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The Iron Lady


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#21 Dennis Hardin

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 06:27 PM

.Thatcher may well have seen herself as "doing a man's job" because there were no capable men to do it; but do you think she would have yielded place in her political career to a man, even one of abilities equal to hers, just because he was a man?


No way. I think this reviewer (Scott Holleran) is way off base to suggest that Thatcher only wanted to be Prime Minister because there were no men who were up to the task. There is an early scene in the film in which Margaret Roberts tells her fiance (Denis Thatcher) that she will never accept the role of a housewife, that she wants so much more than that. If that scene is anywhere close to being historically accurate, it shows clearly that Thatcher believed it was entirely appropriate for a woman to be in a position of power. She begins her political career when she is quite young, and clearly despises any suggestion that, as a woman, she should ever have to be satisfied with a supporting role.

I think Holleran was just trying to shoe-horn this interesting aspect of the movie into Randian dogma, without any real basis for doing so.

She certainly paid a heavy emotional price for her success, yet she demonstrated the heroism in women, though she may not have believed in it herself.


I think it’s interesting that both Thatcher and Reagan experienced severe symptoms of mental degeneration in their later years. Both were exceptionally strong leaders, yet spend their final years in a state of significant detachment from reality—as if the real world began to overwhelm each of them at some point. I’m not really claiming a causal connection here, but there’s a synchronicity that seems intriguing.

#22 BaalChatzaf

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 07:44 PM


I think it’s interesting that both Thatcher and Reagan experienced severe symptoms of mental degeneration in their later years. Both were exceptionally strong leaders, yet spend their final years in a state of significant detachment from reality—as if the real world began to overwhelm each of them at some point. I’m not really claiming a causal connection here, but there’s a synchronicity that seems intriguing.


perhaps, if one lives long enough, his brains will rot out.

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אויב מיין באָבע האט בייצים זי וואָלט זיין מיין זיידע

#23 Dennis Hardin

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 01:37 AM



I think it’s interesting that both Thatcher and Reagan experienced severe symptoms of mental degeneration in their later years. Both were exceptionally strong leaders, yet spend their final years in a state of significant detachment from reality—as if the real world began to overwhelm each of them at some point. I’m not really claiming a causal connection here, but there’s a synchronicity that seems intriguing.


perhaps, if one lives long enough, his brains will rot out.

Ba'al Chatzaf


There doesn't appear to be any necessary connection between age and mental deterioration. Bertrand Russell remained lucid until his death at age 97.

#24 Xray

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 12:42 PM

There doesn't appear to be any necessary connection between age and mental deterioration. Bertrand Russell remained lucid until his death at age 97.

It is true that mental deterioration of the Alzheimer type does not necessarily strike everybody of old age; but when it occurs, it is almost always those of advanced age that are affected (there exists an early-onset form that can start as early as in the thirties, but it is very rare).

About one in three people over eighty has Alzheimer's.
The growing number of cases is correlated with increasing life expectancy:

http://www.ahaf.org/...ding/facts.html
Worldwide, nearly 36 million people are believed to be living with Alzheimer's disease or dementia. That number is projected to increase to 65.7 million by 2030 and 115.4 million by 2050.
<...>
Approximately 5.1 million Americans are age 85 years or older, and this age group is one of the fastest growing segments of the population. It is also the group with the highest risk of Alzheimer’s disease. It is estimated that at least 19 million people will be age 85 and older by the year 2050.



#25 anamous Cares

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 05:50 PM

In america any one can become president that is the problem.
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#26 Selene

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 05:55 PM

In america any one can become president that is the problem.


Actually, they have to fit only three (3) criteria:
  • Only native-born U.S. citizens (or those born abroad, but only to parents who were both citizens of the U.S.) may be president of the United States, though from time to time that requirement is called into question, most recently after Arnold Schwarzenegger, born in Austria, was elected governor of California, in 2003. The Constitution originally provided a small loophole to this provision: One needn't have been born in the United States but had to be a citizen at the time the Constitution was adopted. But, since that occurred in 1789, that ship has sailed.
  • One must also be at least 35 years of age to be president. John F. Kennedy was the youngest person to be elected president; he was 43 years old when he was inaugurated in 1961. There is no maximum age limit set forth in the Constitution. Ronald Reagan was the oldest president; at the end of his term in 1988, he was nearly 77.
  • Finally, one must live in the United States for at least 14 years to be president, in addition to being a natural-born citizen. The Constitution is vague on this point. For example, it does not make clear whether those 14 years need to be consecutive or what the precise definition of residency is. So far, however, this requirement has not been challenged.

"Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice..and moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue."




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