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#221 Merlin Jetton

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 01:55 PM

George rocks. Rocker rocks.



#222 BaalChatzaf

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 03:24 PM

The problem described is structural, not philosophical: how do we structure a government that doesn't become statist? The anarchical solution can't create a structure. It is only used as a moral retreat for anarchists with the actual politics in action practically beyond them. All relationships are power relationships that butt up against each other. If you want freedom then fight for freedom by getting and using strength and power to that end. Understand that power has all kinds of facets and the anarchist must learn to use the moral power of his position and the businessman economic power, the comedian comedy, etc. Understand also Utopia is impossible and undesirable except in the imagining of the freedom fighter. People will have to fight for freedom as long as there are people. A true dynamic; the only one possible.

 

--Brant

mo freedom--fight for your freedom!

You cannot structure such a government.  Every government is run by people and governments attract the sort of people who can validate themselves only by ruling  others or interfering with others.  So every government no matter how benignly constituted will go rotten.  I estimate it happens in as little as three generations.  The generation the brought the new government in is very jealous of its liberty. The next generation knows how their parents feel but it is only second hand. And the third generation has no grasp of the motives of the first generation and that is when the rot will set in for sure.

 

Only permanent revolution  complete with slaying of tyrants will do the trick.  As Jefferson once wrote - The Tree of Liberty must be fertilized by the blood of tyrants and patriots. That is its natural manure. 

 

Ba'al Chatzaf 


אויב מיין באָבע האט בייצים זי וואָלט זיין מיין זיידע

#223 Merlin Jetton

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 06:38 AM

Note the similarity between the ideas of Rudolf Rocker and Ayn Rand.
 

Having witnessed the rise of fascism in his native Germany, Rocker perceptively noted the fundamental similarity of fascism and communism.

Today we deal only with secondary differences….Fascism and communism are…not to be evaluated as the opposition of two different conceptions of the nature of society; they are merely two different forms of the same effort and operate to the same end.

As for why most western intellectuals did not condemn the statist core of both communism and fascism, Rocker believed this was because western democracies had abandoned individual rights and freedoms and were defending their own versions of statism instead, blissfully ignorant of the fact that the specific form of statism made relatively little difference. (link)

It is obvious what the fraudulent issue of fascism versus communism accomplishes: it sets up, as opposites, two variants of the same political system; it eliminates the possibility of considering capitalism; it switches the choice of "Freedom or dictatorship?" into "Which kind of dictatorship?"—thus establishing dictatorship as an inevitable fact and offering only a choice of rulers. The choice—according to the proponents of that fraud—is: a dictatorship of the rich (fascism) or a dictatorship of the poor (communism). Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal, p. 180.



#224 Francisco Ferrer

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 10:39 AM

This paragraph in particular is of enormous value:

 

Liberalism began as a protest against the absolute sovereignty of monarchical governments, so it is understandable why liberalism, in its early stages, sometimes contrasted the sovereignty of the people or nation with the sovereignty of hereditary monarchs. But this appeal, which was originally intended to weaken the power of governments, was later transformed into a rationale for the expansion of power. The “will of the people,” as expressed in popular elections, became the ultimate political good, an irresistible power that trampled under foot the rights of individuals.



#225 Brant Gaede

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 11:53 AM

This paragraph in particular is of enormous value:

 

Liberalism began as a protest against the absolute sovereignty of monarchical governments, so it is understandable why liberalism, in its early stages, sometimes contrasted the sovereignty of the people or nation with the sovereignty of hereditary monarchs. But this appeal, which was originally intended to weaken the power of governments, was later transformed into a rationale for the expansion of power. The “will of the people,” as expressed in popular elections, became the ultimate political good, an irresistible power that trampled under foot the rights of individuals.

 

Why is this of such value?

 

--Brant

I want what's in your head, not mine


Rational Individualist, Rational self-interest, Individual Rights--Libertarian--objectivist Objectivist, not an Objectivist Objectivist


#226 Francisco Ferrer

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 12:11 PM

I should have said this in the earlier post:

 

Smith's statement helps explain how the essentially libertarian political spirit of the early Enlightenment became perverted into an authoritarian trend by the time of the French Revolution. There have been a few works that address the transformation of liberalism from individualism to collectivism (Arthur Ekrich's The Decline of American Liberalism, for one), but Smith illuminates a critical point: democracy went from being a means to individual rights to an end in itself.



#227 Samson Corwell

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Posted 04 February 2014 - 01:22 PM

This paragraph in particular is of enormous value:
 

Liberalism began as a protest against the absolute sovereignty of monarchical governments, so it is understandable why liberalism, in its early stages, sometimes contrasted the sovereignty of the people or nation with the sovereignty of hereditary monarchs. But this appeal, which was originally intended to weaken the power of governments, was later transformed into a rationale for the expansion of power. The “will of the people,” as expressed in popular elections, became the ultimate political good, an irresistible power that trampled under foot the rights of individuals.

 
Why is this of such value?
 
--Brant
I want what's in your head, not mine


There is a time and place for democracy, just like everything else. It gets you authoritarianism when not used in moderation.
There is still truth even when we are wrong.
The limit of thought as a function of time as time approaches infinity equals the truth.
Anti-Machiavellian.
Deontologist.
Anti-Tenther, pro-Ninther.
"Liberty has never come from the government. Liberty has always come from the subjects of the government. The history of government is a history of resistance. The history of liberty is the history of the limitation of government, not the increase of it." ― Woodrow Wilson
I like to think of myself as having a unique perspective on matters.

#228 Samson Corwell

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Posted 04 February 2014 - 01:23 PM

I should have said this in the earlier post:
 
Smith's statement helps explain how the essentially libertarian political spirit of the early Enlightenment became perverted into an authoritarian trend by the time of the French Revolution. There have been a few works that address the transformation of liberalism from individualism to collectivism (Arthur Ekrich's The Decline of American Liberalism, for one), but Smith illuminates a critical point: democracy went from being a means to individual rights to an end in itself.


The Jacobins were a little nutty.
There is still truth even when we are wrong.
The limit of thought as a function of time as time approaches infinity equals the truth.
Anti-Machiavellian.
Deontologist.
Anti-Tenther, pro-Ninther.
"Liberty has never come from the government. Liberty has always come from the subjects of the government. The history of government is a history of resistance. The history of liberty is the history of the limitation of government, not the increase of it." ― Woodrow Wilson
I like to think of myself as having a unique perspective on matters.

#229 George H. Smith

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Posted 07 February 2014 - 11:33 AM

Toward an Interdisciplinary Study of Liberty, Part 1

Smith begins his discussion of the need for an interdisciplinary approach to liberty by noting some hazards of academic specialization.

My Cato Essay #114 is now up.

Ghs

#230 George H. Smith

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Posted 21 February 2014 - 09:22 AM

Toward an Interdisciplinary Study of Liberty, Part 2

A far-ranging discussion of the meanings of key terms in libertarianism, kinds of ideologues, and crucial elements needed for an understanding of individual freedom.

My Cato Essay #115 is now up.

Ghs

#231 George H. Smith

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 09:07 AM

Intellectuals and Libertarianism: Thomas Sowell and Robert Nisbet

Smith discusses the role of modern intellectuals in government

My Cato Essay #117 is now up.


I forgot to post my essay (#116) from last week. Here it is.

Intellectuals and Libertarianism: F. A. Hayek

Smith explores F. A. Hayek's views on intellectuals, whom Hayek called professional secondhand dealers in ideas.

Ghs

#232 John David

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Posted 08 March 2014 - 01:46 AM

George,

 

If you have interest in the Left's contemporary output, please consider Domenico Losurdo's "Liberalism: A Counter-History".



#233 George H. Smith

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 08:35 AM

Edmund Burke, Intellectuals, and the French Revolution, Part 1

Edmund Burke condemned the French Revolution as a digest of anarchy. What relevance does his critique have for the modern libertarian movement?

My Cato Essay #118 is now up.

Ghs

#234 Brant Gaede

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 12:16 PM

Waiting for 2. Great set up!

 

--Brant


Rational Individualist, Rational self-interest, Individual Rights--Libertarian--objectivist Objectivist, not an Objectivist Objectivist


#235 Brant Gaede

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 12:48 AM

Congratulations to George on knowing how to use his broom Corner for the benefit of almost all and sundry!

 

--Brant

hip, hip hooray!


Rational Individualist, Rational self-interest, Individual Rights--Libertarian--objectivist Objectivist, not an Objectivist Objectivist


#236 George H. Smith

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Posted 21 March 2014 - 08:26 AM

Edmund Burke, Intellectuals, and the French Revolution, Part 2

After criticizing Murray Rothbard’s interpretation of Edmund Burke’s first book, Smith summarizes Burke’s primary objections to rationalistic intellectuals.

My Cato Essay #119 is now up.

Ghs

#237 Brant Gaede

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Posted 21 March 2014 - 09:24 AM

Why am I not surprised George will criticique Burke in the next part?

 

--Brant

because he didn't in the second part--not because he's an intellectual egomaniac

 

next! (let's get what we can before he goes on strike because of some obscure Randian influence)


Rational Individualist, Rational self-interest, Individual Rights--Libertarian--objectivist Objectivist, not an Objectivist Objectivist


#238 George H. Smith

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 10:05 AM

Edmund Burke, Intellectuals, and the French Revolution, Part 3

Smith explains why Burke predicted that the French Revolution would end in systematic violence.

My Cato Essay #120 is now up.

Ghs

#239 Brant Gaede

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 10:26 AM

George, two of your Burke quotations in the middle of your article don't read like Burke but like you, but not you. It's as if someone had re-written Burke then claimed he was quoting him and you in turn quoted "Burke."

 

--Brant

but another great article!


Rational Individualist, Rational self-interest, Individual Rights--Libertarian--objectivist Objectivist, not an Objectivist Objectivist


#240 George H. Smith

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 01:18 PM

George, two of your Burke quotations in the middle of your article don't read like Burke but like you, but not you. It's as if someone had re-written Burke then claimed he was quoting him and you in turn quoted "Burke."
 
--Brant
but another great article!


What quotations do you have in mind?

Ghs




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