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A Visit to the Thrift Shop


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#21 daunce lynam

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 02:43 PM




It would interest me what the tilte of the novel was that meant so much to this woman.


I posted this on my Face Book Wall yesterday:

Unfortunately, I lost the book in storage, along with thousands of other books, during the black hole in my life known as 1994. The book itself was of no particular interest -- it was one of those stories written for young women in the early 20th century -- so I suspect the woman (I think her name was Clara) valued it so highly because of the connection to her father. This is pure speculation, but given that the first entry was made in 1911, I sometimes wondered if her father might have been killed in WWI. There was no hint of anything like this, however. All the entries were short and straightforward, as I reported them in my piece. So why did she keep this record? For whom was it written? These are among the mysteries that make this story so fascinating to me. I have some plausible hunches, but that is all they are. There were no other notations or marks of any kind elsewhere else in the book.

Ghs

Her father would have likely been in his forties during WWI and not a combatant or direct participant. Can't be said of any brothers she might have had. If these people had been French though . . .

Your story is better without the title for the title would weaken the universality of it by the detraction, especially for the literalists who would go to Amazon and order copies even trying to find your lost one. (Okay, that last was too much.)

--Brant


Maybe just a different title - say, Second Hand (george's being the second hand to open the book, the second hand on a clock etc)

#22 daunce lynam

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 07:24 PM


Even after all these years I find this story chilling, party because there are so many unexplained gaps that could be explained in various ways by different people. If I were a fiction writer, I would long ago have used the premise for a short story or novel. In fact, I typed the inscriptions into a computer file (c. 1988) with this idea in mind, though I never followed up on the plan.

Ghs


A writer is a writer. I am surprised that an anarchist would circumscribe himself in this way.

If you found the time or inclination to write a novel I think it would be a pleasure to read. The passage you posted would make a perfect opener.

#23 George H. Smith

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Posted 31 March 2012 - 01:32 PM

I just got back from another visit to the nearby Thrift Shop, so I want to correct an error in my original post.

A large sign on the building reads: "Mission Mart Resale Shoppe." So, you see, this is a Resale Shoppe, not a Thrift Shop.

The Resale Shoppe is run by a local ministry that also runs a homeless shelter. A revival meeting was being held in the parking lot, complete with two medium-size tents and one smaller tent for the minister. He was saving five souls at the time, as around forty onlookers waved their upheld arms back and forth, keeping time to some recorded gospel music that I couldn't quite make out, owing to crappy speakers.

I approached the meeting tentatively, fearing that I might set off something akin to a car alarm that says Stop, Thief! -- except this alarm would say Stop, Atheist! But nothing happened, so I stuck around for ten minutes. That seemed like a reasonable grace period, before lightning struck me.

Although I wasn't in the mood to get saved today, I closely observed those who were. The "born again" process has always fascinated me, and, despite my atheism, I can understand people who find value in it. It reminded me of a group therapy session, minus the outrageous bills -- a cathartic experience that made the participants, most of whom were probably homeless, feel better for a few days.

I only bought two items at the Resale Shoppe -- a copy of Francis Parkman's classic, The Oregon Trail, and a proper pan for cooking meat loaf. I tried cooking meat loaf a few days ago, but all I had was a pan that was at least four times too large. So I threw in several pounds of ground beef and other ingredients. I ended up with so much meat loaf that even my dog hasn't been able to finish it yet.

I am so thoroughly sick of meat loaf that I probably won't fix it for at least another year. But when I do fix it again, I will have a proper pan.

Ghs

#24 daunce lynam

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Posted 31 March 2012 - 09:54 PM

I am blessed with three thrift shops nearby, but being thrifty and disliking shopping most of the time, I do not visit them often. They are my favourite shops though. I wish the donors of books here were as cultured as those in Illinois - there are no Parkmans to be found at Valu Village, Goodwill or East York Cares. Since the library strike I have had to read thrillless thrillers, detestable "heartwarmers" and banal biographies, but at least it has not cost me much.

What I like is the oldness, the usedness of the stuff that is being reresold. The sadness of a dressing gown that is almost new , maybe worn by someone who never came out of hospital to wear it. The perkiness of the bridesmaid's dress that was probably thankfully jettisoned. The stern shoulders of the good quality business jacket, which I hope someone got to retire from wearing.

And the simple oddness, and sometimes beauty, of the objects people have liked to have in their houses and look at. I am a sucker for vases and can't resist some of those shapes. Result, I have more vases than I ever have flowers, and either I get creative with tree branches or I have a vase collection.

Recycling is the real revival.

#25 daunce lynam

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 09:31 PM

I take it back about East York Cares. Just got Barchester Towers for 99 cents and am wallowing in Victorian bliss. And the library strike is almost settled.

#26 Selene

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 10:38 PM

I take it back about East York Cares. Just got Barchester Towers for 99 cents and am wallowing in Victorian bliss. And the library strike is almost settled.


Are you going to post any pictures of you "wallowing in Victorian bliss?"
"Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice..and moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue."

#27 daunce lynam

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 10:52 PM


I take it back about East York Cares. Just got Barchester Towers for 99 cents and am wallowing in Victorian bliss. And the library strike is almost settled.


Are you going to post any pictures of you "wallowing in Victorian bliss?"


Sir!

I have had several similar enquiries and I reply to you as to them, what goes on beneath the petticoact remaims beneath the petticoat.

with no horses frightened.

#28 George H. Smith

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 11:45 PM

I take it back about East York Cares. Just got Barchester Towers for 99 cents and am wallowing in Victorian bliss. And the library strike is almost settled.


I assume it was 99 cents Canadian.

I know this remark makes no sense, but I needed a segue to the following story:

Around ten years ago I was invited to speak at a Liberty Youth Camp (or something like that) near Toronto. The drive from Bloomington to Toronto is quite long, but my future ex-wife and I shared the driving duties and made the trip without any lengthy stops.

I needed to convert $100 U.S. into Canadian currency, so we stopped at a bank shortly after entering Toronto. I was wearing jeans, a tee-shirt, and sandals. I hadn't shaved for over a day, and I probably looked disheveled in other respects, so I apparently didn't meet the high standards expected of customers in Toronto banks. I say this because of the conversation I had with a female bank teller. It went exactly like this:

"Can I convert U.S. currency here?"

"Why? Do you have some?"

I wasn't in a good mood when I entered the bank, given the long and virtually nonstop trip, so this bit of sarcasm nearly set me off. My tongue can easily outrun my brain, so I almost said, No, lady, I don't have any money. I just thought I would stop by and chat with the world's rudest bank teller.

But I took a deep breath instead, since I didn't relish the prospect of an argument, and plopped down five twenties.

Ghs

#29 daunce lynam

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 03:05 PM


I take it back about East York Cares. Just got Barchester Towers for 99 cents and am wallowing in Victorian bliss. And the library strike is almost settled.


I assume it was 99 cents Canadian.

I know this remark makes no sense, but I needed a segue to the following story:

Around ten years ago I was invited to speak at a Liberty Youth Camp (or something like that) near Toronto. The drive from Bloomington to Toronto is quite long, but my future ex-wife and I shared the driving duties and made the trip without any lengthy stops.

I needed to convert $100 U.S. into Canadian currency, so we stopped at a bank shortly after entering Toronto. I was wearing jeans, a tee-shirt, and sandals. I hadn't shaved for over a day, and I probably looked disheveled in other respects, so I apparently didn't meet the high standards expected of customers in Toronto banks. I say this because of the conversation I had with a female bank teller. It went exactly like this:

"Can I convert U.S. currency here?"

"Why? Do you have some?"

I wasn't in a good mood when I entered the bank, given the long and virtually nonstop trip, so this bit of sarcasm nearly set me off. My tongue can easily outrun my brain, so I almost said, No, lady, I don't have any money. I just thought I would stop by and chat with the world's rudest bank teller.

But I took a deep breath instead, since I didn't relish the prospect of an argument, and plopped down five twenties.

Ghs


Oh, dear. You must have visited that bank during Saturninealia, when we abandon our habitual cheery niceness and indulge in the mean nasty quips we have been saving up all year. I have to say, I thought that one was pretty funny. L

But apart from that, Mrs Lincoln, what didja think of Toronto?

#30 George H. Smith

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 04:09 PM



I take it back about East York Cares. Just got Barchester Towers for 99 cents and am wallowing in Victorian bliss. And the library strike is almost settled.


I assume it was 99 cents Canadian.

I know this remark makes no sense, but I needed a segue to the following story:

Around ten years ago I was invited to speak at a Liberty Youth Camp (or something like that) near Toronto. The drive from Bloomington to Toronto is quite long, but my future ex-wife and I shared the driving duties and made the trip without any lengthy stops.

I needed to convert $100 U.S. into Canadian currency, so we stopped at a bank shortly after entering Toronto. I was wearing jeans, a tee-shirt, and sandals. I hadn't shaved for over a day, and I probably looked disheveled in other respects, so I apparently didn't meet the high standards expected of customers in Toronto banks. I say this because of the conversation I had with a female bank teller. It went exactly like this:

"Can I convert U.S. currency here?"

"Why? Do you have some?"

I wasn't in a good mood when I entered the bank, given the long and virtually nonstop trip, so this bit of sarcasm nearly set me off. My tongue can easily outrun my brain, so I almost said, No, lady, I don't have any money. I just thought I would stop by and chat with the world's rudest bank teller.

But I took a deep breath instead, since I didn't relish the prospect of an argument, and plopped down five twenties.

Ghs


Oh, dear. You must have visited that bank during Saturninealia, when we abandon our habitual cheery niceness and indulge in the mean nasty quips we have been saving up all year. I have to say, I thought that one was pretty funny. L

But apart from that, Mrs Lincoln, what didja think of Toronto?


"The Canadian glows with delight in his sleigh and snow; the very idea of which gives me the shivers." - Thomas Jefferson, 1805

Ghs

#31 daunce lynam

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 04:42 PM




I take it back about East York Cares. Just got Barchester Towers for 99 cents and am wallowing in Victorian bliss. And the library strike is almost settled.


I assume it was 99 cents Canadian.

I know this remark makes no sense, but I needed a segue to the following story:

Around ten years ago I was invited to speak at a Liberty Youth Camp (or something like that) near Toronto. The drive from Bloomington to Toronto is quite long, but my future ex-wife and I shared the driving duties and made the trip without any lengthy stops.

I needed to convert $100 U.S. into Canadian currency, so we stopped at a bank shortly after entering Toronto. I was wearing jeans, a tee-shirt, and sandals. I hadn't shaved for over a day, and I probably looked disheveled in other respects, so I apparently didn't meet the high standards expected of customers in Toronto banks. I say this because of the conversation I had with a female bank teller. It went exactly like this:

"Can I convert U.S. currency here?"

"Why? Do you have some?"

I wasn't in a good mood when I entered the bank, given the long and virtually nonstop trip, so this bit of sarcasm nearly set me off. My tongue can easily outrun my brain, so I almost said, No, lady, I don't have any money. I just thought I would stop by and chat with the world's rudest bank teller.

But I took a deep breath instead, since I didn't relish the prospect of an argument, and plopped down five twenties.

Ghs


Oh, dear. You must have visited that bank during Saturninealia, when we abandon our habitual cheery niceness and indulge in the mean nasty quips we have been saving up all year. I have to say, I thought that one was pretty funny. L

But apart from that, Mrs Lincoln, what didja think of Toronto?


"The Canadian glows with delight in his sleigh and snow; the very idea of which gives me the shivers." - Thomas Jefferson, 1805

Ghs


Heh. The founding father did not foresee, as he could not have been expected to, the 21st century in which there was no snow in Toronto this year, - and the things there are none of in America, would indeed give him the shivers.

Carol
glowing with suntan on the deck

#32 Brant Gaede

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 05:00 PM





I take it back about East York Cares. Just got Barchester Towers for 99 cents and am wallowing in Victorian bliss. And the library strike is almost settled.


I assume it was 99 cents Canadian.

I know this remark makes no sense, but I needed a segue to the following story:

Around ten years ago I was invited to speak at a Liberty Youth Camp (or something like that) near Toronto. The drive from Bloomington to Toronto is quite long, but my future ex-wife and I shared the driving duties and made the trip without any lengthy stops.

I needed to convert $100 U.S. into Canadian currency, so we stopped at a bank shortly after entering Toronto. I was wearing jeans, a tee-shirt, and sandals. I hadn't shaved for over a day, and I probably looked disheveled in other respects, so I apparently didn't meet the high standards expected of customers in Toronto banks. I say this because of the conversation I had with a female bank teller. It went exactly like this:

"Can I convert U.S. currency here?"

"Why? Do you have some?"

I wasn't in a good mood when I entered the bank, given the long and virtually nonstop trip, so this bit of sarcasm nearly set me off. My tongue can easily outrun my brain, so I almost said, No, lady, I don't have any money. I just thought I would stop by and chat with the world's rudest bank teller.

But I took a deep breath instead, since I didn't relish the prospect of an argument, and plopped down five twenties.

Ghs


Oh, dear. You must have visited that bank during Saturninealia, when we abandon our habitual cheery niceness and indulge in the mean nasty quips we have been saving up all year. I have to say, I thought that one was pretty funny. L

But apart from that, Mrs Lincoln, what didja think of Toronto?


"The Canadian glows with delight in his sleigh and snow; the very idea of which gives me the shivers." - Thomas Jefferson, 1805

Ghs


Heh. The founding father did not foresee, as he could not have been expected to, the 21st century in which there was no snow in Toronto this year, - and the things there are none of in America, would indeed give him the shivers.

Carol
glowing with suntan on the deck

Why didn't entrepreneurs bring in snow-making machines?

--Brant
the curse of socialism?

Rational Individualist, Rational self-interest, Individual Rights--limited government libertarian heavily influenced by Objectivism


#33 daunce lynam

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 08:20 AM






"The Canadian glows with delight in his sleigh and snow; the very idea of which gives me the shivers." - Thomas Jefferson, 1805

Ghs


Heh. The founding father did not foresee, as he could not have been expected to, the 21st century in which there was no snow in Toronto this year, - and the things there are none of in America, would indeed give him the shivers.

Carol
glowing with suntan on the deck

Why didn't entrepreneurs bring in snow-making machines?

--Brant
the curse of socialism?


I cannot find "entrepreneur" in my Oxford Canadian Dictionary, so the answer to your question is probabl, because we do not have any entrepreneurs here, whoever they are.

#34 daunce lynam

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 08:21 AM







"The Canadian glows with delight in his sleigh and snow; the very idea of which gives me the shivers." - Thomas Jefferson, 1805

Ghs


Heh. The founding father did not foresee, as he could not have been expected to, the 21st century in which there was no snow in Toronto this year, - and the things there are none of in America, would indeed give him the shivers.

Carol
glowing with suntan on the deck

Why didn't entrepreneurs bring in snow-making machines?

--Brant
the curse of socialism?


I cannot find "entrepreneur" in my Oxford Canadian Dictionary, so the answer to your question is probably, because we do not have any entrepreneurs here, whoever they are.






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