathers....

Very nice image. Did you use film or did you use an electronic camera?  

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The males are completely blue, I used my Nikon D4S, 400mm f2.8 and 2X teleconverter(digital )

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I just got the word Jonathan, free shipping is being offered today only, any product, any size.

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/bighorned-ram-avalanche-with-horns-jestephotography-ltd.html

happy shopping!

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http://fineartamerica.com/featured/great-grey-owl-boreal-hunter-jestephotography-ltd.html

A Great Grey Owl.  I drove about 3.5 hours, left at around 3am to get to this spot in the southwestern foothills/boreal forests of Alberta in the HOPES of seeing one.  

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Thanks for looking my man!

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http://fineartamerica.com/featured/bohemian-waxwing-winter-dreams-jestephotography-ltd.html

In my own eyes(at least) this capture with the light conditions and scene transcends "snapshot" and approaches art.

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Thanks Brant!

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