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    • Michael Stuart Kelly

      New upgrade with simpler interface   05/13/2016

      Once again, the fine folks at IPB made a new upgrade and things might not be where you started to learn they were. However, this is one time where I think they actually improved things for navigation. There are only a few big buttons: When you click on one of those buttons, some other stuff opens up, depending on which button you click. (Later Note: These only appear when zoomed in or in the mode for smartphones/tablets.) I'm learning this as you are, so I suggest you do what I am doing: click on these big buttons, see what they open and fiddle with the software some. Ironically, you will find there is a lot that is intuitive. That's what I'm discovering. (Later note: I just discovered that I was viewing the site zoomed in too far to see the normal view. The menus are still there with the old buttons, but when I zoom in too much, they disappear and the new buttons appear. I believe this zoomed in way is what the site looks like on mobile devices. I'm going to mess with it some more, then maybe make some explanations.) Sorry for the inconvenience. Still, over time, I hope you end up liking these changes. Michael
caroljane

Defamation on Solo

55 posts in this topic

Recently Seymour has stated on the above named forum that I, Daunce, am not a person with whom Xray would like to "sit down and have a cuppa" . This statement is false as I can subpoena Xray to testify and I demand that Seymour retract it, with a grovelling apology.

Furthermore she has mischaracterized Xray as a person who would be prejudiced against sharing tea with a person, just because that person is "skanky looking".

Added to her general statements that everyone except herself and Darren is stupid, I think a class action suit might be brought, except nobody here believes in class action.

Seymour - not a class act.

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Carol,

Take a deep breath.

What proof do you have that Angela drinks tea?

:smile:

Michael

Aha! I don't need to prove she drinks tea, only that if she did drink it she would be willing to drink it with certain individuals.

(In the broader legal concept of breaking bread, clanking steins, et altera)

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Recently Seymour has stated on the above named forum that I, Daunce, am not a person with whom Xray would like to "sit down and have a cuppa" . This statement is false as I can subpoena Xray to testify and I demand that Seymour retract it, with a grovelling apology.

Furthermore she has mischaracterized Xray as a person who would be prejudiced against sharing tea with a person, just because that person is "skanky looking".

Added to her general statements that everyone except herself and Darren is stupid, I think a class action suit might be brought, except nobody here believes in class action.

Seymour - not a class act.

Carol,

Take a deep breath.

What proof do you have that Angela drinks tea?

:smile:

Michael

Aha! I don't need to prove she drinks tea, only that if she did drink it she would be willing to drink it with certain individuals.

(In the broader legal concept of breaking bread, clanking steins, et altera)

Glad to testify, Carol - and what's more - I'll bring along hard evidence, right here from OL's cozy corners were there is documented record of me raving about tea as my favorite beverage!!

(bolding mine)

Speaking of tea, here's a nice post about my favorite beverage:

What in God's name is a cucumber sandwich? Is it as disgusting as it sounds?

Ever so British, old chap. Served at all the best tea-parties, especially if there are aristocrats about, and in far-flung corners of the Empire. (Yes, that Empire!)

Just the trick, I imagined, for the ladies, vegetarian Xray and Commonwealth Carol taking tea.

Actually, quite tasty, considering. Dainty little quartered white bread slices with the crusts cut off, and inside, lots of butter... and cucumber slices.

Thank you so much for serving this dainty, both vegatarain and Commonwealthian treat, Mr. WhyNot. I'm a committed bread muncher anyway, and just took a bite: simply delicious!

Phil, c'mon, overcome your skepticism and try them too!

Tony's post even has both Carol and me having tea together! This will also be entered into evidence of course.

In short, Janet's case has no legs to stand on. :D

We were even going to plan another tea party! Remember the thread "JR's OL tea party bash"? :wink:

http://www.objectivi...86

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Tony's post even has both Carol and me having tea together!

Does that make you both tea baggers...?

th804978946_m.jpg

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Tony's post even has both Carol and me having tea together!

Does that make you both tea baggers...?

th804978946_m.jpg

Only if the tea has a hefty tax on it.

We know how to party though!

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Only if the tea has a hefty tax on it.

Carol:

Good because we are really really good at launching your taxed crap into Boston Harbor!

We will voluntarily throw Hessians in also!

Adam

Party at the Pier tonight!

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Only if the tea has a hefty tax on it.

Carol:

Good because we are really really good at launching your taxed crap into Boston Harbor!

We will voluntarily throw Hessians in also!

Adam

Party at the Pier tonight!

Just keep your tarry mitts off the Brunswickers. The Hessians can fend for themselves.

I love a good pool party.

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Just keep your tarry mitts off the Brunswickers. The Hessians can fend for themselves.

I love a good pool party.

The Black Brunswicker 250px-John_Everett_Millais_The_Black_Brunswicker.jpg

The painting depicts a Brunswicker about to depart for battle. His sweetheart, wearing a ballgown, restrains him, trying to push the door closed, while he pulls it open. This suggests that the scene is inspired by the Duchess of Richmond's ball on 15 June 1815, from which the officers departed to join troops at the Battle of Quatre Bras.[4] Waterloo - Just finished reading a book about Wellington and how he commanded - amazing man.

I just looked up "tarry" and it has a lot of definitions and none seem to fit the way you used it.

Adam

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Just keep your tarry mitts off the Brunswickers. The Hessians can fend for themselves.

I love a good pool party.

Cove The Black Brunswicker 250px-John_Everett_Millais_The_Black_Brunswicker.jpg

The painting depicts a Brunswicker about to depart for battle. His sweetheart, wearing a ballgown, restrains him, trying to push the door closed, while he pulls it open. This suggests that the scene is inspired by the Duchess of Richmond's ball on 15 June 1815, from which the officers departed to join troops at the Battle of Quatre Bras.[4] Waterloo - Just finished reading a book about Wellington and how he commanded - amazing man.

I just looked up "tarry" and it has a lot of definitions and none seem to fit the way you used it.

Adam

Covered in tar, as in ready to tar and feather somebody like you did my poor great-great-great etc uncle!

Delicious painting. Did you ever read Vanity Fair? (not the mag the book). My absolute top fave reread along with Middlemarch. An ever-rewarding masterpiece. The scenes of the ball on the eve of Waterloo and the aftermath are unsurpassable.

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Defamed on SOLO? What were the odds?.... Whodda thunk it? ...

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[replying to Selene]

Did you ever read Vanity Fair? (not the mag the book). My absolute top fave reread along with Middlemarch. An ever-rewarding masterpiece. The scenes of the ball on the eve of Waterloo and the aftermath are unsurpassable.

Aah, I devoured those two novels! And what incredibly fascinating female characters are portrayed in them!

Can one think of two more different characters than the scheming, manipulative Becky Sharp in VF and the idealistic, philanthropic Dorothea Brooke in Middlemarch?

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[replying to Selene]

Did you ever read Vanity Fair? (not the mag the book). My absolute top fave reread along with Middlemarch. An ever-rewarding masterpiece. The scenes of the ball on the eve of Waterloo and the aftermath are unsurpassable.

Aah, I devoured those two novels! And what incredibly fascinating female characters are portrayed in them!

Can one think of two more different characters than the scheming, manipulative Becky Sharp in VF and the idealistic, philanthropic Dorothea Brooke in Middlemarch?

Oh, yes! I am sure that Becky was the inspiration for Scarlett O'Hara. And in Middlemarch, the Rosamund character is a sort of Melanie/Scarlett, really fascinating. Thackeray (who I think had a mad wife and a daughter) was a pre-feminist and did not know it.

"I know I could be a good woman on five hundred a year"/ - but would she not get bored? Want the room of her own? Maybe she always was only herself as the demi-mondaine she became. Do you think she poisoned Jos Sedley?

Did you like the Reese Witherspoon VF movie? I thought it was good, wish they had had more money to make it longer.

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Gweneth in Daniel Deronda is also one of the best female characters ever written-- with juxtaposition she could be a "trophy wife" of today, and she was clearly positioned opposite Mira the "career woman" (in the 1850s! Mary Ann Evans was a genius pure and simple.

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Maybe she [becky Sharp in VF] always was only herself as the demi-mondaine she became. Do you think she poisoned Jos Sedley?

I strongly suspeced her. What do you think?

Here is an interesting discussion of Thackeray's illustration of Becky behind the curtain. ("Becky's second appearance in the character of Clytemnestra"): http://www.victorian...keray/67.1.html

Did you like the Reese Witherspoon VF movie? I thought it was good, wish they had had more money to make it longer.

I haven't seen the movie yet; going by the info on Wiki, Becky's character was portrayed as more 'sympathetic' in the film.

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Maybe she [becky Sharp in VF] always was only herself as the demi-mondaine she became. Do you think she poisoned Jos Sedley?

I strongly suspeced her. What do you think?

Here is an interesting discussion of Thackeray's illustration of Becky behind the curtain. ("Becky's second appearance in the character of Clytemnestra"): http://www.victorian...keray/67.1.html

Did you like the Reese Witherspoon VF movie? I thought it was good, wish they had had more money to make it longer.

I haven't seen the movie yet; going by the info on Wiki, Becky's character was portrayed as more 'sympathetic' in the film.

Great stuff. I'm sure Thackeray meant us to think her guilty. I wonder if he got fascinated with her himself and had to keep telling himself how wicked she was. He was such a moralist.

Yes - how could anybody not find Reese W sympathetic? But I found it quite faithful to the book until the fantasy ending, totally inappropriate.

Re Eliot and Middlemarch, it occurs to me that our lately lamented seymour was a sort of Casaubon in her project to systematize all knowledge into the pomo grid. Life imitates art as ever.

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Yes - how could anybody not find Reese W sympathetic?  But I found it quite faithful to the book until the fantasy ending, totally inappropriate.

The ending seemed "fantasy" to me, too.

Another movie which was altered with an upbeat ending which I thought inappropriate to the story was the remake of "The Heiress." I think the original, William Wyler, movie was superb in every way, the ending scene chillingly wonderful, and de Havilland's voice enunciating her final line tone perfect:

link

When Morris returns, Catherine takes her revenge. She calmly orders the maid to bolt the door, leaving Morris locked outside [in the rain], shouting her name. Her aunt asks her how she can be so cruel, and she responds, "I have been taught by masters." The film fades out with Catherine silently ascending the stairs while Morris' despairing cries echo unanswered through the darkness.

I've never read Middlemarch. You and Angela talking about it make me wish I had. Maybe I will yet.

Ellen

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Yes - how could anybody not find Reese W sympathetic? But I found it quite faithful to the book until the fantasy ending, totally inappropriate.

The ending seemed "fantasy" to me, too.

Another movie which was altered with an upbeat ending which I thought inappropriate to the story was the remake of "The Heiress." I think the original, William Wyler, movie was superb in every way, the ending scene chillingly wonderful, and de Havilland's voice enunciating her final line tone perfect:

link

When Morris returns, Catherine takes her revenge. She calmly orders the maid to bolt the door, leaving Morris locked outside [in the rain], shouting her name. Her aunt asks her how she can be so cruel, and she responds, "I have been taught by masters." The film fades out with Catherine silently ascending the stairs while Morris' despairing cries echo unanswered through the darkness.

I've never read Middlemarch. You and Angela talking about it make me wish I had. Maybe I will yet.

Ellen

I thought the deHavilland heiress was wonderful too.

At the risk of putting you off (I know nothing makes one so resistant to reading something as having it pushed on you), I would love to know if you enjoyed say, the start of Middlemarch... just a thought!

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At the risk of putting you off (I know nothing makes one so resistant to reading something as having it pushed on you), I would love to know if you enjoyed say, the start of Middlemarch... just a thought!

I have no doubt that once I started, I'd have a near-impossible time stopping, and just now I can't afford the time to become immersed in a novel. Roofers scheduled to begin banging next week, and lots of other household projects in process around here.

After April 15th....(IRS day)...

Ellen

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At the risk of putting you off (I know nothing makes one so resistant to reading something as having it pushed on you), I would love to know if you enjoyed say, the start of Middlemarch... just a thought!

I have no doubt that once I started, I'd have a near-impossible time stopping, and just now I can't afford the time to become immersed in a novel. Roofers scheduled to begin banging next week, and lots of other household projects in process around here.

After April 15th....(IRS day)...

Ellen

OK Ellen, it's a deal. Start practicing your Greek Maidens dance for the Nice Party (hey, it's a cyberbash so we can be maidens if we want... matrons just sounds so...matronly

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OK Ellen, it's a deal. Start practicing your Greek Maidens dance for the Nice Party (hey, it's a cyberbash so we can be maidens if we want... matrons just sounds so...matronly

Remind me to tell you someday about the time I was the vestal virgin giving an opening incantation for the Roman Banquet which transpired my sophomore or junior year of high school. The men's gym was the scene. The banquet was a great success.

Btw, vestal "virgins" weren't "virgins" in our current meaning.

Ellen

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After April 15th....(IRS day)...

Ellen

OK Ellen, it's a deal. Start practicing your Greek Maidens dance for the Nice Party (hey, it's a cyberbash so we can be maidens if we want... matrons just sounds so...matronly

None of us are matron-like types anyway, I think. :smile:

Re Eliot and Middlemarch, it occurs to me that our lately lamented seymour was a sort of Casaubon in her project to systematize all knowledge into the pomo grid. Life imitates art as ever.

'Pomo grid' - very apt term! In a way, I feel sorry for Janet, as she seems downright unable to take off her pomo glasses.

As for Casaubon, I really loathed this character! The aversion I've always had against pedantic men was rekindled each time he showed up in the story. Having to witness, as a reader, the wonderful Dorothea Brooke getting stifled in this marriage was hard to bear. But it just shows once more what a genius as a writer Mary Ann Evans was, being to convey all this so convincingly.

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After April 15th....(IRS day)...

Ellen

OK Ellen, it's a deal. Start practicing your Greek Maidens dance for the Nice Party (hey, it's a cyberbash so we can be maidens if we want... matrons just sounds so...matronly

None of us are matron-like types anyway, I think. :smile:

Re Eliot and Middlemarch, it occurs to me that our lately lamented seymour was a sort of Casaubon in her project to systematize all knowledge into the pomo grid. Life imitates art as ever.

'Pomo grid' - very apt term! In a way, I feel sorry for Janet, as she seems downright unable to take off her pomo glasses.

As for Casaubon, I really loathed this character! The aversion I've always had against pedantic men was rekindled each time he showed up in the story. Having to witness, as a reader, the wonderful Dorothea Brooke getting stifled in this marriage was hard to bear. But it just shows once more what a genius as a writer Mary Ann Evans was, being to convey all this so convincingly.

After April 15th....(IRS day)...

Ellen

OK Ellen, it's a deal. Start practicing your Greek Maidens dance for the Nice Party (hey, it's a cyberbash so we can be maidens if we want... matrons just sounds so...matronly

None of us are matron-like types anyway, I think. :smile:

Re Eliot and Middlemarch, it occurs to me that our lately lamented seymour was a sort of Casaubon in her project to systematize all knowledge into the pomo grid. Life imitates art as ever.

'Pomo grid' - very apt term! In a way, I feel sorry for Janet, as she seems downright unable to take off her pomo glasses.

As for Casaubon, I really loathed this character! The aversion I've always had against pedantic men was rekindled each time he showed up in the story. Having to witness, as a reader, the wonderful Dorothea Brooke getting stifled in this marriage was hard to bear. But it just shows once more what a genius as a writer Mary Ann Evans was, being to convey all this so convincingly.

Oh, wasn.t he loathsome! I just cringed as the lovely ardent Dorothea mistook his chilly academic arrogance for knowledge, and enlisted herself in that lightless servitude. I agree it was excruciating to see her nearly extinguished, I was so glad to escape into the self-made troubles of poor Dr Lydgate and his lethal bride.

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I tag this onto an old thread because I could not find the title I remembered. New Low at Solo, which is inadequate anyway.

Today Dog has defamed not just Solo with its lowest point, but the Objectivist world in general imo, withhis fascist ravings.

J. Maurone made an appropriate response. We'll see who goes first over there, him or Dog.

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Carol,

Fred Luntz (a polling and covert wordsmith guru who frequently appears on Fox) recently made a very interesting observation. He said if the conservatives want to distance themselves from the repercussions of the class warfare discourse of the progressives, they have to stop using the word "class" when they frame their collectives. For instance, if they want to address the middle income demographic, they should not say "middle class," but instead, "hard working Americans." Granted, this is not as precise, but it implicitly flatters the people with a designation that has good moral conduct embedded into it, and it steps outside the class struggle frame.

I find the language this young man uses is loaded with the kind of covert subconscious stickiness Luntz pointed to. It's one collective after another in his discourse--all with strongly worded emotional anchors. This dude is a pure social metaphysician in the original sense of that term, even though it is a very limited concept. He is a collectivist to the core of his soul. And he constantly calls on "Objectivists" as if this were a class of people like a tribe. There are no individuals in his world on a primary level. (I base this on what little I have read from him.) There are Objectivists, blacks, Muslims, Hispanics, filth, betrayers, and so on. His outbursts show clearly that he wants compliance from all his imaginary tribe members. He comes off as having the soul of a bully.

Oddly enough, I don't find his racism as offensive as his wallowing in negative emotions. Lots of people are going to bash his racist rants, but not many over in those murky waters will object to his focus on spite as a constant subtext.

Just as laughter is contagious, so is hatred. This is physical. It comes from the way mirror neurons work. And it is common knowledge that when you cultivate excessive emotional negativity, you literally kill yourself over time. Ulcers, cancer, strokes, heart attacks, the list goes on and on.

The problem is that, since hatred is contagious, you kill those who go along with you, too.

If someone were to characterize this dude as "toxic," they would not be using a metaphor. His behavior is literally and physically toxic to those who spend lots of time around him.

There's a matter of degree, too. Barbara Branden used to give us a constant reminder. if you use your harshest terms for the people you disagree with, what is left to designate the real bad guys like Hitler? You end up trivializing the extent of their evil by leveling it to people who are nowhere near the monsters they were.

This is one of the reasons you rarely see me use words anymore like "disgusting," "contemptible," "subhuman," "evil," "filth," and so on. I do use them, but when I do, they tend to have impact. The reason is I choose my targets based on relevance, and I don't dilute them with kindergarten antics or overuse.

I'm on a Brazilian saying kick, so here is another. It refers to the true extent of the effectiveness SLOP has in the Objectivist subcommunity (and elsewhere) due to the constant yelling and nasty emotional environment this dude helps cultivate. (And he's not the only one.)

When one donkey brays, the one beside it doesn't budge, but simply lowers its ear to tune out the noise.

Michael

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