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Some Effective Opening Paragraphs


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#121 Philip Coates

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Posted 16 November 2011 - 03:46 PM

Dudes, I realize that you view me as your authority and guiding light on all matters testicular or literary and are waiting eagerly for my pronunciamentos (that's Italian, ND), but your last tutoring checks have not cleared. And I do have other duties.

2. On the second, the Mark Twain passage, it's a great sentence, hilariously funny. And in this case the run-on grotesque length of it adds to the humor.

1. On the first (the request for phil prodigiousness-of-penis parsing of peikoff), don't hold your breath.

#122 Ninth Doctor

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Posted 16 November 2011 - 05:11 PM

my pronunciamentos (that's Italian, ND)

If you knew anything about Italian, you'd know that the plural for pronunciamento ought to be pronunciamenti.
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#123 Jonathan

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Posted 16 November 2011 - 06:30 PM

Dudes, I realize that you view me as your authority and guiding light on all matters testicular...


Do you mean that you're an authority on matters testicular because you've got so much experience playing with your own and other guys' balls?


...or literary and are waiting eagerly for my pronunciamentos (that's Italian, ND), but your last tutoring checks have not cleared. And I do have other duties.


So, you admit to being a Kantian! Ayn Rand on "duty":


One of the most destructive anti-concepts in the history of moral philosophy is the term “duty.”

An anti-concept is an artificial, unnecessary and rationally unusable term designed to replace and obliterate some legitimate concept. The term “duty” obliterates more than single concepts; it is a metaphysical and psychological killer: it negates all the essentials of a rational view of life and makes them inapplicable to man’s actions...

The meaning of the term “duty” is: the moral necessity to perform certain actions for no reason other than obedience to some higher authority, without regard to any personal goal, motive, desire or interest...

...The arch-advocate of “duty” is Immanuel Kant...




J

#124 daunce lynam

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Posted 16 November 2011 - 07:11 PM


Dudes, I realize that you view me as your authority and guiding light on all matters testicular...


Do you mean that you're an authority on matters testicular because you've got so much experience playing with your own and other guys' balls?


...or literary and are waiting eagerly for my pronunciamentos (that's Italian, ND), but your last tutoring checks have not cleared. And I do have other duties.


So, you admit to being a Kantian! Ayn Rand on "duty":


One of the most destructive anti-concepts in the history of moral philosophy is the term “duty.”

An anti-concept is an artificial, unnecessary and rationally unusable term designed to replace and obliterate some legitimate concept. The term “duty” obliterates more than single concepts; it is a metaphysical and psychological killer: it negates all the essentials of a rational view of life and makes them inapplicable to man’s actions...

The meaning of the term “duty” is: the moral necessity to perform certain actions for no reason other than obedience to some higher authority, without regard to any personal goal, motive, desire or interest...

...The arch-advocate of “duty” is Immanuel Kant...




J



It's definitionism that is the concept killer. Beware the thesauri within yourselves.

#125 william.scherk

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Posted 16 November 2011 - 07:17 PM


my pronunciamentos (that's Italian, ND)

If you knew anything about Italian, you would know that the plural for pronunciamento would be pronunciamenti.

It is a great word, PRONUNCIAMIENTO, adopted into English (especially), French and Portuguese from its origins in Spanish. In Italian, The English/French/Spanish Pronunciamento translates as Pronouncement; Pronunciamentos, as pointed out by Doctor, does not translate into Italian.

Just in case you doubt my take on the linguistic claims of Phil, here once more is the French Wikipedia weighing in:

Un pronunciamiento est un procédé par lequel l’armée se déclare contre le gouvernement en place dans le but de le renverser1.

Signifiant « déclaration » en espagnol, le mot fut emprunté tel quel dans plusieurs langues, dont le français et l’anglais.



Le procédé fit son apparition dans l'Espagne du xixe siècle avant de se diffuser en Amérique hispanique. AuMexique, ce type de soulèvements ont été nommés plans et ont pris un aspect plus formel que le modèle européen.



-- I won't bother to provide a URL this time, since I do not think Phil consults the language links I provide ...

But, in the off-chance readers may accept that I do occasionally do a little fitful research to support my position, I lazily and with degenerate intentions checked the Italian Wiki:

Il pronunciamento (pronuncia) è un tipo spagnolo e latino-americano di colpo di Stato. Il golpe de Estado era più comune in Spagna e in Sud America, mentre il pronunciamento era più comune in America Centrale.



By the way, Phil, did you yet have a chance to check your unreferenced musings about proper French usage of "place" against your copy of Robert or whatever massive Dictionnaire you usually thumb through?

PS. I am so frigging lazy, lazy, lazy. I lazily checked online with a fine Italian/English, English/Italian dictionary. Oh how sloppily I conduct my researches, sloppy sloppy sloppy.

But, being degenerate, I could not help myself. Lazy, fitful research is my specialty, after all ...

So, I hesitate to reveal what the stupid Italian dictionary returned to me upon attempting to discover the Italian meaning of Pronunciamento. I hesitate because it did not return Pronunciation, nor Announcement, nor Flabby Mistranslation Heroicly insisted upon Sorta Like Saint Paul ... but, OK, here it is:


nm

say-so


Edited by william.scherk, 16 November 2011 - 07:56 PM.

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#126 Ninth Doctor

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Posted 19 December 2011 - 11:02 PM

I finally got around to writing an Amazon review for The Prague Cemetery. I'm thinking of adding more to it, though.

Naturally, Five Stars

I have read each of Eco's prior novels repeatedly, and am quite fanatical about them. This latest one certainly ranks among the others, though not at the top, in my estimation. It may, however, be an ideal starting point for someone new to his work. It is his shortest, and I believe it is his "easiest" novel. The subject matter, while grim, has much contemporary relevance, so the reader should be readily drawn in. I read it nonstop as soon as it arrived, and have been through it maybe five times at this point; bear this in mind as I proceed to criticize it.

Various observations: the novel dramatizes the fabrication of the infamous Protocols of the Elders of Zion, and therefore the storytelling is more constrained by facts than in any of Eco's earlier novels. Also the book is unique in Eco's corpus in that it is told mainly through the eyes of the villain, resulting in less humor than you'll find in any of the earlier books. I suspect that for all his study of this fraud and its perpetrators, Eco simply can't sympathize with and thereby fully inhabit his main character. So he sidesteps the problem through meta-narrative trickery, reusing both the doppelgänger motif from The Island of the Day Before, and the quest for lost memories Macguffin from The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana. Readers of Foucault's Pendulum will already know the historical facts behind the Protocols, and the factual material presented there is only fleshed out a little further here, not substantially added to. The gastronomic details were rather odd, they seemed out of place, though the episode with Alexander Dumas making turtle soup was funny enough to redeem these sometimes off-putting digressions. Thematically, The Prague Cemetery is the flip side of Foucault's Pendulum; the earlier novel (Eco's best, IMO) deflates conspiracy theories, while this one might scare you into hiding under your bed.

One last point, the audiobook version is excellent, George Guidall is the perfect reader in this material. However, the book has illustrations, so I recommend that my fellow fanatics get both.
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#127 Ninth Doctor

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 07:44 PM

I think I'll borrow Peikoff's method when contemplating whether or not to read his daughter's novel.

Oops, it looks as though it's going to have quotes from other authors. Maybe I'll just save my money and wait for some future revenge/hate fantasies from that amateurish Bosh Fausten guy.

Oh! Jonathan! the pain of facing reality is no easier for the Objectivish than it is for any other human.

I haven't yet read the back blurb of Kira Peikoff's first novel, but I note that on the front cover of the image supplied to Amazon, there is this bit of log-rolling: "A tight and suspenseful thriller ... a remarkable debut!" The commendation comes from, um'Lisa Unger, New York Times bestselling author of Fragile."

Get thee to Audible.com to hear a 5 minute sample!

http://www.audible.c...31170760&sr=1-1
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