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#21 Jeff Kremer

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Posted 11 January 2007 - 01:53 PM

Ya, did it for two years. Parents don't have time anymore though. Though those were some of the best school years ever. Three hours of school a day cause I didn't have to deal with all the extra stuff.
The belief in the morality of altruism is the belief that you should use tires without treads on a rainy day so that you don't cause a crash by kicking water into another driver's windshield; you'll definitely crash, but you may have saved someone else. Government enforced altruism is just forcing the treads off everyone's tires. This will ensure that everyone will crash, but at least they will be helping others while they do it.

#22 studiodekadent

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 03:17 AM

Not a teen (Im 20) but my experience in high school was sufficiently traumatic to justify inclusion in this thread.

Grades: Was average (essentially) until grade 11 and 12 when, suddenly, my grades shot up. Thats because in grades 11 and 12 they judge you on abstract reasoning rather than neatness of writing and pretty glitter glue.

"Peers": Bullied, traumatized, loathed, put down, and so depressed I was literally suicidal, under the belief that something was wrong with me and I was defective, that some disease I had prevented me from fitting in.

Post School: After surviving, a mental wreck and a self-loathing suicide case, I eventually discovered Ayn Rand. I then realized that I was not defective, they were. Im now a third year economics student at university and with my newfound pride, ego and self-esteem, Im genuinely happy (finally).

The essay "The Comprachicos" made me break down in tears... it showed me precisely what those little brutes wanted and why I am nothing less than morally heroic for maintaining my independent mind. It showed me that they were diseased little wretches and I was human as humanity should be.
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#23 Jeff Kremer

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 03:36 AM

Amazing isn't it? The power people give to their peers. I'm quite possibly the ridicule of the football team, probably the weirdest kid that has an IQ above 80 on it, and I have been called a nerd by my coaches (although they're still the greatest and he was smiling so I know that he didn't care). I learned at the end of 8th grade that the average kid on this earth has the integrity and loyalty to reason and consistency of a rock. A rock being incapable of reason, I would say they have very little.

By the way, at just about any age you are welcome in here. It's so dull without grownups. More or less just Kori and I. Which reminds me, Michael, Kat, where's Inky?

Edited by Jeff Kremer, 12 January 2007 - 03:37 AM.

The belief in the morality of altruism is the belief that you should use tires without treads on a rainy day so that you don't cause a crash by kicking water into another driver's windshield; you'll definitely crash, but you may have saved someone else. Government enforced altruism is just forcing the treads off everyone's tires. This will ensure that everyone will crash, but at least they will be helping others while they do it.

#24 studiodekadent

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 04:45 AM

I learned at the end of 8th grade that the average kid on this earth has the integrity and loyalty to reason and consistency of a rock. A rock being incapable of reason, I would say they have very little.


The irrationality is not the product of the kids themselves.... nor really a product of stupidity or average IQ. I often find that those who cannot really grasp uber-philosophy tend to have much more commonsense reason: common sense of course was relied upon by both John Locke and Aristotle. Common sense reason is an ally of Objectivism, because more often than not (not absolutely but often sufficiently) it is a subconscious grasp of Objectivity. I think that the little pack animals are often created by adults and their institutions subjecting the young to cognitive mutilation. Religious schools are a great example.

One thing I love about Ayn Rand: she never patronized the young. She often made statements praising them for their acknowlegement of the power of ideas (free of cynical disillusionment). I was frequently patronized during my youth, and I still am, by those claiming to 'know best." Objectivism, on the other hand, empowered me.

Oh, and I know how it feels to be the ridicule of the football team, albiet my perspective was that of an outsider. That pack of brainless conformist brutes tormented me endlessly... how I would love to return the favor with a rusty razor blade and a bottle of sulfuric acid.

Edited by studiodekadent, 12 January 2007 - 04:47 AM.

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#25 Chris Grieb

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 05:07 AM

Twenty years from now when you have the nice house and there still in the same dead end job you can just laugh. They'll want their own rusty razor blade.

#26 studiodekadent

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 05:33 AM

Twenty years from now when you have the nice house and there still in the same dead end job you can just laugh. They'll want their own rusty razor blade.


Oh Im completely aware of that. But I still enjoy revenge fantasies. Its not like I actually would kill them.
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#27 Jeff Kremer

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 08:38 AM

A positive word for the football team here. They are hard working guys who are generally nicer than anyone will ever admit. The senior stars on the team are actually nicer than all the others. I think some football players are getting a bum wrap.
The belief in the morality of altruism is the belief that you should use tires without treads on a rainy day so that you don't cause a crash by kicking water into another driver's windshield; you'll definitely crash, but you may have saved someone else. Government enforced altruism is just forcing the treads off everyone's tires. This will ensure that everyone will crash, but at least they will be helping others while they do it.

#28 studiodekadent

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 09:05 AM

A positive word for the football team here. They are hard working guys who are generally nicer than anyone will ever admit. The senior stars on the team are actually nicer than all the others. I think some football players are getting a bum wrap.


Well, for one, they could be nice to you since you aren't an outsider like I was (at least not to the same extent) or you could have simply had an atypical experience. In my experience though, the football team of my school was composed of a pack of bestial monsters. This does not mean I consider all people that play football bestial monsters, however. My reflections are on a specific number of individuals, not a whole class.
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#29 Jeff Kremer

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 06:33 PM

That's fair enough. The funny thing I noticed is how it all ties back into self esteem. The guys that are on top of the team, the star athletes and all, are generally the most accepting. They don't have anything to prove.
The belief in the morality of altruism is the belief that you should use tires without treads on a rainy day so that you don't cause a crash by kicking water into another driver's windshield; you'll definitely crash, but you may have saved someone else. Government enforced altruism is just forcing the treads off everyone's tires. This will ensure that everyone will crash, but at least they will be helping others while they do it.

#30 Victor Pross

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 08:17 PM

Jeff wrote on another rant thread:

Man, this guy is truly unbelieveable. The normal english teacher shpiel is alright by me, but this is just ridiculous. I was complaining in class about the utter hopelessness of the book Kite Runner and how it makes it seem as if happiness is unattainable. Then, to my utter suprise because he seems like such a generally happy guy, he tells me that it is that way because it is meant to be realistic. Now, this is the first time I have ever been told by anyone that happiness is anywhere near unattainable. It really caught me off guard. Happiness to me has never been anything but a guarantee in the future. That holds true to this day because I know that I will work for it. To see someone that considers everything hopeless was just...a shock.

I made a mistake and offered a response to this thread. Here it is:



The hunt and finding of happiness and the maintaining of it is a worthy objective. Finding and keeping happiness--it has been a struggle to regain my equilibrium here. To get back the feeling that glorious things are coming at me from the far side of each curve. Speaking with others, I have begun to understand that they do not share this same struggle. Some have never known this feeling at all.*(1.1) Many people are happy just to be alive—in terms of “raw survival”--thankful to their god, their president, a job, their health. To them, a no-thrills life means safety. Accepting the ordinary is easy. The mind becomes lazy when you go with the flow. The world is filled with people who praise the ‘simple life.’*(1.2) My life has never felt simple, or everyday. My life is golden, a treasure above all other things.*(1.3) And I’m even happier now to share that life with someone else who feels the same way about her life. Her name, as you know, is Angie.

Although life has its hills, its ups and downs, there has always been in my mind a vision that I am moving toward some great purpose. It is nearly unshakeable.*(1.4) At times, in my life, I have looked about me and found myself sinking into the muck of the common. I have found sarcasm, apathy, even nihilism, creeping into my consciousness.*(1.5) This can find expression in my art. It takes focus, and effort, to keep the mind trained on my own vision of a golden life. It is different. But I will not reach it following the well-traveled path*(1.6) of the common. I find that I am drawn to things that shimmer. I reject the elevation of the unworthy. I stand in defiance of the ordinary.*(1.7)

Living is more than waking up each day. Living is making an effort. Living is switching off the auto-pilot, and reaching out for that which you know could burn your hand, wrench your gut, or break your heart if you don't get it. Our mission is to protect and nourish this spark within us--if we hope to live a happy life. We all know that infinite possibility is open to us, if only we make those brave choices.*(1.8) What seems like an obvious point can be anything but obvious. "Going with the flow" is seen as a great virtue in our society, when in fact it is not. The opinions or the behavior of the masses will rarely be anything special. To stand in defiance is the only way to ensure that you are looking out for your own best interest.*(1.9) Other people—except the ones you select by scrupulous standards—don’t care for you, not really.

Everybody has a hidden agenda. And you can be sure that they see their best interest is to be found in your defeat. That's their code: my gain--your pain. Yes, you have to look out for number one. That has always sounded like a license to be a brute, but it’s not. Not when it is rational. Not when you are fundamentally indifferent to the broad mass of undifferentiated units, living the life of custom-following, faith-based automatons. Select--very carefully--who you cohort with—and do it for yourself. You have ONE life, and that is it. Be wise with it.

In closing, I will only say that the struggle to defy the ordinary is not an easy. At least not for me. But it is the only thing worth doing.*(1.10) The rewards are too good to pass over. Ultimately, if I give up, if I lead a life that is ordinary, it is only half-lived.*(1.11)

Victor

NOTE FROM ADMINISTRATOR:

* Plagiarized from "Making Life Extraordinary" by Ashley Frazier. (Rebirth of Reason version here. Solo Passion version here.) The original passage reads as follows:

(1.1)
It has been a struggle to regain my equilibrium since last fall. To get back the feeling that glorious things are coming at me from the far side of each curve. In speaking with others I have begun to understand that they are not all sharing this same struggle-to get back to "normal"-some have never known this feeling at all.

(1.2)
Many people are happy just to be alive; thankful for their god, their president, a job. A no-thrills life means safety. Accepting the ordinary is easy. The mind becomes lazy when you go with the flow. The world is filled with praise for the "simple life."

(1.3)
... my life has never felt simple, or everyday. My life is golden, a treasure above all other things.

(1.4)
Although life has its hills, there has always been in my mind a vision that I am moving toward some great purpose. It is nearly unshakeable.

(1.5)
At times in my life I have looked about me and found myself sinking into the muck of the common. I have found sarcasm, apathy, even nihilism, creeping into my consciousness.

(1.6)
It takes focus, and effort, to keep the mind trained on my own vision of a golden life. It is different, it is unique. I will not reach it following the well-traveled path.

(1.7)
I find that I am drawn to things that have glitter, things that shine. I reject the elevation of the unworthy. I stand in defiance of the ordinary.

(1.8)
Living is more than waking up each day. Living is making an effort. Living is switching off the auto-pilot, and reaching out for that which you know could burn your hand, wrench your gut, break your heart if it doesn't work.

Our mission is to protect and nourish this spark within us, if we hope to live a golden life. We all know that infinite possibility is open to us, if only we make the brave choices.

(1.9)
What seems like an obvious point can be anything but obvious much of the time. "Going with the flow" or being "easy going" are seen as great virtues in our society, when in fact they are the opposite. The opinion or the behavior of the masses will rarely be anything special, to stand in defiance is the only way to ensure that you are looking out for your own best opportunities.

(1.10)
In closing, I will only say that the struggle to defy the ordinary is not an easy one. At least in my life it has not been. But it is the only thing worth doing.

(1.11)
Ultimately, if I give up, if I lead a life that is ordinary, it is only half-lived.

OL extends its deepest apologies to Ashley Frazier.

Edited by Michael Stuart Kelly, 03 August 2007 - 08:06 AM.

NOTE FROM ADMINISTRATOR: This poster was banned for repeated plagiary. Because of the sheer volume of his posts, the present one may contain plagiarism that is unknown to us. Please report any plagiarized text you find so we can edit the post.

#31 Jeff Kremer

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 05:16 AM

Damn Victor, that was great. Truly, I'll keep those words in mind as I continue on through all this.
The belief in the morality of altruism is the belief that you should use tires without treads on a rainy day so that you don't cause a crash by kicking water into another driver's windshield; you'll definitely crash, but you may have saved someone else. Government enforced altruism is just forcing the treads off everyone's tires. This will ensure that everyone will crash, but at least they will be helping others while they do it.

#32 Jehni

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Posted 02 August 2007 - 08:49 PM

I'm 21 -- or will be in a month or so -- but I'm a college student.

In my high school all the teachers told us that college would be horrible and that we had to prepare for it now...
Well, I never had to pull an all-nighter or kill myself to pass. I manage my time, have fun, and still get on the dean's list!
Don't worry college is no worse than high school -- It's not better:

1) My English professor tells the whole class that he needs an 8 page research paper on the Victorian Poetry style in his e-mail inbox in less than 24 hours and never grades the work after we all scramble to get it in!!

2) My math professor gives us the wrong page to do for homework at least twice a week (it gets really confusing trying to find the area when they need you to find the ditsance.).

3) No two music majors conduct alike -- are they going to cue the base? It's a 50/50 chance.

4) Criteria for the majors change from year to year... but to see the new criteria, students have to pay!

5) Underclassmen parking cost more but is farther from the dorms!

Don't worry about college... It's not all bad. After the first two years, half my fees went away and I got premo parking :)

#33 Ellen Stuttle

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Posted 03 August 2007 - 12:35 AM

Re post #30:

See.

The post is shortened borrowings from a speech by Ashley Frazier. See.

Ellen

___


(Note from MSK: Thank you, Ellen. Duly edited.)




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