william.scherk

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Everything posted by william.scherk

  1. william.scherk

    Donald Trump

    Sweethearts! Unable to consummate the love of one erstwhile strong conceptual man for another. Meanwhile, the leader of Russia is somewhat troubled that Trump is not yet able to implement the Sweethearts policy enunciated during his campaign. From the Irish Breaking News site ...
  2. william.scherk

    Conspiracy theories and Conspiracy theorists

    Including those birdbrains in North Korea ...
  3. Do you ever get slightly confused by the term "Deep State," or wonder if another person is sensing the same concept as you? Here's an interesting analytical essay by Mike Lofgren, author of the book "The Deep State." Anatomy of the Deep State -- who knew there was a website called Wikispooks.com? Here's a link to their page on Deep State, which uncovers the interesting provenance of the phrase ...
  4. william.scherk

    At least it's Real Fake News

    The Ontario provincial election will take place on June 7th. The current premier, Liberal Kathleen Wynne, is assured of losing power, since her personal support has crashed below 20 percent. The Conservative, Ford, was until just lately expected to form a majority government. Then ... Then the third party in the legislature -- the New Democratic Party -- began to take support from the collapsing Liberals. A poll this week suggested that they could possibly form a majority, were the polling correct. So, Zzzzzzz ...
  5. william.scherk

    Donald Trump

    I forgot this one, the other Ontarian accent/patois, subtly lampooned by Ontarians of the Second City stripe: My audiovisual response ...
  6. william.scherk

    Donald Trump

    Lists! Newfoundland accent Prince Edward Island accent New Brunswick accent Acadian accent Quebec City accent Radio-Canada accent Montreal accent/dialect Montreal in-town English (Greco-Italo-Portugo) accent Beauce accent Lac St Jean accent Ottawa Valley accent Toronto in-town English accent North Bay accent Winnipeg accent Winnipeg-Saint-Boniface accent Saskatchewan accent Alberta accent Franco-albertaine accent Northern British Columbia accent Greater Vancouver accent "Standard" Canadian (Toronto) accent The Ultimate and most horrifying accent is of course the Conservative Leadership Hopeful accent in French. I will spare you the sound of Preston Manning's erudite but grotesque French. Think Ross Perot mixed with Leonard Peikoff spouting fluent Italian. Squawk. 22. There is some variation in the lunacy and bombing runs of the CHLaiF blob: Peter, bonus round for you. Guess which one won.
  7. william.scherk

    What to learn about Russian goals when you don't really care [updated]

    Back to Russia, Russia, Russia, guess what Jan? The spokespeople for the Russian government deny yet again that there was anything Russian about the downing of the Air Malaysia flight over a conflict zone in eastern Ukraine ... Deny! Click-and-go snapshot of a sober report in the Guardian: -- and from the Independent: Sober, sobering reaction from the State Department bureau of deepest, widest state, followed by deep-bottomed Presidential silence in three, two, one .... I am going to check the Always-A-False-Flag bureau of whoopee, Moon of Alabama, for what a beacon of the RebblesDiddit set may be peddling re the latest from the JIT.
  8. One of the items I fish out of the general Russia Russia Russia hoopla is geopolitical strategy. In other words, setting aside the unproven allegations of the Trump-Russia 'collusion' grab-bag, and putting to one side the actual details of the "Russia hack" of the 2016 US presidential election -- leaving the residual "what is this administration's larger strategy with regard to Russia, its hopes and fears, its ambitions." This is no easy task. The election campaign revealed just a few rules of thumb that a Trump administration would use in a new relationship. Each of us will have an impression of just what President Trump hopes to achieve in relation to Russia between now and 2020. For me, having studied utterances of Michael Flynn and the many Russia/Putin statements from the president, it is to "get along," to cooperate where it serves American interests, and perhaps to let Russia back in from the cold by removing sanctions where appropriate. In an sense, it is a desire to move the 'deep state' off its suspicious foundations in order to make a better partnership with the Eurasian nuclear power. (the 'deep state' I envision as the intersection of established policy [of the executive branch, including national security agencies] and law [from the legislature]; it is the entrenched state of affairs, the 'ship of state' -- a vehicle of praxis built up over time. The 'deep state' of course takes its orders not from a shadowy cartel, but from department policy as written, intelligence findings as transmitted, and law. Law as in the welter of official acts and regulations, eg, Magnitsky-related sanctions. The 'deep state' vehicle can be refitted and given new missions, but this takes time, time to install new commanders with clear mission statements, time to legislate and decree a change in direction, speed, goal and targets) Having established their own briefs on facts and values, strategy and intelligence, law and practice, OLers might like me might have asked themselves the same set of questions -- not of the American 'vehicle' commanded by President Trump, but of the Russian ship of state. What Russia wants. -- that boring introduction done, here is a well-written analysis of Russian imperatives: Russia’s Evolving Grand Eurasia Strategy: Will It Work? NB: at 4200 words the article is not light reading. But I suspect readers will be better able to answer the question "What is a proper Russia policy for the USA?" One person whose opinions I wish we could consult right now is the founder of Objectivism. Having a cold eye on the Soviet Union, a cold eye for any unfree state, a cold eye for dictatorships, Ayn Rand would likely be able to add moral clarity to the 'debates' about Russia Russia Russia. A couple of folks here have contended that Rand would be enamored of Donald Trump, a notion I find preposterous. But I could be very wrong. [Spelling and grammar plotzes fixed Jan 10, 2018]
  9. william.scherk

    Donald Trump

    Here's a trusted source on the cancellation of the Trump-Kim summit ... "he's used to a bunch of criminals who stab each other in the back all the time."
  10. william.scherk

    Donald Trump

    Xi, Putin and Trump are working together; everyone is falling for something something. Something Deep State something.
  11. william.scherk

    Donald Trump

    Betwixt cup and lip ... Them, again. They eat a lot of people's homework. On my sketchy list so far I remark upon something pointed out by Bob Kolker: One can relish a thorough shake-up, a 'bull in china shop' ethos -- even while holding a less than approving opinion on the President as a person, personality, human being. Strongman, in the totalitarian sense? That is not what our Donald is. Which world leaders does Trump respect and perhaps in some ways emulate? Putin, number one. Never said a bad word about him. Duerte, number two. Xi, number three. And of course, Fat Boy, number four. The President seems willing to 'guarantee' that Fat Rocket will be around for a long while ... Tolerating and mildly celebrating strongmen in other lands is one thing, of course. Purges of the "deep state" are not usually accomplished by the cleanest of instruments, as can be seen in Turkey, and in a minor ramifying way, in Hungary. Peter, you may be using "totalitarian" where I intend "authoritarian." The only totalitarian on the list is number four. Anyhow, it is best or easiest to simply dismiss any concerns from an Objectivish perspective as wholly without merit, as histrionics, or as emergent from Faye Knuze and her ilk. Still ...
  12. william.scherk

    Donald Trump

    Remarks. It depends. Honduras is a 'developing' nation. The Soviet Union gave way to Russia, and has had the same leader since ... well, how long has Putin been king of the castle? Canada's Westminster-style system is not quite like the USA's republican two-party system (we have five parties in the House of Commons), but our countries have enough similarities and many ties between such that we are firm allies ... As for the 'class' ... Little Honduras has a Gross Domestic Product of around 55 Billion US dollars -- which means in context that it is a very poor nation (not to mention its hideous violence). Russia, with a population of 144 millions, has a GDP of 1.3 trillion US dollars. Canada is an established industrialized democracy, has a population of 36 million, and posts a GDP of 1.5 trillion US dollars. [Added: Mexico, would you like to be in the same class as the USA and Canada?] How ya doin’ neighbors! How about an honest appraisal through my eyes and Canadian eyes? The death of expertise ... Tom Nichols not being a fun read, I'd rather return to question you over your earlier remarks about the class of Mexico-Canada-Russia-CCCP-Honduras. Do your remarks make more sense now, or less? We can put that slogan on a mug for a low, low price -- and ship it to you direct. Or you can take that hope and a five dollar bill and get yourself a hot beverage from capitalism. The subtext is that hope about another polity is meaningless, especially if you aren't curious about the state of reality in the other lands. That is why Canada has more freedom, lower taxes, a general distribution of advanced industrial prosperity ... and a dang high happiness index. How come? A modern-day history of brutal military dictatorships leaves legacies of state-sanctioned terror, death squads and judicial impunity (Honduras) ... versus Costa Rica? A lengthy sojourn (sixty years) under a single party's rule, leavened by corruption at every level of the state-allied economy (Mexico)? A late-in-the-day turn to real US/Canada style democracy, an opening of the economy to competition and integration into energy and transport networks? Mexico. Rising standard of living? Mexico, leavened by persistent corruption, criminal violence and a weak justice infrastructure. Canadians are, on the whole, much more on the move than Americans ... between provinces and territories, as well as between business interests and part-time retirement in a variety of second countries. Boatloads of Brit-derived Canadians enjoy a second Britannic citizenship, which for a time allows them entry into the EU as citizens. Multiply that by every country in the Commonwealth and the Francophonie ... But don't underestimate where Americans themselves have got to in the wider world. For example, the West Coast resorts of Mexico have heavy American contingents (both Hispanic and not) doing heavy business. From Vietnam to Kazakhstan to fabulous Montreal, Americans do business in 98% of everywhere. So, I would suggest we North Americans would go where money was to be made (if not retired or a student) easily or almost as easily as at home. For me, that would make Mexico and the US a first stop for my skills and abilities were I younger. My dollar goes a long way in Mexico and I have fallen in love with one village, and I would happily retire there, making trouble, making friends, buzzing along a little business development. Western industrialized democracies have the biggest "pull," I believe. At the same time, the incoming hopefuls are cognizant of the reality of borders and policies and 'welcome mats.' For example, foreign students in our North American universities: in Canadian provinces, under federal guideline, foreign students are cash cows, and are encouraged to deepen their ties to Canada through generous allowance into work. Meaning, study, spend, work, drop those dollars through our economy, thank you. And if you'd like to become a citizen, well, let's take a look at your experience, your language abilities, and your degree ... Welcome to Canada, newcomer! That is going to require a shopping trip downtown to the Statistics and Ladies Wear floor at Factco. Some of these are awkward questions. Personally, I relish "throw the bums out" elections. The shortcomings of the US system I have gone on about at length elsewhere. To briefly summarize, I think the system is calcified, crusted over as with barnacles -- in the sense of an institutional two-party lock on all elective contests bar a few. The simplicity of Canadian elections might astound or appall, given the framework of comparison. We get to clear out incumbencies at a far higher rate than you guys do. Bench-clearing moments, crushing defeats, drama. Think Kim Campbell, think Bill Vander Zalm or other BC leaders forced to step down. Canadians can only be spectators of the US drama, except for those of us who wield dual citizenships and residences. What's a "good" citizen? Hopefully not one that slavishly follows a leader as in a cult, hopefully not one who doesn't understand what loyal opposition means, and hopefully not one who ignores the 'other side' as being hopelessly evil or corrupt ... Unnecessary segregation can prevent a natural acculturation to a second working language in immigrant communities, leaving people isolated from the general run of the economy and levels of achievement in society. Up here, provinces and private societies through federally-funded and mandated 'welcome' practices help newcomers reach their goals of fluency and literacy in English or French. For both first and second generation incoming, public schools (with great effort) turn out fluent, literate graduates ... I learned French as an adult, and feel confident entering a conversation with a francophone. Two days ago I got to use my nascent Spanish on a trio of gentlemen who I heard speaking the tongue. They turned out to be workers, landscapers. I didn't ask them their origin or their destination, but I will next time. Bienvenido a Chilliwack, señores! Of course, I also seek to learn more of the actual local language, the tongue of the people who were here before colonists, Halkomelem.
  13. william.scherk

    Donald Trump

    Epistemology is a great place to begin your series on Trumphilosphy, Peter. I'd open with "How I love what I know about Him?" Basically, I think an Objectivish argument can be made for holding one's nose, voting straight Republican except in cases of Roy Moore, and supporting the agenda of a Republican President. You don't have to justify anything at all about the great leader to support his agenda. Once you figure out his agenda on the issues that matter to you, you can decide what to ignore, what to file for later ... What might concern a skeptical Objectivist in re Trump is a tendency to the Strongman. If you are Objectivish and kind of pine for a strongman and feel the emotional wallop of getting behind a leader, how do you navigate the one or two concerning things about the direction or management of this administration? Well, all opposition can be demonized and labelled unpatriotic, if you don't already have a few thought-stoppers ready. In the back of my mind for a few months is a blog post 25 Things to Love About A Trump Presidency, Even If You "Hate" Him. Must be my love of lists. Meanwhile, the Criminal Deep State is eating my homework.
  14. william.scherk

    Conspiracy theories and Conspiracy theorists

    David Seaman gets to plug his new project via a call-in at Infowars. Mixing up the authorized conspiracy-deducers but hey. A blonde from the Blob tells a new one about The Resident: If true, whattaguy. Meanwhile, doing more of what He does best ...
  15. william.scherk

    Incels

    I'll deal you up a volume-boosted excerpt. Otherwise, its a fault of the uploader (in this case, PJW's borg) If that didn't convince, here's some bright lights shone by Styxhexenhammer666 on the same subject, excerpted from the Youtube video "On Incels: A Symptom of De Facto Censorship and the Danger of Echo Chambers" ...
  16. william.scherk

    Incels

    The Paul Joseph Watson take on "Incels." For connoisseurs ...
  17. william.scherk

    Donald Trump

    "I come to praise Caesar." Has an Erdogan/Putin/Xi/Kim/Hoxha/Ceaucescu ring to it. "Genius of the Carpathians" and all that. Lèse-majesté and worse ...
  18. william.scherk

    Donald Trump

    It depends. Honduras is a 'developing' nation. The Soviet Union gave way to Russia, and has had the same leader since ... well, how long has Putin been king of the castle? Canada's Westminster-style system is not quite like the USA's republican two-party system (we have five parties in the House of Commons), but our countries have enough similarities and many ties between such that we are firm allies ... As for the 'class' ... Little Honduras has a Gross Domestic Product of around 55 Billion US dollars -- which means in context that it is a very poor nation (not to mention its hideous violence). Russia, with a population of 144 millions, has a GDP of 1.3 trillion US dollars. Canada is an established industrialized democracy, has a population of 36 million, and posts a GDP of 1.5 trillion US dollars. [Added: Mexico, would you like to be in the same class as the USA and Canada?] I'd like a list, Peter. We could call it "Hallmarks of Totalitarianism." But a more useful rubric for such a list might be "Hallmarks of Authoritarianism." Wishing a term-limited elected official of an industrialized democracy to be styled an Emperor seems a little bizarre to me. Suggesting Canada is creeping towards totalitarianism ... strikes my philosophical funny bone.
  19. william.scherk

    Fake News

    Scott Adams has a few ideas about the causes of school shootings, terrorism and fake news ... from "Scott Adams - The Causes of School Shootings, Terrorism & Fake news." I've cued up to the gist of his remarks:
  20. william.scherk

    Conspiracy theories and Conspiracy theorists

    Here's the latest from Roger Stone of Infowars; in this subtitled, 2X-speed trimmed excerpted video, Stone predicts multiple criminal charges against Deep State actors, notably the "psychopath" John Brennan: I'd like a list of psychopathic symptoms, and then a Dx/psychological work-up on the former Obama counter-intelligence official. Then we can talk.
  21. william.scherk

    Donald Trump

    Here's a studious look at the latest QAnon postings, cued up to discussion of the "'They, the Cabal ... the Luciferian Satanist Pedophile Elite" at work; NB - "There are no coincidences" ...
  22. william.scherk

    Reading: "Suspicious Minds: Why We Believe Conspiracy Theories"

    Sorry. I'm not playing. How tart. Somebody made a list, as people do. I took a click-and-go snapshot of a part of a RationalWiki page. RationalWiki is not affiliated with any blob organization, and so can be quite tart and mocking at times. I cannot vouch for the probity of its lurking editors, but hey -- it's a list and I like that. Now, a philosophical discussion of epistemology in re the items on the list, as befits a philosophical forum -- this may be more difficult to come by.
  23. I want to recommend a book I just started reading last night: "Suspicious Minds," by Rob Brotherton. As is usual, I read first the chapter that stuck out -- Chapter 5, The Paranoid Fringe. It takes a useful critical look at the seminal article by Richard Hofstadter -- "The Paranoid Style in American Politics" -- and also runs to ground a plausible origin of 'tinfoil hats.' The book is written in a wry conversational tone, and is not on the surface a ''scholarly" read thick with endless footnotes, but it also contains a very useful reference list by page number -- as well as a full index at the back. (My copy is from our local library, but I am going to order it from Amazon so I always have it on hand as a reference book.) Here is an excerpt from the first page that might whet OLer's appetite for more ... In a fit of recursion, I include this bit of commentary from earlier this month. It suggests that I am bound by ingrained prejudice/s, which may or may not be true ... yet leaves the door open to further friendly discussion. -- for those who like to check out reviews before purchasing or borrowing from a library, here's a selection -- which I thought remarkable. Remarkable in the sense of "how many reviews do not mention Donald Trump?" New York Times review by Adrian Chen Inside Higher Education review by Scott McLemee Brief Scientific American review by Maria Temming -- for the benefit of Dear Leader, I found the book is available at his local library too!
  24. william.scherk

    Reading: "Suspicious Minds: Why We Believe Conspiracy Theories"

    This doesn't have much to do with Trump (from which thread of endless love I excise this), so I transpose it here to my thread about the Brotherton book and its lessons and challenges. A puzzler. I'd like a list. Sorry. I'm not playing. Do your own homework. How tart. If someone doesn't have at the tip of the tongue a few examples of the numerous false-flag events confidently asserted to have been grinding on for decades -- it cannot be extracted against an invincible will. That being the case, there is a dangling item for our Epistemologue. Can confident assertions be assessed by "face value"? That is one for the sages. If event X occurred, can we transfer that reality to a series of imagined scenarios Yn without much further ado? My concerns with False-Flag assertions are engaged on a case-by-case basis. The most recent and largest eruption of claims I contest was connected to the April 2017 Sarin attack in Damascus that led to US missile attacks (this eruption reiterated after this years' chlorine attack in the Douma case). I am prepared for an argument with anyone here who asserts it was a false-flag act by "The Rebels" ... It's not like anyone has to come up with a List. But I imagine there is a List in some minds of arguable false-flag events in the 2010s, in the 2000s, in the 1990s, and so on back to the Gulf of Tonkin some decades ago. But who cares? Homework has the reputation of being arduous if not punitive. In the meantime, a relaxing Hawaiian spell on a VOX text-to-speech, which properly belongs on the Trump forever thread, but hey.
  25. william.scherk

    Donald Trump

    I'd like a list.