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    • Michael Stuart Kelly

      Major Update to OL (please click to open)   02/09/2016

      Sorry for the inconvenience, but we had to update OL and there have been some serious changes made by IPB. The real bad news is that they had to merge User Names and Display Names. This meant that I had to choose between bad and bad. I opted to keep the log-on information the same, so you can get on OL like you always did, but now your User Name is displayed. If your User Name and Display Name were the same, you will not feel the change. If they were different, you are probably irritated right now. I will figure out how you can change this so you can revert to the Display Name you used before if you like, however this may entail a change in how you log-on. The good news is that OL is now searchable from the very beginning. This means all the old posts from the A-Team in Objectivism (and everybody else) will finally show up when you search for something. I will keep changing this announcement as we adapt to these new changes. It's a pain, I know, but after looking around the backend for a bit, I believe the benefits will far, far outweigh the current irritation. They changed things in a hamhanded way and I don't like that, but I can't do anything about it. Benefit-wise, they actually did a good job, so please bear with us. In addition to this change, many good things are coming over time. You are the reason OL exists and I am sorry you have to go through this. Think of it like birth pangs... (All right, all right, that's forcing it.  ) Michael
Selene

A Van Gogh Like View of the Worlds Ocean Winds - Beautiful...

8 posts in this topic

"Yesterday, we took a look at invisible winds suddenly made visible, streaming across the Earth. This being the blustery season, I've got more wind today, this time streaming across the sea, but looking uncannily like a van Gogh sky."

"Most of the surface currents in the ocean are shaped by wind. In this visualization from the folks at NASA, the ocean is rich with lazy spirals that move in great circular sweeps (called "gyres") clockwise in the northern hemisphere, counterclockwise in the south. Think of the ocean surface here as a reflection of the winds above, a kind of watery mirror (though the spinning of the Earth, tugs of sun and moon and obstruction of continents play a part.) Click on this video, and you'll see the dance of wind-on-water everywhere."

by Robert Krulwich

Yesterday, we took a look at invisible winds suddenly made visible, streaming across the Earth. This being the blustery season, I've got more wind today, this time streaming across the sea, but looking uncannily like a van Gogh sky.

wind_wide.jpg?t=1334008810&s=3

Most of the surface currents in the ocean are shaped by wind. In this visualization from the folks at NASA, the ocean is rich with lazy spirals that move in great circular sweeps (called "gyres") clockwise in the northern hemisphere, counterclockwise in the south. Think of the ocean surface here as a reflection of the winds above, a kind of watery mirror (though the spinning of the Earth, tugs of sun and moon and obstruction of continents play a part.) Click on this video, and you'll see the dance of wind-on-water everywhere.

YouTube

I like watching the Gulf Stream roar past the tip of Florida in the beginning, all white and purposeful, heading up the North American coast. There's something playful about water and wind bumping into large land masses like Africa, breaking into whirligig spirals, spinning along the shore. Then there's the equator, which in this version seems almost wall-like. As the winds approach it, they flatten into jet like streams racing along a corridor.

What this map doesn't show is the newest discovery created by ocean gyres. It's called the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, a vast, Texas-sized clump of human garbage floating in the Pacific. Created by a convergence of ocean currents and wind somewhere between Hawaii and California, it's not visible from satellites. Apparently, a thick blanket of pop bottles and chemical sludge sinks a little below the surface so it can't be seen from above and, anyway, it turns out garbage doesn't clump in a spiral; it looks more like a Nickelodeon splat, so if we could see the Garbage Patch, it would ruin the mood created here.

This is an image of wild wind, water and spiral beauty. And what does it say about us that our first human mark is a splat that feels like we've dropped some mud onto a van Gogh painting?

==============================================

I thought this was quite beautiful and makes the intellectual arrogance of the global warming, global cooling, "climate change" marxists even more hilarious.

The audacity that they can possibly understand a planetary ecosystem as stunning as just this view of the winds over the waters of the world speaks to their immense ignorance and perfidity.

Adam

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Earth, the turbulent planet. It may not be alive, but it is lively.

Ba'al Chatzaf

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Earth, the turbulent planet. It may not be alive, but it is lively.

Ba'al Chatzaf

Oh, I think it is alive.

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Earth, the turbulent planet. It may not be alive, but it is lively.

Ba'al Chatzaf

Oh, I think it is alive.

Not really. Alive things grown on it, slightly below the surface and slightly above the surface. Go down 50 km or more and you won't find anything alive. It is way too hot.

Ba'al Chatzaf

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Not really. Alive things grown on it, slightly below the surface and slightly above the surface. Go down 50 km or more and you won't find anything alive. It is way too hot.

Ba'al Chatzaf

It is possible that there are life forms that exist in states that we cannot perceive.

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Not really. Alive things grown on it, slightly below the surface and slightly above the surface. Go down 50 km or more and you won't find anything alive. It is way too hot.

Ba'al Chatzaf

It is possible that there are life forms that exist in states that we cannot perceive.

Possible in the sense that it does not violate any logical laws. However we must wait and see if it is the case. For a long time scientist did not believe anything could live at great ocean depths (no light there). What a surprise they got when they found myriads or organism living around undersea volcanic vents in the pitch dark. The heat from the vents was sufficient to support life along with certain chemicals that came spewing out.

It would be a very, very big surprise if living thing were found below the mantle were it is very, very hot. At the earth's core temperatures are higher than on the surface of the sun.

Ba'al Chatzaf

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Not really. Alive things grown on it, slightly below the surface and slightly above the surface. Go down 50 km or more and you won't find anything alive. It is way too hot.

Ba'al Chatzaf

It is possible that there are life forms that exist in states that we cannot perceive.

Possible in the sense that it does not violate any logical laws. However we must wait and see if it is the case. For a long time scientist did not believe anything could live at great ocean depths (no light there). What a surprise they got when they found myriads or organism living around undersea volcanic vents in the pitch dark. The heat from the vents was sufficient to support life along with certain chemicals that came spewing out.

It would be a very, very big surprise if living thing were found below the mantle were it is very, very hot. At the earth's core temperatures are higher than on the surface of the sun.

Ba'al Chatzaf

Robert:

I completely agree. I use possible, rather than probable. I also do a lot of reading about life forms and when they discovered lichens on meteorite pieces from deep space, I tend to rule nothing out of the outside edges of "possibility."

We both understand that it would be close to "impossible." However, there is that fine slice of reality wherein amazing truths may lie.

Adam

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"

We both understand that it would be close to "impossible." However, there is that fine slice of reality wherein amazing truths may lie.

Adam

Nature does not care how much we think we know or even can know.

Ba'al Chatzaf

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