atlashead

Psychological Needs & the torture rack of specialization?

5 posts in this topic

It's up to each individual to know their own truth, which truth objectively exists; I feel I have the need to be multiple things firsthand: an engineer, a physicist, a biologist, and an artist.  I think they are roles that an individual has to play to be healthy psychologically.  In truth I'm making this post because I felt the desire to share how much I love engineering & science, and in the moment before posting, reflecting, I am sure that for the short term-specialization may be ok.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, atlashead said:

It's up to each individual to know their own truth, which truth objectively exists; I feel I have the need to be multiple things firsthand: an engineer, a physicist, a biologist, and an artist.  I think they are roles that an individual has to play to be healthy psychologically.  In truth I'm making this post because I felt the desire to share how much I love engineering & science, and in the moment before posting, reflecting, I am sure that for the short term-specialization may be ok.

Very few people are polymaths.  If you want to do well in science and engineering you have to drill down deep in a limited area of expertise. 

Basically there are two choices:  Learn a little about lots of things  or learn a lot about a few things. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/6/2017 at 7:25 AM, BaalChatzaf said:

Very few people are polymaths.  If you want to do well in science and engineering you have to drill down deep in a limited area of expertise. 

Basically there are two choices:  Learn a little about lots of things  or learn a lot about a few things. 

I learned a little about a lot of things, but the little is cherce.

--Brant

the third choice

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2017/02/06 at 7:17 AM, atlashead said:

It's up to each individual to know their own truth, which truth objectively exists; I feel I have the need to be multiple things firsthand: an engineer, a physicist, a biologist, and an artist.  I think they are roles that an individual has to play to be healthy psychologically.  In truth I'm making this post because I felt the desire to share how much I love engineering & science, and in the moment before posting, reflecting, I am sure that for the short term-specialization may be ok.

You CAN have it all, to your selected degree as you go along - which is the terrific value of having a conceptual mind. One can know some small amount about everything, and plenty about some things. I would advise, seeing nothing specific has seized your attention, to not limit yourself too early. Begin building a concrete and conceptual base for all those areas. (And get a truck licence too, do a paramedics course, learn a music instrument, qualify as a boat skipper, write poetry, learn to operate a lathe, etc. etc.-- out of interest or just for the hell of it. There is no telling when extra skills/qualifications can come in handy or may later open up a business opportunity/vocation). If I'd do it all over, I would have gravitated to engineering (which I considered sorta dull then but absorbing now). Still, the modern insistence and expectations of "specialization", I think narrows one over much, and well-meaning folk try to push one that way. Hear them, but they can't really know you, only you can assess your own mind. The main thing is to apply oneself to *something real*, otherwise it remains all too abstract. ("Science", e.g.)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ba’al wrote: Very few people are polymaths.  If you want to do well in science and engineering you have to drill down deep in a limited area of expertise.  Basically there are two choices:  Learn a little about lots of things or learn a lot about a few things. end quote

 

I watch a Fox Business Channel show called “Strange Inheritance” hosted by Jamie Colbie. It is weird how people can become obsessed by ONE THING to the exclusion of the rest of the world, but so much good comes from that human trait. Collections of artifacts like guns and sabers, and a dinosaur park in Oregon were featured on the last two shows. Of course museum owners and paleontologists are examples of a fixation with reality. And members of my own family are intrigued by all history and not the interpreted “spun” crap but what really happened and was said.

Peter  

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now