George H. Smith

When I Grow Too Old To Dream

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While searching YouTube for versions of the Romberg/Hammerstein 1934 pop classic, "When I Grow Too Old To Dream," I happened across this video. I can't say exactly why this video appeals to me so much, but it does. The combination of the song (sung by Vera Lynn) with film of the Battle of Britain makes a striking combination.

Ghs

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Those of you who are unfamiliar with Vera Lynn probably have heard her iconic version (1942) of "We'll Meet Again," which was used by Kubrick in the final scene of "Dr. Strangelove."

I first heard this song on the radio when I was very young. When I asked my mother what it was about, she said that it was a favorite tune from WWII. That's all she needed to say; even at my age I understood the implications. I thereafter regarded it as one of the saddest songs imaginable.

Ghs

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I much prefer her White Cliffs of Dover:

A beautiful tune, which I also prefer to her version of "When I Grow Too Old To Dream." I posted the latter video largely because of the beautifully restored film footage.

I think "White Cliffs of Dover" and "We'll Meet Again" were Lynn's two maga-hits of the war years.

Ghs

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Although "Where or When" was written in 1937, its melancholy nature -- which was frequently construed as a commentary on fleeting love affairs -- made it another popular tune during WWII. This version, by Peggy Lee and the Benny Goodman Trio, was recorded in 1941, and I think this was the version that enjoyed the most success during the war.

Peggy Lee and Benny Goodman! Two of the best ever in their respective crafts!

Ghs

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Those of you who are unfamiliar with Vera Lynn probably have heard her iconic version (1942) of "We'll Meet Again," which was used by Kubrick in the final scene of "Dr. Strangelove."

I first heard this song on the radio when I was very young. When I asked my mother what it was about, she said that it was a favorite tune from WWII. That's all she needed to say; even at my age I understood the implications. I thereafter regarded it as one of the saddest songs imaginable.

I remember that song from when I was a kid during the War. I always got a lump in the throat from it.

Ba'al Chatzaf

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